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Would be interested to see the actual prices for the examples

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"We modern smart men have figured a way to have trippy experiences without puking and going into an uncomfortable jungle with this funny superstitious shamans, we are the best!" As if doing a hit of DMT was nearly the same thing as a proper Ayahuasca ceremony done with a shaman coming from a 10.000 years lineage. Sigh.

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Of course it's not the same. For one thing there is a lot less bullshit involved in simply smoking DMT. Seriously though, there are a lot of factors involved but I'm sure going into the jungle to drink ayahuasca under supervision of some self-proclaimed shaman isn't the only reasonable or effective way to have your spiritual experience with DMT.

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Yeah, lets listen to superstitious people!

Why appeal to the age of an authority? If there's anything measurably beneficial about Ayahuasca I'm certain it can be extracted into a precisely dosed pharmaceutical.

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I doubt that anyone who has actually tried ayahuasca (or a similarly potent hallucinogen) both with a shaman and without would agree with you. Do you have any citations to back up this opinion?

The danger of your opinion is that it precludes research into things like drumming and chanting. Humans have been using rhythm to build a sense of community for thousands of years. Could there be something here for science? Could we learn how to help therapists and patients bond much faster?

I don't know these answers. Do you?

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Oh interesting, I hadn't thought of this from a therapy point of view. Any time you mix spirituality and treatment my mind goes immediately to scam, which is what I assumed this was.

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The New Yorker wrote a good piece on the use mushrooms and hallucinogens (which are similar to ayahuasca) having the ability to improve mental illness, depression, addiction, etc. They are testing this is troopers who return from battle http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/02/09/trip-treatment

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It doesn't sound like your definition of spirituality and my definition match at all. IMO, spirituality is understanding the significance of you, all of us, and the universe; it's empowerment of self, and understanding that we're all essentially "gods", able to change reality as long as we put our mind, and actions to it.

The shaman by him/herself won't do anything. Neither would the Ayahuasca on it's own. It's having the right combination of both (setting), and your intention (set) that leads to an amazing experience.

The funny thing is, the experience itself is not the most important thing.. it's what you do after the ceremony with your life, and how you change your lifestyle to make you happy.

Obviously, if the shaman isn't giving you the real tea, mixes stuff in, doesn't take care of you, and such, I'd call it a straight up scam.

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Any time there is treatment, there is spirituality. It's just that western medical approaches pretend there is none, whilst a lot of other approaches pretend there is more than there is.

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> Yeah, lets listen to superstitious people!

If you like, you can think of it as a kind of placebo effect. Which, you may be able to imagine, can get really strong under the influence of psychedelics.

Disclaimer: I've never used Ayahuasca, but I did organise a few shroom trips, where I paid a lot of attention to the "set & setting". Compared to other times, it makes a lot of difference.

Also see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Set_and_setting

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local registers often have very cheap prices for local TLDs for example for .it, gidinet.it has a way lower price than $14.99

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then again finding a job with a software engineering related PhD (in UK or US) is not that hard at all, is it?

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work with angularJS is actually quite easy to find in London, write me an email if you want some contacts

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In London with 5 years experience that's a reasonable estimation for web developers, especially if you are contracting

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If anything, that's an average for well-seasoned developers in one of the best paying cities in Europe. Not a minimum salary ("at least") of a regular programmer in Europe in general.

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Last few places I've worked, in London, devs with 10+ years were getting around $70 000.

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SEEKING WORK - Remote (Based between Thailand and London, UK)

Frontend Developer with strong focus on JS frameworks Before the frontend contracts in London I ran a web development shop in Italy so I have experience in a broad set of technologies Specialized in MVP/prototypes.

My LinkedIn profile (1) is currently missing my last position after RocketLawyer: Lead Developer for a mapping cross-platform web application (from zero to alpha release) for a UK defense company

Contact via email (2)

(1) http://www.linkedin.com/in/maffei (2) paolo@paolomaffei.it

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If you are half-decent at JS (specially if you actually can use Angular) I can get you a job in London (or even near Basingstoke if you now happen to live there) no problem, I'm literally swamped with work requests and got so many colleagues looking to hire decent frontend developers (probably Rails too but I don't do that so don't know that well)

IMHO if you are in UK there's no financial sense in staying outside London as jobs (and their compensation) are much better here

(contact: paolo-at-paolomaffei-dot-it)

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Totally disagree with staying outside of London. I'm in Glasgow, and there is an emerging growth of trendy Scottish startups (I'd like to think my company fits within that bracket too, haha) who are using some great technology.

If you're interested in some android or rails development work hit me up at hello@farmer.io

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Forcing to tweet AND not making clear it's a sweepstake?

That some two dark patterns.

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What's that 14.7% of 'Information Systems' unemployed graduates?

People that degree in IT but can't actually code/sysadmin/whatever is the technical skill they're supposed to have?

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Probably.

There's a non trivial number of these around. Politicians, students, parents, etc. are keen to build relevant skills is high demand areas. On paper that's great. In reality creating programs overnight and admitting students without the vocation because the funding and students are available is a recipe for problems. There are a lot of "IT Specialists," graphic designers and other (genuinely needed) "professionals" around that can't do anything useful.

Some didn't like it, so never got good. Some are just unsuitable talent-wise (I don't think I could have ever been more than a barely competent designer). For some it's a combination of things. Below average suitability. No motivation. Bottom rung course.

Thinking of Tertiary Schools as factories for turning people into professionals at something is problematic analogy. Often its a case of we need to do something, lets do this. The result is weird numbers. High unemployment in high vacancy professions.

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Not sure. The numbers in the infographic are from Georgetown's latest study[1], but I cannot find a definition of what Georgetown's categories are. However, their chart makes it clear that engineering and computer science are not part of the "Information Systems" umbrella, and since this only covers Bachelors holders or greater I have to assume the category covers CIS, MIS, and similar "business technology" type degrees.

[1] http://cew.georgetown.edu/unemployment2013/

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I would assume the issue is that most Information System degrees are unaccredited. There are only 36 IS programs accredited in the US.

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