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I misinterpreted the title as "X Windows consortium to close."

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I'm glad I'm not the only person to think that (mind you this was over breakfast and before much coffee).

I did think very briefly that it was something to do with X, then thought X was a variable as in "$X to close".

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me too

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How about FP64?

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They'd have to either sacrifice yield or sacrifice FP32 units.

Also, if they put FP64 support in their gaming cards they wouldn't be able to charge scientists and engineers extra.

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> Also, if they put FP64 support in their gaming cards they wouldn't be able to charge scientists and engineers extra.

Bingo. Not many entertainment problems demand such precision. Why not charge more for it?

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Well, if AMD had taken the need to get their GPGPU offering out the door seriously or if they had later taken the need for CUDA compatibility seriously then Nvidia would have had to compete.

Alas, we're talking about a company that doesn't even think it's important for their installer to reliably replace existing drivers. The result: I get to pay through the nose for my predecessor's CUDA lessons. Yay.

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Wat. They don't make gaming cards nor scientific cards. They make GPUs that go into iPhones and iPads.

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Who is going to use FP64 in iPads and Android tablets?

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Google is behind it this year.

Next year, who knows?

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You probably could do APL Warrior in one line!

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I love awk. I once had to search a multi-megabyte hunk of data that was made up of 25-bit data items packed into 32-bit words. Instead of doing bit packing and unpacking, I converted the words into 32 character strings of 1's and 0's. I ended up with a string 300,000,000 (that's three hundred million) characters long!!! Awk had no problems handling it.

To build the string, I had to concatenate 1024 of the 32 characters strings to an intermediate string, and then concatenate these into the final monster, because concatenate just the 32 character strings took too long - a reallocation after every concatenation.

That was fun.

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I believe this is an example of the sort of thing that the essay author complained about.

Bit-packing is simple. You spent a lot of time working around problems that shouldn't have existed in the first place. Even when using the approach you described, here is Python code which does what you described:

    >>> byte_to_bits = dict((chr(i), bin(i)[2:].zfill(8)) for i in range(256))
    >>> byte_to_bits["A"]
    '01000001'
    >>> as_bits = "".join(byte_to_bits[c] for c in open("benzotriazole.sdf").read())
    >>> as_bits[:16]
    '0000110100001010'
    >>> chr(int(as_bits[:8], 2))
    '\r'
    >>> chr(int(as_bits[8:16], 2))
    '\n'
    >>> open("benzotriazole.sdf").read(2)
    '\r\n'
This keeps everything in memory, since 300MB is not a lot of memory. If it was in the GB range then I would have written to a file instead of building an in-memory string.

The run-time was small enough that I didn't notice it.

The thing is, you succeeded in solving the problem, and are justly proud of your success. This is how a lot of scientists feel. But a lot of CS people look at the wasted work when there are simpler, better, more maintainable ways.

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And, of course, none of those bankers are in jail, where they should be rotting.

Even if a company is "too big to fail", its executives are NOT "too important to jail"!

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"Why have both an if-statement and a ternary operator?"

Because one is for control of statement execution and one is an expression that returns a value. Two similar-in-purpose but different-in-meaning constructs.

In my experience, if the ?-: operator is written in the same way as the if-else (condition, true, and false parts each on their own line), nested expressions are quite clear and understandable.

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Fleb!!!

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Ha! Nobody there I ever heard of.

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Avicci, no?

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I'm one of the happy subscribers. I prefer the mobile site, even on a Mac, because I find it easier to read and navigate.

On my Nexus 7, I use Firefox instead of Chrome because (1) I can use stylize to make it white text on black background, and (2) it has a built-in reader that makes the articles easy to read.

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