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@Pedro It is here: http://www.muziboo.com/pro/

'Plans & Pricing' is a very B2B expectation where customers come with the idea of paying for a service. In a B2C service users only come with the expectation of trying out a service and if they comfortable pay for premium services. So, we show this page only after a user creates an account.

Users can actually be put off seeing a 'Plans n pricing' page especially for a service like Muziboo.

The answer is: Yes, we did that intentionally :)

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I'm put off by the lack of a plans page, but there are so many apps which hide it that, yeah, I thought it might be on purpose. It's very interesting to learn your reasons, thanks for sharing!

By the way, how did you learn that users get put off by pricing pages? Was it from traffic data or user feedback (or just your gut instinct)?

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User reaction. When we introduced our premium service (this we did with the consent of our power users) after almost one year of giving free service, many that joined new, wrote hate mails saying how everything in the internet should be free. That's when we decided this has to be subtle. The basic service is free. And, when a user clicks to share a track privately or choose higher bitrate streaming, we prompt him/her to upgrade cos those are some of the premium features in Muziboo.

After experiencing the service, users become comfortable and also know exactly why we are better than the lot of other free services.

In B2C subtlety in this matter helps. But you can't do that in B2B. Potential customers evaluate your service based on the pricing.

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In short, it's another way to lower the barrier to entry. Well played.

From my experience with threddie I learned there are a great many people out there who behave like consumers in the way they go about discovering new apps but, because they're decision makers at their companies, they end up B2B customers.

I'm not sure I like the idea of B2B saas companies employing B2C tactics en masse, I fear it would make for a silly red-and-yellow landscape where everything is FREE FOREVER SIGN UP NOW. Price transparency is good for everybody and it helps move the market forward (material for a blog post right there).

Alas, I fear I'm going on an off-topic tangent here, though the subject is intriguing. Thanks a lot for sharing your insights in this matter. I might drop you an email later. Cheers!

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Sure! Mail me at nithya@supportbee.com

There are some real interesting stats :)

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Typically in a B2C business, users don't care much to know how long you have existed or how long you will exist. If you shut shop, they switch to using another free service.

But that's not the case in B2B. I do agree that B2B is more lucrative. But, how do you convey to your potential customers that your service is here to stay. Businesses are not comfortable moving from one service to another. And, with so many start ups dying fast or pivoting fast, what's the best way for a service to build trust with its potential customers?

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Glad to know!

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@pajju thanks. Yeah I guess the video on the site should be more story like than being detailed like this. Will incorporate.

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You may want to give http://supportbee.com a try!

Disclaimer: I am one of the founders of SupportBee

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If you keep blinking continuously you don't lose sight of the yellow dots. But this is so strange!

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Like yummyfajitas's explanation. The original post is too long and convoluted...

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Spam needn't be taken into account. Also, the tiers can be based on a range - let's say upto 500 tickets, between 500 and 1000 and so on.

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@pbreit Most companies (not going to name names) know involving people or an entire team is what is needed to deliver great support but put in efforts to cap usage in that direction to make more money(which is okay). The lie here is how they claim they are by what they are doing helping their customers offer awesome support. Our contention is there are more sensible ways to monetize and we have no qualms calling a lie a lie.

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Fine. But a company can charge per seat and still legitimately claim to "help you deliver great support". Saying that's a "lie" really bugs me.

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It's tough to use real data because it is subjective. All I am saying is one should at-least give oneself a chance to find out what that threshold is. The books that I recommended in that post helps in that. Also, the Pivotal tracker suggestion works for me. Probably it will work for others too. But, do people that mindlessly work even know it is necessary?

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