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Sticks and Brains - Palo Alto - iOS Engineer - Remote Possible

Looking for an experienced iOS engineer to help us iterate on Lynk Messenger (http://lynkmessenger.com), a messaging app that enables people to connect or start groups with anyone in the same room.

Current team has years of experience growing one of the biggest messaging apps on the planet. We're iterating quickly and need help speeding things up further. Remote OK, local preferred.

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Sticks and Brains - Palo Alto - iOS Engineer - Remote Possible

Looking for an experienced iOS engineer to help us iterate on our bluetooth-powered messaging application: Lynk Messenger (http://lynkmessenger.com)

Current team has years of experience scaling one of the biggest messaging apps on the planet. We're iterating quickly and need help speeding things up further.

Remote OK, local preferred.

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May I ask you, how do you plan to monetize?

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SEEKING FREELANCERS -- Remote OK (We're based in Hong Kong, something within a few time-zones is preferable)

We're a mobile communications startup based out of HK (both founders are technical guys from the valley, though). We launched an iOS app called Lynk Messenger in September and our Android version is on the way. Looking to hire freelancers with iOS or Android experience to help us accelerate development on both platforms.

Contact: zach@lynkmessenger.com

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Lynk is a messaging app that uses Bluetooth to identify all other users around you and lets you direct message them or create group chats of any size.

It's not anonymous or mass group like Firechat, so you can tune in to trust-worthy sources of information and keep track of your friends or people you meet at the protest.

Does not use GPS to identify your location, and all traffic is encrypted over the wire. Does require a network connection, though.

Disclaimer: I'm co-founder of Lynk and was at the protests in HK last night. Happy to answer any questions for anybody interested in the tool.

http://www.lynkmessenger.com

edit: anyone in Hong Kong right now and interested in getting in touch, my email is in my profile

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This article does nothing to convince me that singing or playing math games with my young kids has a causal link to better math, science, or reading performance. Those both seem like signs of parents who are generally involved and likely correlate with lots of other constructive activities throughout the child's life (like caring about how they're doing in school) that could be the real reason for why the kids do better at a later age.

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The article you link to and quote, while saying grades are less important than Google thought, goes on to say that progressive Google after doing this study and at least partially implementing its new system "Last week...hired 6 people who had a below 3.0 GPA." 6 out of an estimated 200 weekly hires. That's a far far cry from D student = A student and nobody can tell the difference. Also, all of the direct quotations from Google people in the article talk about years spent in academia, degrees like doctorates, and interviews being the poor predictors. Some of the best programmers I know dropped out of high school. Doesn't mean I couldn't tell apart a room of A students from D students or that I couldn't use the A students better for many jobs I might need to fill.

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"That's a far far cry from D student = A student and nobody can tell the difference."

That's what the results found. Google just didn't change their hiring policy accordingly.

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Any citations for this? I can buy that this is the case for some jobs, from some school districts, for many students, across a certain distribution of grades, some number of years after graduation. I have a hard time believing that a D student who barely passed college will do just as well in a new consulting job as an A student, simply because the A student probably has actually learned a hell of a lot more useful information.

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Same with the iPhone 4s, though it tried to download the .js file first and didn't start working until I hit back. Load time was also much longer on the iPhone 4 over the same connection. Low framerate is hard to play through :/

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I built a somewhat similar product http://www.dexy.tv but it only links to 'legit' content (netflix, hulu, amazon, etc).

nddrylliog, send me an email if you're interested in potentially collaborating so you can list both kinds of content. Really like what you've done on the UI side.

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Do any torrent sites have affiliate links to legit content like Amazon? That seems like a good opportunity. If someone searches for a movie torrent, the movie might be available on Amazon (DVD or streaming) even if no torrents are found. And, more interestingly, someone might search for a movie torrent but see they can stream it from Amazon right now for just $5 without waiting for a torrent download.

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Without patents, drug research and development would have to be nationalized. The costs are enormous and drug prices drop 90% in the US after patent expiration. I would rather have new drugs and high prices for a few years than no new drugs at all or nationalized drug r&d.

I think the HN community's approach is wrong: patent abolishment isn't optimal, heavy patent reform is. Patent terms should be regulated and adapted in each industry like the Fed Funds Rate, not like the 10 commandments. Software is definitely an example of where they should be abolished, though.

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The reason drugs are so expensive to develop is the FDA testing. So instead of patents the FDA can just enforce a rule to not allow generic drugs unless they've gone through the same rigorous testing process the original guy did.

This is probably something the FDA should do anyway. Generic drug makers can look at a drug's signature, but there are so many other variables that can affect how a drug performs (quality control of the factory, quality of ingredients, recipe, procedure, etc.) that the FDA should require generic makers to go through the same testing process because they're different drugs.

The generic drug makers will have less overall expenses to bring a new drug to market (because someone already figured out a particular protein sequence that works in XYZ manner), but the original inventor will have time to milk the market as the first-to-market, encouraging innovation, and we can still get rid of our awful mess of a patent system.

Generally if you've built up a whole system (like the patent system), and it's really only beneficial for a select few (pharma), then maybe it'd be better to design a different system just for them (like the one proposed above) and don't make everyone else suffer the consequences.

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The FDA can also go overboard. Recently (~1.5 years ago) they seized 'birthing pools' as 'untested medical devices.' These are basically inflatable pools for women that want to have water births. To give some context, the operating table in a hospital does not qualify as a medical device (and therefore no FDA testing), but apparently inflatable pools that women give birth in require FDA testing.

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And drug research is largely nationalized. Drugs for "important" diseases are typically discovered by academic researchers and the R&D of a pharma company is either focused on a) how to scale up production of the drug b) how to market the drug c) drugs to cure lifestyle issues and psychological issues. Anything else is too risky or requires too long of an investment timeline.

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I agree. The universe isn't so perfect a place that we can consistently count on all-or-nothing strategies. Sometimes we have to get a little messy to devise a working system. Drug research is a great example of an industry where patents really are necessary to promote the progress of science.

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> Drug research is a great example of an industry where patents really are necessary to promote the progress of science.

It's too easy to say it this way. Any data to show us why the case of the pharma is so different from others ? The costs involved in the pharm industry depend heavily on: - government regulation - expected returns

It's not evolving in any kind of "free market" at all. It's a very poor example to use to justify patents.

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Good point, enough reform in this area may make patents totally unnecessary. I shouldn't have called it a good example without knowing more about it. However, my intuition is that there could exist a situation or industry in which patents are justified. We should be careful not to dismiss them wholesale, and instead should only dismiss them in areas where we can find superior alternatives.

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Some drug researchers might disagree.

Open Source Drug Discovery - http://www.osdd.net/

Research article on PLoS; "A Kernel for Open Source Drug Discovery in Tropical Diseases" - http://www.plosntds.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjourn...

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Drug research and development is largely nationalised, at least if we are talking about drugs for preventing or curing the most virulent diseases and not about stuff like viagra.

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Viagra was a by-product/side-effect of a (ineffective) drug for angina and hypertension. I'm not sure how much UK government money was involved in that work, but I'm assuming a lot, as we're generally all for that kind of thing.

Also of relevance, the UK patent on using a chemical that gives you an erection as a cure for impotence was thrown out for being obvious. But the patents on how to mass manufacture it are still in effect.

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That's cool, but given the subject matter it is hard to treat it with anything other than absolutely no, you-know-what.

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