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Some banks—such as Thailand's Bangkok Bank—have a US branch just for receiving transfers. That way, you have a US routing number along with your normal local bank account number, and then can get your US pay despoiled just as if it were going to a US account. Fees tend to be lower than manually wiring money each month.

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Thats pretty slick.

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Somehow reminds me of Stratechery's writeup about Pleco, a Chinese dictionary app: http://stratechery.com/2014/pleco-building-business-just-app.... There's something to identifying a problem and working relentlessly to solve it—and, of course, to being willing to experiment and find a business plan that works for your product.

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Evernote's Web Clipper. Select the info you really need to remember or the entire article/page, and it'll be saved along with the link and any notes/tags/whatever you add. Lets you store more data than standard bookmarks, and takes away the risk of link rot since the important info is saved on your computer. Plus it works practically anywhere.

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I tried in the last, bit when the number of bookmarks rises,it,s feel that it is noto a "native" solution

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The problem I've seen is that it's not just geeks this time. Sitting around a New Year's party with mostly non-geeks, everyone was discussing how they were hesitant to install new versions of iOS now thanks to bugs et al (both existent ones and media trumped-up stuff). That's both a direct and a perception problem that Apple has got to fix, stat.

The only good thing for Apple is, the same discussions included frustrations over both Android and Windows 8. Maybe the thing is that now, everyone's an early-adopter geek.

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Thing is nobody complains about Android updates breaking everything (though there are a lot of complaints about updates not happening), because the upgrades are usually well tested (despite having many more hardware platforms). Win8 there was Metro, but I really didn't hear much about Windows being broken.

iOS and OS X have stability issues, ones that other systems seem to deal with more gracefully now.

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How many Android users ever get updates, though?

Win8 there was Metro, but I really didn't hear much about Windows being broken.

Huh? People screamed bloody murder about Metro. Arguably, it played a large part in the downfall of Steve Ballmer.

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How many Android users ever get updates, though?

All the time, a lot of functionality is updated through Google Play services, and many of the apps are updated outside the OS.

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2014/12/android-2-3-gingerbre...

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Good point, one that's solved in part by the general lack of Android updates on so many devices. Android devices (and sorry, I'm generalizing again based on what I see people around me say/do) are seen as a widget; buy this for exactly what it offers today and nothing more. iOS devices are, on the other hand, seen as future-proofed; buy this today and get everything new that's coming out over the next few years.

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No complains about android ? Lollipop is the worst Android update ever, there is a bug where the system process take up RAM until the phone can barely use one app without killing the last one and slow everything. https://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=79729

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I'm cheating here a bit as well, since I work on the Zapier team, but some of my favorite use cases are ways my wife uses Zapier for her small business. Whenever an Ebay or Etsy sale comes in via PayPal, Zapier records the sale, along with fees and shipping price, in a Google Docs spreadsheet, and then copies the shipping address to a plain text document in Dropbox to easily print out address labels. It's a tiny thing that saves a ton of time.

Then, I've got Twilio integrations with Zapier that let me get Twilio SMS messages on my phone, and more, which I wrote about here: https://zapier.com/blog/how-to-twilio-international-phone-nu...

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In Thailand, it's the opposite: Burger Kings are most likely to be in upscale restaurants and have far more "classy" dining rooms than McDonalds. Feels very strange, to be honest, and they still don't get much business.

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You could hook GitHub up to Trello pretty deeply with Zapier (https://zapier.com/zapbook/github/trello/).

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If it's anything like the hackintosh market, this could help iOS device sales if people tried and liked the iOS apps they could get on Android. Plenty of us who had a hackintosh (myself only in a virtual machine, but still) ended up switching to the Mac after trying out OS X that way.

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And so I'm crying like a baby. That was beautifully, tragically well written.

Screw all the social media apps and the rest of the nonsense we're all working on. We need to cure cancer, yesterday.

If only it were that easy...

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My mom has cancer. She loves to keep in touch on social media.

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Very, very good point.

A lady I knew only through playing a game (which is an app of sorts) put a lot of effort into said game and became the lynchpin of the community. She passed on due to the c-word that we don't speak of. We were collectively devastated, some of my other online friends stopped playing for a week or two and things were not the same afterwards. Her daughter had the good sense to log on to the phone and tell us what had happened, we were kept from the truth until then.

