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> the Daodejing being the second most translated book in history after the Bibl

I know this is difficult to quantify accurately, but Wikipedia lists Daodejing behind the Little Prince and Pinocchio

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_literary_works_by_nu...


Just to nit-pick, I think he meant number of different translations, not number of languages it was translated into. I doubt there are multiple translations of Little Prince into each of those languages.

What makes it important for this book is that the source is from classical Chinese which is far more ambiguous than say the French that Little Prince was written in.

Consider the first sentence: 道可道非常道 名可名非常名. It's written as two parallel structures, with 道 replaced by 名 in the second half. In both halves, 道/名 could be functioning as a verb or a noun in any of its usages.

Let's consider 道: amongst other things, 道 as a noun could mean road, path, way, principle, reason, skill, art, but also as a general class of objects like rivers, barriers, etc. 道 as a verb can mean to travel, to say, to express, etc. And of course, as a result of this text, 道 stands as a shortcut for the entire text - more than just a principle, but The Principle, more than just a way, but The Way.

Even the other words aren't simple. 可 is often just thought of as part of 可以 to mean may nowadays, but 可 itself means can, may, able to, to approve, to permit, to suit, certainly, etc. 非常 is an odd one, as I'm sure the modern day meaning (extremely) completely throws you off track. 非 on its own means not, wrong, to not be, to blame, etc. 常 means always, ever, constant, often, frequently, common, general, etc.

I'm not saying any of these examples I'm giving now are good translations, but you could, for example, have translations that are diverse and extreme as "the road which could be traveled is not often traveled", "to travel on something that could be a road is rarely the correct way", "travelling on something that might be a road but was not always a road", "the road you may travel on is often not a road" or "the road you may travel on is never the right way". None of these are like any existing translations I've seen, but that was done on purpose, because they're all legitimate (but unlikely) interpretations of the original.

If you look at the meanings given in this translation: "The way you can go isn’t the real way." In the same repo, Jane English's version is "The Tao that can be told is not the eternal Tao." My bilingual version translates it as "The Dao that can be trodden is not the enduring and unchanging Dao" (James Legge, 1815-1897).

You can see that the linked-to translation has chosen a quite different approach to at least two others. Which is correct? Perhaps all of them, perhaps none of them. There's a reason why these texts are considered so enlightening - there's no one correct answer, you have to really meditate on the meaning and come to your own conclusion.

But anyway, back to the point - the nature of the text means that if you're reading a translation it'll miss a lot of the inherent ambiguities of the text and instead direct your thinking down specific lines. That's why, for this text the number of different translations is more important than number of languages it's translated into.


Thanks for the very interesting list.

I was expecting Euclid's Elements to be up there. Perhaps the filter "literary work" disqualified it.

If you all pardon an off topic digression, the nebulosity of the definition of a straight line in elements has always bothered me. I wanted something free of reference to a physical artifact (straight edge, taught rope etc) and free of algebra. Its sometimes defined in terms of reflections or rotations or translations, but then that begs the question what is a straight axis (or direction of translation). Playfair's version is almost satisfactory. The standard I guess is Hilbert's.


> If you all pardon an off topic digression...

IMHO, Euclid's definition of a straight line in today's terms would be "a line that has the same direction on its entire length". His definition of a plane angle would be "a plane angle is the difference between the directions of two straight lines that have a common end in one point".

What are Playfair's and Hilbert's definitions?


The problem I have with that version of Euclid's definition is that direction is not defined.

Playfair interprets Euclid as follows, I am using my own words here, a straight line is that figure which has the property that if it intersects its moved copy at 2 points it necessarily coincides with it everywhere. "Movement" is undefined, it has to be an isometry.

Hilbert's is more abstract and based upon sets. Line is a primitive (undefined name) that interacts with two other undefined names (points and planes) according defined relations (lies on, lies between and is_congruent).

More here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hilbert%27s_axioms


I have tried quite many such apps and keep returning to Tiddlywiki (https://tiddlywiki.com/). It is not perfect, and the lack of hierarchy can be both a blessing and a curse. It uses flat-files which can impact performance and be more cumbersome than a database. Also, the integration with external files is a bit clumsy.

However, the main strength is customizability. Various data is best presented in various ways, and separating data/content and presentation/template/layout while keeping them tightly integrated is incredibly powerful.

