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> They've no doubt asked themselves why, after so many years, are programmers still programming by the mere editing of dumb text files?

While I've thought that there might be interesting ways of editing code before, I have literally never once asked myself why programmers are "still programming" with text files. All things considered, structured text files are a pretty darn good way of describing program behavior.

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Because it's by its nature arbitrary. After all of these years (I've been developing since iPhone OS 3), they still have problems managing developer expectations.

Even if Apple is predictably bad about this, each instance of them bringing the hammer down is still a surprise, because that's the nature of the problem.

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Doesn't apply to iCloud/IAP

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IAP transfers fine - iCloud may be another matter.

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A relative of mine with credible information tells me HP is apparently losing a bunch of ground in the server market because of low build quality. HP's trying to compete on prices by slashing them, but their deployments are just that bad.

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It's been a real shame to watch the decline of HP.

In the early 90's when I was just starting out in IT, their brand was very highly regarded, especially their laser printers which phenomenal workhorses.

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They also made a huge bet on Itanium which obviously didn't pay off. HP, along with Intel, has arguably recovered from that strategic decision, but a huge amount of money and corporate energy went into running that play. If that money and energy had gone into other things, HP might well be in a better overall place today.

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In one of the companies I worked in the past, we found that for a similar server configuration, Dell provides lower quote than HP and others almost always. So I doubt, HP can compete on prices with Dell in servers and support.

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Ouch. They used to offer some awesome workstations a few years back, but the restrictions on peripherals were insane - I mean, what idiot decided to implement whitelists on processors and PCIE graphics adapters?

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If you want to use the feature in Eclipse, it's been around for at least a decade: http://help.eclipse.org/luna/index.jsp?topic=%2Forg.eclipse....

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This might out me as overly cynical, but I'd go a step further and say that baby boomers don't have to throw coworkers under the bus because our younger generation got collectively thrown under the bus by our/their politicians already.

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That's a little harsh. The job market has changed, there is less of a hierarchy for people to climb. Thanks to technology. There is more competition for the better jobs thanks to globalisation.

These are two things which are not the fault of boomers.

Millennieals need to innovative out of their situation, change the game. Something like their own political party.

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As one of your customers, I've already committed $X to my instance. I would be delighted to get 2x resources compared to .5x cost.

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Thanks. That's good feedback. We are working hard on the upgrades, but I have been way too slow :(

I do observe that there seems to be a price floor phenomena; for any customer, any price below $x is largely equivalent; they will go for the best thing they can get for $x, so providing a better product helps, but lowering the price below $x doesn't change the equation for that customer. Of course, $x is different for each person, so lowering your price does get you customers who had a lower value for $x.

I've already lost most of the customers that had a value for $x that was greater than what they were paying me at this point; I'm not losing customers nearly as quickly as I predicted. Right now, if I screw something up, of course, I lose the effected customers; I mean, it's really dramatic. You always lose some customers when you screw something up, but I lose way more now than when my prices were lower than the credible competition. But other than that, things have largely stabilized.

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I should note that I'm a hobbyist/enthusiast type of customer; if you're losing business on price grounds, I can definitely see where a price cut would help.

(Also, it doesn't help that the wiki is crufty and out of date, and boot menu, last time I rebooted, was still on CentOS 5.)

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> I should note that I'm a hobbyist/enthusiast type of customer; if you're losing business on price grounds, I can definitely see where a price cut would help.

I think similar principles govern business spending, only $x for them is usually higher. I have a couple of business co-lo customers who have been customers for like half a decade; some of them are still using the hardware they came in on. They could save a lot of money by upgrading hardware (and thus reducing their footprint) or even moving to "the cloud" at this point, because while co-locating modern hardware is cheaper than "The Cloud" - co-locating ancient hardware is not.

The idea is that it works for them, so they aren't going to fuck with it. I'd bet money, though, that if I fucked something up and caused them a serious outage, they'd be gone pretty quick.

>(Also, it doesn't help that the wiki is crufty and out of date, and boot menu, last time I rebooted, was still on CentOS 5.)

I just want to acknowledge those problems. We only have vague plans for the wiki, but we're actively working on upgrading the rescue image and the hypervisor (which, I imagine, is the part of the boot menu you are complaining about.) - these changes will probably not be implemented until our switchover to the new ganeti-based system, but... that should be soonish.

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That's their hope - after 1.0, they want to open-source it.

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No, Android does not have any of this because Apache Harmony was killed by the Java 7 API changes. Namely, the documentation was no longer open, and Oracle withheld the TCK, effectively killing Harmony by making it uncertifiable as a Java implementation.

Harmony didn't die per se - It was killed by Oracle. Google's rationale for engineering a Java-ish VM with Java APIs was only legal up until Java 6.

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Disclaimer: ex-Facebooker.

> Similarly, there’s a logic to giving Paper some more features, or “bloat,” as engineers derisively call such additions. Although it’s awkward to cram more information into a hidden tab on Paper — if birthdays are so important, why aren’t they in Paper’s main news feed? — the additional information also helps Paper live up to its billing as a place for news and stories from your social graph. For some people, birthdays and invitations are a vital part of that news stream, even if, for others, such information is trivial or better placed in the core Facebook app.

1. The Events and Birthday features were planned before Paper was announced. It's not feature bloat, it's a "second release" feature planned ahead of time.

2. Paper is optimized for a high-quality reading experience, especially longer content, as evidenced by the meticulous attention to detail in the text rendering and the horizontal scrolling. Birthdays would take up a lot of space in the story stream for relatively little content (and how would you order it within the feed, anyway?). Look at the birthday indicator on Facebook WWW, and tell me a name and three words are worth a screen-sized card in the stream. I would be very skeptical.

3. Birthdays arrive regularly and in chronological order. The Notifications jewel is the best place for these things - people also visit it regularly and there's a chronological ordering to it.

As for Nearby, the argument is flimsy. Changing strategy doesn't have to mean sabotaging in-flight development. Perhaps Nearby was developed before or during planning for the shift to the new strategy.

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Am I the only person who thinks the body text on the shrunken preview cards looks terrible?

edit: was reacting to "meticulous attention to detail in the text rendering"

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