I was deeply shocked by the turn of events, much like how, on the internet 'nobody knows you are a dog', nobody knows you are dying of c-word on some hospital ward. But we didn't need to know that, in-game conversation was light hearted banter, no special treatment, which was good. From that hospital ward that lady had a good fifty to a hundred 'in game' friends all around the world, we were there, outside of visiting hours, 24/7.

I think I was more shocked and with more grief layers to go through than I have experienced when some of my relatives have passed on. You would wonder how you could be so upset about losing someone that you only spent six months of your life compulsively playing an online game with. But it can happen.

So, +1 to your original point. Games and apps or fancy shopping websites might seem trivial when there are so many problems in the world, however, through such things community can exist. People in those communities treat others as normal, they stay on topic and people that are seriously ill really appreciate it.

I am at a loss for meaningful kind words for your mom. 'I hope she gets...' - after that I am stuck. However, if she doesn't play online games, get her to do so, and to make friends with a community of people that don't care about how ill she is.

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Who cares if it's not easy? It's important.

There was a day when we sent men into space just for the challenge. I don't think that merely doing a lot of difficult and complex medical research is beyond our power.

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You're right. It's very important, more so than putting a human on Mars.

What I meant is that cancer is far more than just one thing to cure. I have a friend who's a cancer researcher working with immunotherapy, one of the more promising new directions for cancer research. And yet, even if we can cure, say, leukemia with it, there's still other cancers that may or may not be curable in the same way.

Still, it is a hope that one day we'll have a cure for all the varied types of cancer. It's still not going to be easy.

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I get you, but I still think that even scientific research is largely a matter of committing the societal effort rather than of some Mysterious Power of Science -- which is how people seem to act about cancer research. And it's quite frustrating to me, because I hear lots of people say things like, "Why should we fund cancer research? Cancer is a thousand different incurable little things that always get you eventually. Disease and death will always be a part of old age, so why are we throwing public money down the drain?"

You know, like they already do with fusion research, and most other forms of clean-energy development. Then, a decade after they said that sort of thing, someone ends up in another stupid war for control of fossil-fuels, and on net, tens of thousands of people die painfully and pointlessly because a few despairniks found it more convenient to claim science doesn't work than to spend even a little effort on actually doing some good for the world.

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I'm currently reading "The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer" by Siddhartha Mukherjee. It's an amazing book, and I'm learning a lot. I think you would, too.

He talks at length on the societal efforts to "cure cancer", and how those came about. I think you're under the impression that we don't spend much money or effort on cancer research, but we do. We spend a lot of both. I suppose we can debate if it's "enough." It is, however, a ridiculously hard problem. There needed to be, and still need to be, fundamental scientific breakthroughs in order for treatments to progress.

Anyway, I'm not so much trying to counter what you've said. Rather, I want to point you to a book that I think covers topics that you are clearly interested in.

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I'd love to see a world that invested all of its military spending into medical research instead. We could cure so much if we did so.

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Wouldn’t seeing that world while not being able to live in it rather depressing? And while I have to agree that medical research is important, there is not just medical research which is underfunded. The things we could end up with when providing more funding for even completely theoretical physics (say, String Theory) are thoroughly amazing.

On the other hand, there is a lot of hit-or-miss in these areas, probably not quite dissimilar to how funding for startups works: 95% of all projects/ideas will fail within the first few weeks/months and not provide any useful results whereas the last 5% make up for thousands of years (quite literally) of research and suffering.

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Somehow that title, contrasted with the chart (http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/01/business/economy/changed-l...) showing how the price of food, especially has gone up in recent years while tech prices have fallen, makes me worry about a future reality where real food is so expensive it's only for the elite, and everyone else subsists on supplements like Soylent.

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This is part of the plot of "Soylent Green".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soylent_green

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Right. Disconcerting to see its namesake being a foreshadow of said plot becoming quasi-reality.

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This is already happening with fast food industry competing on price - lower-priced items at McDonalds or Pizza Hut are chemical variations optimized for longer shelf life.

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