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jasondenizac 222 days ago | link | parent | on: Hacker News Onion

This is so much better than we deserve.

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Somewhat related, the recently launched Bay Area Bike Share system has a not-too-well-publicized API at http://bayareabikeshare.com/stations/json

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The number one reason to write CLI apps in node is npm. npm gets package management right, preferring local dependencies to global ones - this means no worrying about what version of a library a user has in their global environment.

You also get to bring node's parallel io-centric patterns to your scripting. Need to download a bunch of files from a remote host, process them, and write them to disk? Go for it.

But take it with a grain of salt: it's very much a use-what-you-know kind of thing.

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barrkel 251 days ago | link

Need to download a bunch of files from a remote host, process them, and write them to disk?

    cat urls.txt | while read -r url; do 
      base="$(basename "$url")"
      wget "$url" -O - -o "$base.log" | process > "$base" &
    done
    wait
For ad-hoc scripting, I tend to prefer bash, with anything remotely corresponding to heavy lifting assigned to the language with the best library / performance / whatever critical factor for it. Fork-join parallelism in bash is very easy.

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FooBarWidget 252 days ago | link

I thought a lot of people discourage the use of static linking or any form of local dependency bundling, because when there's a security update every app needs to be updated individually. But it seems that with the emergence of Bundler and NPM, people are trending more and more towards local bundling. What happened?

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CamperBob2 252 days ago | link

One possible contrarian view: global dependencies actually cause a lot of those security updates to be necessary. Exploits that target a given version of a given library may be easier to propagate if you know that almost every application run by every user depends on that library version.

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octo_t 252 days ago | link

alternatively: maven managed to get dependency management right about 5 years ago.

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dk8996 252 days ago | link

Hahaha really? Have you seen a pom file on a real project its about 10 pages with plugins galore.

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sehrope 252 days ago | link

The verbosity of the XML pom is the problem. Alternative syntax using the same coordinate system are great and much easier on the eyes. The real value in maven (I think) is having that clean dependency chain and it works great. XML is what sucks (especially doing it by hand).

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cgag 251 days ago | link

Yeah, pom files are disgusting, but leiningen (the clojure build tool) is built on top of maven and it's wonderful.

    [enlive "1.1.1"]
instead of

    <dependency>
      <groupId>enlive</groupId>
      <artifactId>enlive</artifactId>
      <version>1.1.1</version>
    </dependency>

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rnovak 252 days ago | link

really. if a page is about 60-80 lines, that's what, 1000 lines? and most IDE's help manage them. The makefile's to some open source projects get longer than that, and they only get worse when they're proprietary.

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dk8996 251 days ago | link

I didn't know that the bar is makefiles... welcome to 1977.

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Check out https://github.com/mozilla/SocialShare and Persona :)

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"You are insane" sounds like a great compliment to a marketer.

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anigbrowl 260 days ago | link

Which is why you can't trust people who work in marketing. They're professionally dishonest.

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bennyg 260 days ago | link

All people who work in marketing are dishonest. You literally can't trust any of them.

Edit: I guess sarcasm should be mentioned.

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IgorPartola 259 days ago | link

"Hello" he lied.

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Zimahl 260 days ago | link

At a minimum it might make a good defense in federal court.

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I'm pretty sure they mean marketing approval, not regulatory approval. Parse before you preach.

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mbreese 259 days ago | link

I read it the other (regulatory approval) way the first time too...

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The amount of knee-jerking on this thread is why we can't have nice things.

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oijaf888 260 days ago | link

Because there are some of the harshest/confusing laws around alcohol (for anything legally sold) in the United States? Its easier to legally sell a handgun to a friend than sell a bottle of wine.

So we can't have nice things because people want to obey laws that tend to be extremely strictly enforced?

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bowlofpetunias 260 days ago | link

This kind of juvenile behavior is not a "nice thing". At least not in the context of running a business.

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jasondenizac 260 days ago | link

I actually think this promotion was extremely on-brand for what this startup is (or was) doing. I can't speak to the regulatory compliance angle, but the fact is that this was clever, effective, and well-placed customer contact. It's not the risk profile that I would personally look for, but it is a little sad to see so many on HN rushing to condemn it.

We can't have nice things when people who claim to be "disruptive" are actually busy pursuing safe, risk-averse targets.

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ihateloggingin 260 days ago | link

I don't really care about ATF regulations, but there is no moral high ground here. This was just plagiarism. These people pretended to have done something that they did not do. They took credit for someone else's work.

So "we can't have nice things" here means "we can't plagiarize vodka"? Well you can't plagiarize Steven King either. Deal with it.

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bluefinity 259 days ago | link

So, if I buy 1000 pens, and have my company name printed on them, I'm plagiarizing someone else's work? That's nonsense.

Cheap vodka is a commodity, not an art form.

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ihateloggingin 248 days ago | link

It would be if you lied to people and told them that you made the pens.

The example you chose is deliberately one in which it would be assumed that you were not asserting authorship. Frankly, choosing that example shows you're dishonest.

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kevinbracken 260 days ago | link

Indeed. Our market back then was quasi-legal loft parties and house parties, so this was idea was definitely to fit the mood of the "modern speakeasy." Thanks!

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anigbrowl 260 days ago | link

No it isn't. People shafting consumers for a quick buck is why we can't have nice things.

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Does Arq fit the OP's use case of backing up files to AWS without keeping them on your local machine?

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jasondenizac 284 days ago | link | parent | on: Promises/A+

While the Promises/A+ specification is primarily focussed on JavaScript, the concept of promises certainly did not originate in JavaScript. For that matter, there are actually a number of implementations of Promises/A+ in other languages and platforms: https://github.com/promises-aplus/promises-spec/blob/master/...

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jasondenizac 284 days ago | link | parent | on: Promises/A+

Q has `Q.all()` which does the same thing: https://github.com/kriskowal/q/wiki/API-Reference#promiseall

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andywhite37 284 days ago | link

Oh that's cool, thanks for the reply. I haven't looked at Q yet, but I've heard a lot about it. I guess it's time to have a look.

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