Cudos for thinking long-term with SQLite, avoiding lock-in is crucial for these kinds of apps!


Tiddlywiki[1] + Syncthing[2] + Wireguard[3] = "Cloud? Why?"

[1] https://tiddlywiki.com/

[2] https://syncthing.net/

[3] https://www.wireguard.com/


How is it different to Obsidian?


* Tiddlywiki has existed for many years (first version came 20 years ago, the rewritten version left beta 10 years ago), and longevity and backward compatibility are key values for the developers

* A single-file Tiddlywiki is a single file that only requires a web browser to be used (e.g., you can email it to someone and they can just open it)

* Tiddlywiki is extremely customizable, much more than obsidian. It's almost hard to describe, but you can make very interesting things with just basic knowledge about html and css.

To cite myself:

> the problem with TiddlyWiki is that it's hard to describe since its so flexible. I have a few local tiddlywikis that I use for catalogues and note taking/knowledge base. The note taking was inspired by another HN comment [3] that introduced Drift [4,5], which includes features such as tabs for backlinks, keywords, and freelinks. But you may also find the Projectify edition [6] interesting or one cloning Roam Research [7].

[3] https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=25305527

[4] Source: https://github.com/bmann/drift-tiddlywiki-template/tree/mast...

[5] Demo: https://ramirosalas.com/

[6] https://thaddeusjiang.github.io/Projectify/

[7] https://rr-tw5.github.io/


Joe Armstrong of Erlang fame was a big fan of tiddlywiki, and he met up with the creator to give a talk together about tiddlywiki: https://youtube.com/watch?v=Uv1UfLPK7_Q

“Joe Armstrong & Jeremy Ruston - Intertwingling the Tiddlywiki with Erlang | Code Mesh LDN 18”


The tiddlywiki site is a tiddlywiki document. That alone tells you the difference.


That one is optimized to be a web site and the other is optimized to be a personal note-taking platform? ;P


A markdown document (e.g. from Obsidian) can be hosted as easily.


Yes, but the tiddlywiki file is the entire wiki. You've perhaps tried the dataview plugin for obsidian? Tiddlywiki is built on a similar idea, but much more flexible and powerful. However, tiddlywiki doesn't support in-text definition of fields (as far as I know)


It's a single-file self-hosting wiki.

Rather different from a closed-source desktop file editor.


Children getting lost can also be in real danger, not only psychologically pain. It's just six month since a seven year old died in Norway after getting lost in the woods; he was hiking with his parents and wasn't off their sight for long, but a large search party was still unable to find him in time. It's rare, but we must also remember that all the "success stories" in this thread suffers from survivorship bias


Yes, it was indeed unethical and there are many moral and legal arguments that the skeleton should receive a burial, but the stealing was arranged by a Scottish surgeon and not the British government. It was removed from display last year. There seems to be some additional legal issues too, at least for the board of the museum: "since 1799 its trustees had been legally bound to preserve the collection of John Hunter – the pioneering Scottish surgeon and anatomist who the museum is named after – in its entirety" [1]

[1] https://web.archive.org/web/20231127211244/https://www.thegu...


it’s not possible to be legally bound to commit a crime, so if those “legal issues” (nice euphemism) are great enough then it doesn’t matter what some dead dudes agreed to. the contract is toilet paper from 400 years ago, even if you really like the dudes and the current state of affairs.


And the light-weight https://feather.wiki/ (which is not too different from tiddlywiki)


After having tried quite many note taking tools, I think Tiddlywiki is superior regarding transclusions [1]

[1] https://groktiddlywiki.com/read/#Transclusions


Oh I just gave this a read through -- this is really neat, thanks for sharing, Karen. I have also been a fan of Tiddlywiki but always felt a bit sad about its apparent lack of support for mathematics typesetting. Although I am not too familiar with Tiddlywiki so perhaps I've been mistaken.

How do you like it? Do you have a wiki up somewhere?

Cheers!


Thanks for reading through and engaging!

For mathematical typesetting, you need the KaTeX plugin [1] (installing an plugin is simply to drag-and-drop it to your own wiki). There is also a plugin for doing calculations in TiddlyWiki but I haven't used it personally [2]

I like it a lot - the problem with TiddlyWiki is that it's hard to describe since its so flexible. I have a few local tiddlywikis that I use for catalogues and note taking/knowledge base. The note taking was inspired by another HN comment [3] that introduced Drift [4,5], which includes features such as tabs for backlinks, keywords, and freelinks.

