Hacker Newsnew | comments | show | ask | jobs | submit | joblessjunkie's comments login

I might not mind if Valve just made all the games available this way. No download, no waiting: a button in the Steam client starts streaming the game immediately.

-----


OnLive tried to do this and went bankrupt recently, IIRC.

-----


I think they already do. You begin the download and after it has downloaded some portion of the game you can launch it and the stream the rest.

-----


I didn't know about this. Which games?

-----


Blizzard games also do this, you usually only have to download about 25% to start playing

-----


Not Steam, but Ubisoft did this for instance with the latest Far Cry and Assassins Creed.

-----


Biggest win I see is you could even be rid of the steam client.

-----


would you pay $2-$3/hour for such a service from steam?

-----


Probably not. $0.50-$1/hour, absolutely.

-----


Same here. Assuming you game for 5 hours a week that works out to be under $300/year. Much cheaper than buying and keeping a gaming PC up to date.

-----


If you only game for 5 hours a week buy a console and save $270 next year. ( minus $30 for an XBL or PS Plus subscription for online play and free games ) Also it's locally rendered thus no input lag and you don't need to tie up your entire internet pipe when you want to game.

-----


I think this ignores a lot of other points.

Console requires a high quality TV.

Console may require controller or other accessories to play local multiplayer.

Console games are significantly more expensive, especially for a more casual gamer.

The games they like to play 5 hours a week may only be available on PC.

-----


I get poor service, crummy old modems, and glacial support from my commercial internet provider. If those are your concerns for socialized broadband, then you should already be concerned.

No one is mandating municipal ISPs. The claim is simply that there should be competition in markets, and in many cities (like mine) there is no competition by law.

My city does a great job with providing me with cheap electricity, clean water, and emergency services. Just because a group of people work for local government rather than a giant corporation doesn't make them any more or less lazy or evil.

Perhaps if my city starts investigating a municipal ISP, my one and only commercial broadband provider will finally get of their asses and upgrade my bandwidth, my uptime, and the terrible modem they made me pay for.

-----


Headphone surround sound (including recordings made with a binaural "head" microphone) can be very convincing until the listener moves his head.

The sounds don't change to match the head motion, and this kills the illusion.

-----


Absolutely correct. I'm also working on real-time compensation with the Oculus Headtracker ;) but that won't be ready until a few months from now ...

-----


I have poor vision.

This website uses a herd-to-read font and disables pinch-to-zoom (an essential feature) on my iPad.

-----


This website is even difficult to read on a regular desktop browser (too wide, downvoted comments increasingly impossible to read causing eye strain). I recommend using your own content script with Chrome. This may not help on your iPad but on Android you can use Firefox with your own userscript. It's the only way I can tolerate it.

It would probably take a competent someone a few hours to fix the readability issues of this site but they just never get around to it.

Edit:

Here's a link to what all comments look like for me, even if they're downvoted:

http://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/v5zcn9n4vg4m3cn/2014-06-1...

I also disabled scores and voting because I dislike that stuff.

This is the home page:

http://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/sicqor50smsl4hx/2014-06-1...

-----


joblessjunkie means the original article's site.

Pinch-to-zoom works fine on HackerNews on an iPad, and the HackerNews font is nothing unusual.

Regarding HN being too wide, why don't you narrow your browser window?

Personally, I like the fact the traditional web design in which HN adjusts the line to screen width rather than imposing a width.

-----


Hm, I’d be happy with some max-width:50em or so on the actual text. Now if only Firefox had a built-in way to apply custom user stylesheets to websites…

-----


It's not built-in but the Stylish extension does that.

-----


Claudius is being sarcastic. http://kb.mozillazine.org/index.php?title=UserContent.css

-----


Sarcastic, yes, but mostly relating to Opera 12.x’s UserCSS features; I didn’t actually know about userContent.css. Thanks for the pointer, although it seems to be impossible to only apply it to certain sites?

-----


@-moz-document url-prefix() or @-moz-document domain() ? https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/@document http://forums.mozillazine.org/viewtopic.php?t=286866

-----


Yay, thank you for the handholding, it actually seems to work quite nicely :-)

-----


Chrome however is deprecating this feature. Stylish will be required.

-----


greasemonkey can too, with the added benefit of being able to script the page as well.

-----


Personally, I like the fact the traditional web design in which HN adjusts the line to screen width rather than imposing a width.

Its just that it ruins the experience on mobile devices because you can't resize the window and zooming doesn't reflow the text.

for what it's worth, I don't really have a problem with it. They provide an API and there are like 90 billion ycombinator mobile apps to choose from which do a better job.

-----


ah, it's a mobile issue. I strictly use a desktop for HN and was confused about why people were complaining.

-----


The Original article seems to mis-quote browser marketshare. They have IE10 listed as 3% of the market and "Other" as 36%? And all the IE's combined for 19% market share? Everything I've seen (except the original article) list the IE's at a combined market share somewhere in the neighborhood of 50-70%., with IE8 still having a dominant 15-20%.

