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Smartphone sales were downright depressing prior to iPhone, despite Windows Phone, Symbian, Blackberry, and friends giving it a real shot. I guess you could say Blackberry was a success, but it wasn't really the same type of smartphone at all that we see post-iPhone. Tablet sales were basically non-existent prior to iPad, despite Microsoft and several OEMs' offerings.

These pieces always arise when Apple is ready to launch into a product category, but Apple rarely fails here. They have a lot of experience creating and expanding categories in which to make a lot of money. The only real "failure" I can think of is Apple TV, but I think even there they're not really "done" yet.

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Don't forget Pippin and Newton. Pippin - the Apple game console - did not have much to offer. Newton - their PDA - had some interesting tricks up its sleeve but suffered from shaky handwriting recognition.

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FireEye - NYC preferred - FULL-TIME

We are building an info security product driven by big data. If working on something that ingests more data per second than Twitter on just one of our customers sounds interesting, then ping me at (my HN username)@gmail.com.

We work in a lot of programming languages (from Python to Scala to Java to Go to Node/JavaScript) with a lot of really interesting problems to solve around performance, search, storage, scaling, and so on. We are looking for some engineers who are excited about chewing on big problems and solving them using whatever tools work best. If that sounds like you, ping me at the email I mentioned or on Twitter at @jm.

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I think we may also be looking for a Rails engineer and a front end engineer (those can both be remote!) on a sister project, so ping me if that sounds interesting also!

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I just want to say I've used your products and they are truly excellent. You guys provide a much-needed service to the world.

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Wow, thanks! Glad they're helping folks out. :)

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These served me well when I owned a consultancy: http://msabundle.com

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I've also used these quite a bit. They are sufficient for about 50% of clients. The other want to use their boilerplate.

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There is actually, and it's nice! http://cratejoy.com

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Hook that into http://bride.ru and you've got a winner!

More seriously, automating the process of harvesting credit card numbers and signing them up for monthly billing, then taking a cut, is evil genius.

Even more seriously, the sex-trade people were way ahead on this, by happily offering canceling customers refund checks with mind-blowingly dirty names on them to discourage deposit.

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The Prags' deal and commitment to actually, you know, helping their authors is unfortunately a beautiful unique snowflake amongst publishers. I've been involved with projects with all the major tech publishers in some form or another, and they're all horrible terms (usually 12-15% of proceeds [i.e., post-costs] or less).

Even worse, they do almost no work for you these days. The editors they find are 99% completely non-technical and on contract, so they're just trying to squeeze hours out of reviewing something they know zilch about. The publisher will stick your book on a website and put it in bookstores, but outside of that, don't count on any marketing or sales help. PROTIP: They don't want big reputation authors because they're better writers. They want them so they can do minimal work and ride off the authors' social media and conference speaking coattails to sell copies with next to no investment. Then they'll sell your work to places like Safari for a pittance (on the order of the cost of about 100 print copies if I recall correctly) and give you as small of a piece of the pie as humanly possible. I understand they're a business trying to survive these days, but seriously, the whole thing needs to be re-evaluated.

As GP or someone said, self-publishing is way more profitable if you can find a niche that's not being served. I've made about 10x more money off my self-published works as I have my "published" works, and that's a very sad statistic given how big the book industry really is. Not saying all publishers will end up with figures like that, but the industry as a whole is wrapped up in an author-hostile business model and a crappy, slow process.

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That must be one really dumb employee at your particular store. I use their Internet without making purchases for hours at a time pretty often and no one says a word to me. I buy a good bit of stuff from there on other occasions, so I don't feel bad about it, but I've never been hassled or anything by their coffee shop folks.

I'd report them to their manager if I were you. They're costing the store money.

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My experience with that tactic has been that if every seat is full (e.g. Saturday at 11 am in a university town), and a paying customer with no seat complains there are obviously non-paying students reading books clearly not from B$N, then they'll ask the person least likely to fuss to move.

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Indeed. Most of the Cafe areas in B&N's have a specific sign that the seating is for those buying food and coffee. Typically there is seating elsewhere in the store for just sitting and reading. If the Cafe area is full, and you are not buying, or have not bought food or coffee, you are preventing them from selling it.

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Pay $550? Why? Apple will do any repair for like $399 (or at least they used to) so long as you didn't mind it being sent out. I guess maybe that answers my question if you needed it back immediately. :)

For future reference, if they botched it the first time, you should call Apple corporate and yell. They messed something up in a repair for my work laptop once and it took one phone call to get a new one immediately. I had to make it clear that it was their fault and I had to have it for work and school, but they were super accommodating (and the new one worked like a charm).

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Just a tip, but I don't think you have to do this if you use iTunes to upgrade. I know it's a bummer, but don't let that keep you from upgrading.

I think I had to do it for iOS 7 actually. 16GB ain't what it used to be. :)

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For future reference, it really sounds like InfluxDB might be a perfect fit for you. I've been trying to find a reason to use it myself, but we don't do a lot of time-series stuff at work (right now at least).

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I don't know the addresses you're looking at, but it's about $20 from Mill Rd in Alexandria to DCA (I've taken the route a ton of times), which is a much shorter distance than to NE D.C. I don't know if $71 is entirely accurate, but it's definitely more than you're quoting.

EDIT: Just quoted it. It's about $42 in light traffic, about $69 in heavy traffic (from the hotel I stay in Alexandria to an address on Oglethorpe St in NE D.C.). So they're providing the worst possible fare, whereas they should probably provide the median.

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There is no universe in which $42-$69 is remotely possible, unless there's something along the order of $20 surcharge for airport dropoff.

I do this bimonthly, and it's ~$25, with tip.

I hate to think of the nefarious reasons for overquoting taxis like this...

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