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Even more than that, if this is a success it could even increase the likelihood that Apple adds native NFC capabilities to their devices, by demonstrating that it's useful (and to whom and for what).

Like a couple others have said in this thread, I think this is more about bootstrapping an ecosystem driven by network effects -- the more people adopt it and the sooner, the more useful it becomes and the more likely it is to actually go mainstream.

Flomio isn't just selling this device; look at the higher reward levels -- they're also selling an SDK and cloud analytics infrastructure -- I think they'd be perfectly happy if nobody needed this because it was built in.

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yes I think that would be a much bigger advantage over their competitors

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that's pretty spot on

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Flomio was doing other NFC stuff before this, and considering the mentions of the SDK on the kickstarter page, I think that's their real play. I think they'd be perfectly happy in a world where this product isn't necessary. In the meantime, this is necessary to drag Apple devices into the small but growing ecosystem (and the utility of the NFC ecosystem is largely driven by a network effect, so this bootstrapping is important).

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Yelp's points of interest are frequently at the wrong location. I've noticed this using Yelp's native app, which displays things on Google maps, ironically (ironically because Google knows the correct location if you search for the same place by name; I heard that Yelp stores lat/long for each place instead of letting Google look it up by name).

In my experience, this problem with Yelp's data is worse in Europe than the USA.

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I think this is their "extensive beta and data collection period". Just using the entire iOS 6 customer base as the experimental set.

I think it would be kinda cool if they'd push the new maps as an app available for iOS 5, and if Google had their native iOS maps app ready, and the transition weren't so abrupt. I realize the mapping subsystem is baked in more deeply, with various APIs and libraries available to all apps on the system, not just a standalone app, but it would still be helpful to have the standalone apps. (If Apple Maps were available as a standalone app, that would facilitiate the "extensive beta period" you suggested without all the ire that they've attracted this way; and I really hope that Google Maps is coming back to iOS at some point real soon now.)

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I think this is their "extensive beta and data collection period". Just using the entire iOS 6 customer base as the experimental set.

If so that's an unfortunate abuse of their customers' trust, and will hand a big advantage to Google.

As you say there were many options like releasing a standalone test first to run in parallel with the google app, but perhaps because of hubris they were not explored, and so customers have had an unexpected downgrade on an app which is widely used.

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Actually, the open letter also recommends Google and Nokia maps, via their websites (because native apps don't exist).

BTW: Am I the only one that thinks it's fishy that Google's claiming (a) they only had 3 months notice of this change and (b) 3 months isn't enough to produce their own iOS maps app? I don't believe either of those claims.

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Why would it matter? If they decide to not release a maps app at all that would be their prerogative.

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I just got back from a 2 week vacation to Ireland. I planned and executed most of the trip on the fly using Google Maps on my iPhone 4S (3G data is cheap in Europe, even for nonresidents on prepaid SIMs!) running iOS 5.

Just out of curiosity, after I got back, I upgraded my iPad to iOS 6 to see whether all the complaints I'd read about Apple's maps were legit. Then I went and looked up a bunch of the places we'd traveled or stayed in Ireland, to see if the new maps would have gotten the job done. Short story, it would have been a lot harder. In the spot checks I did, the roads are there, and in one case the driving directions are better than what Google recommended, but it mostly didn't know what I was talking about when I searched for businesses, like hotels we stayed at.

Google has amassed a huge amount of really high quality data, not just roads but also businesses and places, which nobody else has. I don't know if there's widespread appreciation for how hard this is and how hard Google's been working on it (one example, and I'm sure this article is slightly politicized and the timing of it appearing now is no coincidence, but still, it's mostly fact: http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/09/how-go...). Hopefully Apple has the staying power to go amass the same data, but it's an uphill battle.

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The point here isn't whether or not you had a problem. There might be 100s of people reading that post and not replying because they did not have a problem. Without quizzing a representative sample of users, we can't figure out the size and scope of the problem.

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I'm pretty sure when your CEO comes out and says "yeah, we have a problem", that it's a pretty effing enormous problem.

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They do that on a regular basis, they did that last year after their pre-order page committed seppuku. They do that based on the scale of the public outrage, not really on the internal/technical merit.

People conveniently forget how Google Map, Nokia Drive, and all others let you down on a regular basis, and how much room there is for competition in that market. Street layout is mostly right in all apps. POI however is a joke in all of them. In the city of London, Google Map only has a fraction of the shops and there is no logic which one it has and has not. I does not have the Starbuck(!) in front of my job, but it has the clothes shop next to it and nothing else in the street. Nokia Drive keep sending me on farm/field trail when I'm in Spain. At the same place Google Map has random missing road or missing portion of road (those road have been there for 200+ years like the house built on it). I briefly tries IOS Map at the Apple Store and it has the correct layout but only label some of the road, making it equally useless IMO.

We are planning a trip to Japan with Google Maps right now. It is convenient only because of its interface - but really kinrin (something like that) is incredibly better at showing stuff that matters.

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Well, it's a pretty high profile problem, which it is.

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So neither the instapaper blog post (linked here) nor the news.me blog post (http://blog.news.me/post/21643399885/introducing-paper-boy-a...) comes right out and says it, but the point here is that since iOS doesn't let an arbitrary program schedule itself in the background or on a time-based schedule, but the iOS geofence APIs do let an arbitrary program schedule itself when you cross a geofence, you can abuse the latter to simulate the former?

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The puzzle-piece representation of structure is neat, but at a 2-minute glance it seems not to scale to real complexity.

One of the big ideas in programming is abstraction/modularity/reuse, and I don't see how that fits in here.

(I found the "procedure" block, but I don't see anything that fits inside it other than "break out of loop", which doesn't make any sense. And I don't see how to call the procedure.)

So I find myself looking at the samples everyone's demonstrating here and finding they're harder to read than real well-organized code.

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Well. There's a difference between "lack of sympathy for those who would violate copyrights" and "indiscriminate sueing of file sharers".

(Especially how it's turned out -- the few cases that went to court and proceeded to a verdict have absurdly huge penalties; the suits were structured so that often an accusee's best strategy is immediate settlement even if innocent.)

Many of us do rely on IP law to get paid, and there do need to be ways to reward and encourage creative work, but there also needs to be a balance.

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Just my opinion:

Sun probably knew that at the time but due to hubris didn't want to admit it, so they just willingly looked the other way and kept doing what they were doing. So you get Jonathan Schwartz, in 2007, wishing that Google would take a license, but begrudgingly congratulating them anyway, but not doing the "Official Android Pro SDK" thing you suggest. (http://web.archive.org/web/20101023072550/http://blogs.sun.c...). So that was a small mistake, a missed opportunity, but life went on.

Then at some point (maybe even before they purchased Sun, maybe after?), Oracle decided to waaay up the stakes with this lawsuit. Given how it's turned out, I'd call that a much bigger mistake.

So it was probably a little clear even to Sun in 2007 that alienating Google was the wrong call but/so they decided not to do anything about it, and then Oracle, well, I don't know whether it's correct to characterize this as missing a call vs intentionally taking a big risk in hopes of a big reward.

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