-----


I'm not sure what the global numbers are at right now, but Microsoft and Google have roughly 30% each in America.

-----


See my other comment for the reason for discrepancy.

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=7883973

-----


> Regarding HN being too wide, why don't you narrow your browser window?

Narrow my browser window because this one site makes it difficult to read? I could do that, or I could just use a content script and leave my browser at the width I prefer. I maximize my browser for distraction free reading.

-----


Can you explain to me the issue with it being too wide?

I may not be understanding it, because I just maximized the window and I don't see any issue, really.

-----


Eight,I'm sure I'm going to resize my browser just to read HN and then maximize it again when I navigate away to a site which uses a sane content width. No need to be an apologist. I like the content here,but the design in many respects,is awful (expired links anyone?).

-----


I have no issues whatsoever with the width/layout issues, but the expires links... yes.

-----


Oftentimes, narrowing HN below 1280px is still not enough as the content then scrolls sideways, so there is a very good argument for putting a width on content that doesn't adjust to the window size properly.

-----


HN doesn't reflow/wrap text to window size on Android Chrome or Firefox. Only the pre-KitKat "Browser" works on HN.

-----


Opera kept that feature, it works.

-----


I just downloaded Opera for Android because of this, but no, it does not work as the old android browser did. Or do I need to adjust a setting for this somewhere?

-----


I don't think joblessjunkie was talking about HN.

-----


On my desktop browser, I can only browse Hacker News with zoom at 150%.

-----


Just select the text of a downvoted comment to have readable colors

-----


HN is tiny and unreadable in default Android chrome.

-----


Hard to read downvoted comments is a feature not a usability bug.

Down voted comments are supposed to be hard for everyone to read.

-----


I don't think a screen reader would pick up the down-voted comments as different from other comments. So, it's still broken from an accessibility standpoint.

-----


Aural style sheets? Do they work?

-----


I think Emacspeak was the only screen reader that supported even just a limited subset of aural styles.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emacspeak

-----


Not just that but it's abusing statistics.

StatCounter attempts to measure browsing volume, not people using a particular browser.

Net Applications attempts to measure people using a browser, so IE9's reported share is three times higher, around 9%.

As an analogy, take the toothpaste market with only two players. Lets say 30% of people use Colgate and 70% use Crest. But for some reason the first group uses more toothpaste, so 60% of toothpaste sold in the market is Colgate and 40% is Crest.

Now, which one has a higher "marketshare"? Crest or Colgate?

It's funny how everyone gets so confused about this.

Anyway, Net Applications is the more apt comparison here because she's attempting to compare people having a disability, not the amount of browsing done by such people.

-----


> Now, which one has a higher "marketshare"? Crest or Colgate?

Trick question.

I can't answer that question until I've decided whether I want to be a Crest fan or a Colgate fan. Sort of like how I can't decide whether to measure smartphone market size by units shipped or dollars spent without first deciding whether I want to promote Android or iOS.

-----


I think that in this case, it's fair to compare the number of people who have a disability instead of the amount of browsing they do, because it speaks to the potential market.

Suppose that there was no technology to help blind people use computers. Then blind people would have 0% of browsing, but they're not 0% of the population -- should we create technology to help them even though they do no browsing? (Yes.)

-----


Regardless of if IE9 use is 3% or 9%, the point still stands. It's still an at least higher or comparable number of internet users that are ignored and marginalized by the workflows and decision-making of most internet app projects.

-----


To be fair, there is a large disclaimer:

> I'd like to start this post with a disclaimer: I don't know much about creating accessible websites.

-----


Exactly, it sort of re-inforces my point that when I was designing that site I didn't really think about it. I don't have to be an accessibility expert to discuss the fact that developers don't tend to create accessible sites!

-----


I really liked the first font from a design standpoint and found it quite readable! It's ridiculous you're being attacked for voicing a very valid concern on your own blog, because of your preferred font choice. A lot of the comments both on your blog and on here seem to almost be mocking the idea that sites should be accessible, by making an unwarranted personal attack against you, when you clearly state you were never even introduced to accessibility programming through formal education, like lots and lots of developers weren't ( myself included ).

Forcing programmers to jump through extra hoops (trying /em to learn on their own, and making well-intentioned changes but not knowing if its right or enough or effective) is not the way to increase knowledge and uptake of accessibility-minded-design as the standard.

It would be nice if designers were still able to make stylistic choices with regards to fonts and website colors, that may be less readable for some, but have it degrade easily to something more readable with a simple command or click of a button. Besides some roundabout ways i can think of, or using readability, im not sure how to do that easily though.

-----


It doesn't reinforce your point, it makes you look like a hypocrite.

-----


That's an unfair criticism. The author (and I, and the rest of us) are not focussing our efforts logically. We can see browser stats in server logs, but measuring disabled or impaired visitors' traffic is easy to overlook - servers don't collect this data point.