But you may also find the Projectify edition [6] interesting or one cloning Roam Research [7]

[1] https://tiddlywiki.com/plugins/tiddlywiki/katex/

[2] https://chronicles.wiki/TiddlyWikiFormula/

[3] https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=25305527

[4] Source: https://github.com/bmann/drift-tiddlywiki-template/tree/mast...

[5] Demo: https://ramirosalas.com/

[6] https://thaddeusjiang.github.io/Projectify/

[7] https://rr-tw5.github.io/


Public universities?


What is the current status of drugs where the major contribution is from AI? Are they protectable like other drugs? Or are they more copyless like AI art and so on?


> Nobody buys them

Are you sure? A growth from 1% of sold mobile phones in 2021Q4 to 3% in 2023Q4 doesn't seem too bad

https://9to5google.com/2024/02/29/googel-pixel-q4-2023-north...


> The EMR, and therefore most note-taking, is not as value add to the patient, or doctor. Its just the only way the doctor will be paid.

I don't think this is true as proper note-taking and documentation is required by law in many countries where the doctor is not paid per patient/procedure


Digital records are valuable for health in several cases, for example, when the patient needs or wants all their records.


OK, but you need to clarify your statement. As you said,

>>> note taking and documentation is required by law.

So then, the EMR not a value add, which is also what I wrote. It just so happens that in the US the primary reason is to get paid, and its also why some doctors still eke out a living without an EMR (but still with some kind of paper medical files)


Do EMRs improve the standard of care?


Big time.

In some cases where hospitals do paper charting, it can be mis charted.

or, there can be issues with not recording medication as being given or not, and the patient can miss their dose because a nurse thinks it was given. There is some cases where such confusion is tolerated depending on the patient.


>>> or, there can be issues with not recording medication as being given or not, and the patient can miss their dose because a nurse thinks it was given.

Partially true. First, there's no need to record anything in any EMR, this is a big misunderstanding. The act of sending the script is recording it itself. There's no need to do data entry in EMR.

You can test this by simply attempting to send eScripts outside of the EMR. PBM systems like surescripts will alert the provider as he's prescribing in any other 3rd party system of any problems (multiple scripts of same meds, reactions, etc).

Even a paper script needs to be adjudicated via PBM by the pharmacy, which means there's a PBM record already the moment that script is created and picked up. That's how most doctors and pharmacies know whether pts are picking up their meds.

Now if a doctor is fully on paper based then you do have a problem because there's no feedback to a paper record IF the doctor is failing to log into the PBM system to check for drugs dispensed. In this case, the EMR may appear superior on this front, but it also introduces its own set of problems, such as a very common one - patients missing their scripts because the pharmacy is out of meds, causing multiple scripts being sent and back and forths with busy doctors. This is never a problem with a paper script.

Perhaps one of the very few value adds is turning the MD scribble into something legible, but that's something that can easily be solved without any click, or an EMR in the middle .


> First, there's no need to record anything in any EMR, this is a big misunderstanding. The act of sending the script is recording it itself. There's no need to do data entry in EMR.

Not quite. Hospital EMRs now have barcoding and scanning, for timed doses being delivered an to make sure they were - saw it first hand in the past year.

This is a shadow working culture issue, not a technical one.

Hospital workplace cultures can be quite toxic, and that plays out varying degrees of horrible for certain segments of the population 60 percent of the time, every time.

In hospitals, prescriptions are administered usually by a nurse.

Since it's a problem that can be casually looked away from because it doesn't impact one group, it can be downplayed.


Absolutely. They can allow providers to easily track their adherence to Patient Quality measures which directly affects their income.


The question is whether they improve the standard of care.

Quality measures produce numbers so bean-counters are satisfied at CMS.

For example: Before i was not submitting any quality measures, but my patient satisfaction was sky high, and i had the lowest complications for years.

Now i report quality measures, but as a result of documentation requisites and reporting requirements, i have less time to see patients , and therefore make more mistakes.

My quality measures are good because I'm talking to patients about quitting smoking and getting leaner - but i was already doing that previously. Now objectively, since I now have less time due to EMR requisites, my patients are worse off than before and it shows with slightly more complications my patient's aren't as happy as their waiting times are longer (and getting worse too).


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