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Nope.. Adding up all the tiers up totals a maximum of $9,550,000, for a total of 56k watches.

Interesting that they didn't design this to break their 10.2M record of the first campaign. I'd bet they are going to increase the slots or or announce addons for the pledges to go for it. At this rate they are going to be sold out in a couple hours, if that.

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They posted an update saying they're bumping the 2nd single-watch tier by 10k, and will add a new single-watch tier with a later ship date when that sells out.

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I'm sure someone at Kickstarter would be happy to immediately add a new tier for them if they max out.

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They should be able to do that themselves (I've seen a lot of projects adding tiers in the middle of campaigns, you can't remove/change existing tiers).

Kickstarter shouldn't be able to add new tiers by themselves, as they have no say what the price/rewards should be. The current tiers are likely (hopefully) carefully planned based on their manufacturing plans and how many watches they can fulfill in the schedule given.

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This is well available today. For example, there's an app for that:

https://keysduplicated.com/

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Anecdotally: Guilty as charged, on both accounts.

I also have a physical stack of unread books, which I'll probably never get around to read now that I have a Kindle, created mostly due to impulse buying on bookstores. Some I also bought again digitally.

I'm now growing my virtual kindle queue, faster than I can read, but with a different approach: I added all my wishlist authors (including cstross, incidentally) to ereaderiq, which notifies me of price drops, and buy 1.99 daily deals or similar range. So far I got very good deals on good titles of Arthur Clarke, Kurt Vonnegut, Neal Stephenson, William Gibson and so on.

So, again, anecdotally, I might buy things that I'll never read, but the amount of titles that I haven't read is bigger than my daily reading time, and after a certain quality threshold, titles seem mostly interchangeable.

I'd guess the best price point is the one just on 'impulse buy'.

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http://www.alcor.org/FAQs/faq01.html#patients

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That's pretty much the idea of Braid, an awesome indie game. It uses time manipulation in different ways to create mechanics in that vein. Recommended.

It's a different concept than true 4D though.

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Or the "Car allergic to vanilla ice cream" tale.

http://www.cgl.uwaterloo.ca/~smann/IceCream/humor.html

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Or the "OpenOffice can't print on Tuesdays" bug https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/cupsys/+bug/255161...

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That one reminds me of the system I worked on years ago that wouldn't accept credit cards that expired in August or September (of any year).

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I bet it was a Javascript system that tried to interpret month numbers of 08 and 09 as octal because of the leading zero. Am I close?

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That's clearly a tale rather than a true event. The guy would have noticed during other extremely short trips that his car wouldn't start afterwards.

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Wonder how they would react if they saw swedish babies napping outside in sub-zero temperatures:

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-21537988

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I didn't go over well.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/08/15/us-restaurant-baby...

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http://fstoppers.com/photoshop-wont-let-you-work-with-images...

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Thanks for the link. I finally found a proper US note and the new ones are in fact blocked from being edited in Photoshop.

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Another disaster about to happen is Games for Windows Live, a online DRM scheme, used by many games, but in particular GTA IV, which doesn't have much on online features except for the DRM check. It has been announted that GFWL is going to shutdown July 1st. Many developers/publishers have indicated that they are going to remove/replace it, but Rockstar not only hasn't mentioned anything in that sense, it has recently updated the fine print on the steam store for GTA IV adding new clauses:

    Access to special features may require internet connection, may not be available to all users, and may, upon 30 days’ notice, be terminated, modified, or offered under different terms.
    Unauthorized copying, reverse engineering, transmission, public performance, rental, pay for play, or circumvention of copy protection is strictly prohibited
    Partner Requirements: Please check the terms of service of this site before purchasing this software. rockstargames.com/eula
So while Rockstar is washing their hands if their offline, single player, triple-A game stops working in six months, and also prohibiting circumvention of this 'protection', GTA IV is happily being sold by Steam, even today being promoted in their store front page as a daily deal of their winter sale.

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Thankfully the community still has an active group of modders so even if Rockstar doesn't fix it, we should eventually get a patch.

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I wouldn't be too worried about this. Batman: Arkham Asylum and Arkham City both utilized GFWL, and Rocksteady (the developer) simply released a patch that removed the GFWL software. They play just as great as ever.

EDIT: Just kidding. I did not read your comment close enough, clearly. Here's to hoping that Rockstar is as stand-up as Rocksteady, at least.

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I think if they're going to argue that routine gameplay is a special feature, they're going to be on a loser when the courts and/or trading standards people get hold of them. At least in the UK, that term seems to be clearly unfair and therefore unlikely to stand up if customers start demanding compensation.

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What bugs me about this explanation is the following: aren't we moving quite a bit all the time? We go along the earth as it's rotating around itself, then revolving around the sun, then the solar system revolving around the milky way, then the milky way probably moving somehow and so on.

If we could somehow "get off" earth, "stand still" and let it "float away", would time would appear to move faster?

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If we could somehow "get off" earth, "stand still" and let it "float away", would time would appear to move faster?

A qualified yes, but it depends which time you mean by "time would appear to move faster". If you were "still", then those observed in motion would appear to have time pass more slowly.

Astronauts who spend time on the international space station age slightly less than people on earth (by 0.007 seconds behind for every 6 months) - time on earth goes faster than for them relative to those of us "stationary" on earth.

When two observers are in relative uniform motion and uninfluenced by any gravitational mass, the point of view of each will be that the other's (moving) clock is ticking at a slower rate than the local clock. The faster the relative velocity, the greater the magnitude of time dilation. This case is sometimes called special relativistic time dilation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_dilation

(The whole Wikipedia "Time Dilation" article is worth reading)

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In any given reference frame you have a velocity vector that's some part space and some part time but has magnitude 1. It's just rotated.

There's nowhere to "stand still" in the universe. But if you pick a reference frame where you're moving less fast in space your velocity has more of a time component to make up for it. If you pick one where you move very quickly in space (maybe one that doesn't follow the Earth's orbit) then you have less motion in time. That observer sees you experience less time.

And if they pick a reference frame where you move the speed of light - where your velocity vector is fully in space; with '1' for space and '0' for time - they don't see you experience any time.

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There's no way to stand still per se, but we can tell the difference between someone who accelerates and someone who doesn't - that's the resolution of the "twin paradox". So if one person travels around in a circle and their twin stays still (by magically floating above the earth without following its rotation, or by staying suspended at a particular point in the earth's orbit for a year while the earth goes around), then they have accelerated less than their twin and should therefore have aged slightly more.

What I don't understand is: does this still apply under General Relativity, or does proximity to the massive earth redefine acceleration?

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