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^ Seconding this. I'm a happy user at OneSignal. Great service and the developer experience is top notch. I've been chatting up OneSignal staff to get technical assistance on their Discord chat and via email. As a business, having a reliable technical developer support team who responds quickly is important to me.


Ok, anyone want to help me throw together a better landing page with nice designs, and the same input fields?


Tech people: Rant about egregious things that China and Russia does (political, freedom, basic human rights, etc.)

Also tech people: Vehemently oppose helping the US DoD with their highly-sought after skills, sign online petitions, protest and/or quit their high-paying jobs at <insert tech company that provides value to US DoD>.

Serious question for these tech people: What are you exactly doing to help solve the issues you've ranted about?

I'd like to hear thoughtful responses that are not the typical fallacies (e.g. ad hominem, ad populum, straw man, etc.)


How is the DoD going to help with China and Russia? We're not going to invade them.

If you're referring to the NSA or CIA they're both organizations that ignore the US constitution so there's great reasons to not work for them.


> We're not going to invade them.

So, that is your opinion. The whole point of having a credible option to use violence, is that one is willing to use it. Otherwise, there is no credibility in the threat, which defeats the entire purpose of peace and security that is backed by the potential use of violence. In that sense, if one misses a court ordered appearance, one shouldn't be surprised to see law enforcement knocking on one's doorstep with the threat of violence for legal non-compliance.

Do black hat cyber attacks constitute an "invasion"? If you say no, then that's what Russia / China is banking on, because they're doing it, and betting that the US won't resort to conventional military use of force in retaliation. Since there's no real threat of painful retaliation, they can continue hacking away with no consequence then?

If you say yes, then you're saying that the US should respond to cyber attacks with conventional military use of force, tanks, planes, boots on ground, etc. because you see cyber attacks as no different than a conventional attack by those countries.

Regardless, the US needs more cyber security professionals and other technical professionals (e.g. machine learning etc.) to help with the defense against these actors, but that's hard to do with all this backlash from techies.


Doesnt excuse it either way but do you believe the USA and its intelligence agencies doesnt conduct similar black hat cyber actions in China / Russia? That status quo is simply what modern espionage looks like and doesnt constitute hard military action until it crosses lines it has yet to (shutting down a power grid, for ex).

To build on my other response, perhaps intead of being a China warhawk, which could be the most devastating and destructive war in history if escalated to nuclear war, how about instead we revist things like permenant normalized trade relations with china? How about we invest in local high tech skilled and automation assisted manufacturing such as can be found in south korea? there are many other options besides hard military force and to rush to that is immature and dangerous.


So in my original question, I was inquiring what people were actually doing to positively impact the world in the direction they want it to go (preferably, objectively measurable results), because I know everyone here has opinions about what someone else should do.


So what are you suggesting then? that tech workers leave "high paying jobs" to work for the DoD? To what end? Exert military force against China? I'm not sure thats the right course of action, even though the 21st century almost certainly will see escalating conflict between USA and China.

Rather than the DoD, i could see what you mean if instead we were talking about other federal and local departments of trade, labor, environmental policies, etc. Exerting soft power instead of hard, military force. NGOs with a focus of international labor organizing might be applicable too.


> So what are you suggesting then? that tech workers leave "high paying jobs" to work for the DoD

No. Have you not heard about the tech workers who voluntarily quit their civilian day jobs in protest of their employer, because their employer was working (or planning to work) with the DoD?


I personally have turned down offers such as this with regards to the NYPD so I am familiar. I didnt understand your original point, thought you were saying people should quit high paying tech jobs TO go work for the DoD. Sorry for the confusion.


I think it's a vocal minority that promotes those ideas and the rest follow because it's career suicide to go against it. I'm quite patriotic but not quite brave enough to go against the grain at this time.


To be more accurate, this problem isn't gender specific. The problem is real and impacts everyone.


> The sad thing about the 4 things you listed is that the person in question is rarely conscious of employing those "anti-patterns"

This is like with talk therapy. You can't help someone who doesn't want to be helped, whether they're unaware of their problems, or are aware but are in denial.

This list is more for people who do want to help themselves.


I think this is key to mastering asynchronous communication in a multiplayer setting, which is key to remote


A very common misconception is that the US Army goes to war because it wants to. That is simply not how it works. The US military, unlike most other countries, are 100% under civilian control. This is a safeguard the Founding Fathers put in place to prevent a military coup, and a military dictatorship. That civilian control I refer to is of course the politicians elected into office by The People.

War is means to an end, and that end is a political one.

If you can diplomat your way to your political goal without the need for violence, then that is awesome and should always be the first option over bloodshed.

When the US Army fought the Nazis and imperial Japan, were they “promoting violence against civilians to further their causes”?


> When the US Army fought the Nazis and imperial Japan, were they “promoting violence against civilians to further their causes”?

I don't think you can say the US Army is promoting any violence against civilians, but it is harming civilians, even though it's not promoting that.

Copy-pasting from a previous comment (made by me):

> Here is a list of engagements: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_United_States_mili...

> Taking "2017 Shayrat missile strike" as a random example (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2017_Shayrat_missile_strike) shows that specific mission had at least 9 civilian casualties.

> So even if not intended, the US army are in fact using violence against civilians (like probably most armies in the world)


TruePill (YC S17) | Software Engineer (Full-Stack Web / Front-End / Back-End ) | Full-Time | ONSITE | SF Bay Area

Hi! I'm one of the engineers on the team :)

TruePill is an API like Stripe, but for pharmacy.

https://imgur.com/a/yeGpu4Z (screenshots of our new web site b/c current one is not an accurate representation)

If you're interested in:

- Being an active participant in the decision-making process of a YC company rapidly capitalizing on an under-the-radar market opportunity

- Applying your technical skills to a meaningful domain outside of tech (while learning about industry insider nuances), that has real-world medical implications

- Being part of a small engineering team that not only measures daily active users but also physical products shipped, revenues, and real profits

- Being part of a small engineering team that ships not only software products but also physical products

- Watching how changes in your code physically impacts the operation of not just machines but the IRL work-flow of real people (specifically, pharmacists and technicians)

- Hands-on shipping of product and taking ownership, end-to-end! Everything from ideation --> coding --> customer delight (& wash-rinse-repeat)

then I'd love to hear from you!

Our stack: React, Node, GraphQL (+ Apollo), ES6, Raspberry Pi, AWS (RDS, ECS, CloudFront, EC2), Elasticsearch, Jenkins, Rails, Python, Linux (Ubuntu), Docker, and moar.

We have deliberately avoided press coverage around our traction, investors, and market because we have been focused on taking over the market as quickly as possible, but we will doing a formal and proper launch with more details soon!

We're in the pharmacy (not pharmaceutical) space and I'm happy to elaborate more in private for serious inquiries.

jay liew at jay liew dot com


- The lower-level the category the more customers want support on it.

- The more you can commoditize the layers below you, the more the market likes it. Red Hat does this for servers.

- The lower-level the category the more the market actually “wants” it standardized in order to minimize entropy. This is why low-level infrastructure categories become natural monopolies or oligopolies.

source: https://kellblog.com/2014/11/18/it-aint-easy-making-money-in...


A fast-growing YC company! (S17) | Software Engineer (Full-Stack Web / Front-End / Back-End ) | Full-Time | ONSITE | SF Bay Area

Hi! I'm one of the engineers on the team :)

If you're interested in:

- Being an active participant in the decision-making process of a YC company rapidly capitalizing on an under-the-radar market opportunity

- Applying your technical skills to a meaningful domain outside of tech (while learning about industry insider nuances), that has real-world medical implications

- Being part of a small engineering team that not only measures daily active users but also physical products shipped, revenues, and real profits

- Being part of a small engineering team that ships not only software products but also physical products

- Watching how changes in your code physically impacts the operation of not just machines but the IRL work-flow of real people (specifically, pharmacists and technicians)

- Hands-on shipping of product, end-to-end! Everything from ideation --> coding --> customer delight (& wash-rinse-repeat)

then I'd love to hear from you!

Our stack: React, Node, GraphQL (+ Apollo), ES6, Raspberry Pi, AWS (RDS, ECS, CloudFront, EC2), Elasticsearch, Jenkins, Rails, Python, Linux (Ubuntu), Docker, and moar. Right tool for the job > dogma.

We have deliberately avoided press coverage around our traction, investors, and market because we have been focused on taking over the market as quickly as possible, but we will going public with what we're up to shortly in a few weeks! (I'm sorry there's no web site or company name to google for just yet--but I promise this isn't at all anywhere close to the pejorative "stealth" mode at work)

We're in the pharmacy (not pharmaceutical) space and I'm happy to elaborate more in private for serious inquiries.

We offer competitive Bay Area salary, stock equity, healthcare insurance, and other employee benefits.

jay liew at jay liew dot com


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