She's now raised the issue for a wider audience and this could only be hypocrisy if she held herself up as an example of how to do things correctly. She isn't, and says so right at the top of the article.

-----


Starting a conversation on your blog about a topic you don't know much about doesn't make you a hypocrite.

-----


Do you even know what that word means?

-----


It is an admission of the problem and a plea for help.

-----


You'll be pleased to know that the website works absolutely fine in IE9

-----


Here you go https://www.readability.com/articles/8jmyuikb

The article has horrible fonts.

-----


As with most JS-heavy websites, NoScript improves its readability. In this case, there are no shitty fonts.

-----


I use this bookmarklet (taken from Stack Exchange [0]) on webpages that disable pinch-to-zoom to re-enable it on iOS devices. Some pages crash Safari after using it and zooming for unknown reasons.

    javascript:document.querySelector('meta[name=viewport]').setAttribute('content','width=200,initial-scale=1.0,maximum-scale=10.0,user-scalable=1');
[0]: http://apple.stackexchange.com/questions/28391/how-can-i-for...

-----


I completely agree.

I wouldn't consider this an impairment, but my eyesight is changing (it is getting harder for me to work on a screen when I'm wearing glasses). This font is very hard to read!!

-----


She did say "we".

-----


I had a similar difficulty with reading the font. I opened the site in lynx and was surprised to discover that it was relatively well structured (easy to read/navigate).

-----


I agree, but the tu-quoque is not really helpful here.

-----


It has been changed on popular "HN" demand.

-----


the irony is palpable

-----


Did you read the article? There is no irony here, she immediately points out her lack of understanding of fundamental accessibility principles. That is why she wrote about how we as an industry allow that to happen (senior engineers who know nothing about catering to disability).

-----


sure there is. it's like an investigative journalist learning nothing (or failing to apply lessons learned) about good investigative journalism while writing about it.

another comparison would be like a professional driver admitting he knows nothing about hand brakes, writing an essay about why he knows nothing about them, how he can learn and be more knowledgeable about them...and then proceeding to drive 1,000 miles with the hand brake engaged.

i wouldn't expect her to learn or apply all of WAI-ARIA, but you'd think after doing so much research on the subject, she could change a simple font-family tag to help her case.

-----


Personal blog, slow your roll. Author said they were a professional software developer, not a professional writer.

-----


And she was more pointing out how most developers are not ever taught or required to make their projects accessible (at least by company standards if not legally)

-----


There are no gold plated connectors in a typical studio (exceptions for amateur home studios purchased from Guitar Center).

Most cabling in a studio is bulk copper wire from a giant spool, permanently soldered in place for reliability.

The only plugging happens at dedicated patch panels, which in my experience are old repurposed analog telephone patch bays that look as old and corroded as they are.

Gold connectors are for home enthusiasts with money to burn. The practical effect of the platings are so far below the noise floor (vs ground loops, EMF, amp noise) that it's irrelevant for audio work.

I've never seen a gold-plated XLR cable, which is usually the first link in every studio recording chain.

-----


Gold plated XLR. By Neutrik which is a reasonable brand. Your point still stands though - no one actually uses these.

http://www.neutrik.com/en/xlr/xx-14-series/nc3mxx-14-b-d

-----


If you walk up the notes of the major scale starting from your reference pitch, the fifth note in the scale will be the one that has the 3/2 pitch ratio.

-----


Ohloh shows Java holding steady for the last several years at about 10% of all commit activity in the open source world.

http://www.ohloh.net/languages/java

-----


It's also basically impossible to read on an iOS device.

-----


How did you manage this? I tried to switch to Basic HTML after the new compose box rolled out, but couldn't find the setting for it anywhere.

-----


Append &ui=html to the querystring.

It's an unadulterated Gmail 1.0 html-only UI. Very 2004.

Personally, if I try to use it for more than 30 seconds I want to die. But YMMV.

-----


Yes, US currency also smells very bad.

However, the US seems very aggressive about replacing worn bills. This may be related to the fact that so much of our currency goes in and out of automated machinery these days, and people don't hang on to cash very long.

Anecdotally, bills today seem much tidier than they did when I was a kid. Of the dozen bills in my pocket right now, none is older than 2006, and none are crumpled.

-----


100 RMB bills get replaced pretty quickly also; its rare to see an old one. 50 RMB bills can be more worn, and its kind of a pain because the DPRK counterfeiters usually go after these notes. Recently, they've caught on to this and have been replacing 50 RMB bills more often.

-----


1RMB notes are an abomination, and considering that there is a coin of that denomination I'm surprised they haven't been abolished. In my wallet now I have a couple of them dating from 1999. Dirty.

-----


They only mint 1RMB coins in the south (e.g. Shanghai). Beijing and the north have mainly paper bills, we do get coins for the subway, however. Coins are annoying if clean, since we aren't used to them.

-----

More

Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | DMCA | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: