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The negotiations and drafts are in fact secret even from Congress at this point, and there's a movement underway to give "fast-track authority" to the president which would also remove the debate from the bill.

"Obama has asked Congress to pass so-called Trade Promotion Authority legislation that would prohibit congressional amendments before an up or down vote on the Trans-Pacific Partnership"

http://www.abqjournal.com/582278/news/nms-dems-oppose-trade-...

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Uptake (uptake.com) - Chicago, IL What we do:

Uptake's business is global, disruptive, differentiated and approaches the market in a new way. We help customers identify hidden value and create growth through business and technology innovation, while also enabling cost efficiencies that generate industry-leading business performance. Our team drives this success by connecting customers and partners to the value of the Internet of Things, business-centric architectures, and key technology transitions.

Uptake's business is global, disruptive, differentiated and approaches the market in a new way. We help customers identify hidden value and create growth through business and technology innovation, while also enabling cost efficiencies that generate industry-leading business performance. Our team drives this success by connecting customers and partners to the value of the Internet of Things, business-centric architectures, and key technology transitions.

Our Tech Stack:

Back-end -- Java, Spring, Elastic Search, RESTful APIs

Front-end -- AngularJS

Data Science -- R

Take a look at our Careers page and don't hesitate to reach out to our Recruiting Team!

uptake.com/join-us/

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This is incredibly cool. I love the way it blurs the line between the physical and the digital. I very much dislike the trend towards touchscreens on everything, I personally like physical controls that have a single purpose, like a volume button.

I could easily order laundry soap on my phone, but this is far quicker and easier, and a genius move by Amazon.

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Ansible seems to have more traction: https://www.google.com/trends/explore#q=ansible%2C%20saltsta...

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Depends on how you view it.

According to the chart Ansible has been around since 2005? Salt is barely 2 years old? Look at the uptick of the last few months and SaltStack seems ever slightly steeper than Ansible.

I am SaltStack guy, albeit a newbie. Barely got done installing (much much easier than Puppet) and trying out few commands. I was hooked on SaltStack when I was able to run following command once and get result from multiple machines near simultaneously.

> salt "*" cmd.run "df -h'

I get result from all machines near simultaneously.

Above command is same as you logging into each machine (say hundreds or thousands) and running 'df -h' to see status of your storage space. You could write/test/deploy a shell script and push it out to all those machines. Or set up some monitoring system. Or install SaltStack across your network (very simple to do) and run above command once on your SaltStack server and get immediate feedback.

I tried working with Puppet long time ago. The idea of having 20 minute window for pushing out changes never seemed attractive to me.

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First commit for Ansible in 2012 (https://github.com/ansible/ansible/commits/devel?page=329).

I guess the previous searches are for the scifi tech devices

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And salt will even output the command results for you in JSON. There's massive potential there for using salt for monitoring not just deployment.

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This is a one-time hit. They're now enforcing licensing very strictly where they didn't before and offering "nicer" terms if they buy some Azure instead of paying those costs retroactively. It'll only work once, and will create a lot of bad karma.

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What exactly is your source and/or position of expertise here? Sounds like a lot of speculation and/or FUD. I was interested in this, but couldn't find any sources to back up your statements.

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Can confirm: big enterprise shops all over have had a serious tightening of SQL Server licenses, as well as other product suites, with major incentives for moving workloads to Azure.

However, I don't know if this is a one time deal: it may grease the wheels on a lot of enterprise shops willingness to "Trust the cloud".

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Confirmed here as well. Just had an audit smackdown. Problem is you never know you're in compliance or not due to various usage policies of MSDN licenses etc for internal use and the definition of internal use changes depending on how much they want you to pay.

Also SQL2012 licenses cost us a fair whack due to the logical vs core licensing changes.

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Also confirmed: MS are trying to squeeze us on SQL Server costs. So we're looking to switch away from SQL Server. Thanks for the headache MS.

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I know: http://www.crn.com/news/cloud/300072551/microsofts-enterpris...

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That's because there's no one place to put the snippets. They work in multiple places, and can be embedded within one another. It's very powerful, and very confusing to get started with.

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Just curious, why do you say to forget about rivers? Did you run into problems? It seems like kind of a nice way to bootstrap data into Elasticsearch.

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I kind of like the approach Elasticsearch takes to this, name an instance after a random Marvel superhero. Keeps things interesting.

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This is cute, but devolves into a maintenance nightmare very quickly. It is much easier to look at a sever list and see "db001" than it is to see "spiderman" and remember if that is a DB or not. Extrapolate that out to hundreds of hosts and you kind of get the picture.

In a modern world where the machines might be homogeneous and VMs/containers above define the actual role, the machine might just be "host123" whereas the higher level services have specific names like "db001."

With service cataloging and discovery tools like Consul (disclaimer: I wrote it), there is an easy way to see a mapping of service name back down to the host it is on. So even if you're yelling to an ops person "hey db001 is having problems," the ops person can quickly map db001 down to host 319.

And with slightly more complex (but worth it, imo) naming, you can determine the rack, datacenter, etc. of a server just by the name.

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> This is cute, but devolves into a maintenance nightmare very quickly.

Especially given that the name changes at every startup. It's absolutely not recommended to stick with the auto-assigned names, but a rather good idea to name the node after the machine or the location.

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Would you mind sharing your workaround?

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One of the problems is the connotations tied up in the word "God". Because there's so much history, baggage, and tradition tied up in that word it makes it difficult to do any sort of real experiments based on it, nevermind using that word in any defined sense in the first place.

But that said, I'm with you. It saddens me to see most scientists completely close their mind to an idea. It flies in the face of the idea of experimentation and discovery. Especially bad when you see people dismissing very valid interpretations of experiments simply because the downstream ramifications make them uncomfortable (the Copenhagen interpretation comes to mind).

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