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Personally I'm really excited about Composer. So many implications...

- What does this mean for Evernote? - Can Dropbox pull off a new product without prior traction? Mailbox seems to have generally worked out OK, but what's happened to Carousel? - Will messaging inside of Dropbox a valuable angle on collaboration and if so, will anything happen between Dropbox and Slack? - What will this mean for Dropbox's relationship with Microsoft? - Who will Dropbox acquire next? They have files, mail, notes...seems like a modern Exchange.

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Author here. Curious what others have learned from the latest iOS8 apps!

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Not only is Product Hunt important because of the visibility it provides to new products (and entrepreneurs), but also because it's arguably the most dense collection of high quality discussions about product development decisions. Notably, Ryan and his team have managed to accomplish this without being unnecessarily exclusive.

This is tremendously valuable for the technology community.

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I appreciate that, Jason. I hope Product Hunt can help both large VC-backed startups and some kid that built a cool product, get the attention they deserve. It's early but we're seeing examples of this already. It's exciting.

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I hope Product Hunt can help both large VC-backed startups and some kid that built a cool product, get the attention they deserve.

There's a huge opportunity for you to do that, but only if you open up participation. Because submissions and comments are limited to a few users, the kid with a cool product will only get eyes on it if she gets the right person's attention, which defeats the purpose.

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Free shipping on both products puts it at $13.24 on Google [1] and $16.17 on Amazon [2]. But yes, my post could have been much more objective and scientific.

[1] Google https://www.dropbox.com/s/vbnpel7w2mscpv2/google_express_pro... [2] Amazon https://www.dropbox.com/s/gh0rcveo1sqtmgw/amazon_prime_produ...

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Some of these UX moves, to be fair, have been used by an increasing number of mobile and messaging apps. MessageMe is just one example of comprehensive implementation alongside effective design.

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According to Foursquare's co-founder Dennis Crowley, as quoted by TechCrunch, the service saw 5 million checkins per day as of Feb. 2013. But that was the same as per-day checkins as the previous year. Flat growth to me, especially in their space.

The rest, and a fairly critical piece of my statement, about checkins moving to Facebook and Path I admit wholeheartedly was anecdotal and speculative.

http://techcrunch.com/2013/04/11/foursquares-new-series-d-ro...

http://techcrunch.com/2013/03/16/interview-dennis-crowley-of...

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Admittedly I don't check in often. I use Path / Facebook for this now.

Trey Titone suggested in the comments on the post that if Foursquare could do frictionless sharing with the app running in the background, maybe they could get more checkin data. But I think the battery constraints / privacy concerns are too high, at least in the next 18-24 months, for people to opt in for this without getting much product value.

Battery life will get better, apps will be more battery-efficient, and privacy concerns tend to fade away. But frictionless checkins don't seem highly compelling to me from the user point-of-view for people to make the necessary sacrifices that adoption would demand.

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I'm curious what others think about this. I'm a fan of Foursquare and their team and hope I am wrong about this. I'm also confident they will still have a large exit.

That being said, without a product hook that's very engaging, I think it's hard to build a local ads business, which is what I think Foursquare sees as its revenue stream. Do people see Foursquare differently, as say, an ecommerce company? Do they even need a growing product hook to build a good local ads business?

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I agree completely with your post. I've never been compelled to use Foursquare, but have observed friends who were into the original check-in idea gradually pull away because of the force-feeding.

B2C is hard to monetize, period. The Groupon collapse sort of shut one possible revenue door for Foursquare. Twitter can pull off ads because it has a big brand draw that Foursquare just doesn't.

I respect the team, but I don't envy their position.

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Having a large exit, and building a vastly profitable business are 2 different things. The former relies on the existence of the greater fool, while the latter actually depends on nailing the business fundamentals. Sadly.. I'm confident there will be a greater fool here too :)

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Now if foursquare can improve on Yelp's model and address its faults then maybe?

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I'm curious about their hand-holding UX approach. It worked for me. But I don't know if it's something that helps most users, or just gets in the way. Would be great to be able to A/B test something like this on mobile.

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i think the ux handholding approach is great.

HNers are different from most consumers, so even if it seems annoying to some of us, it probably wins by reducing ambiguity for a much larger set of users.

Obviously, it shouldn't happen EVERY time you use the app, but as an intro for new users, it seems awesome.

Are there tools like mixpanel that you could use to track engagement and usage patterns of cohorts afterwards on mobile?

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There are definitely a lot of negative reactions to the queue.

However, it's more the new user experience once you actually have access that's building love. Naturally, waiting doesn't build love. Maybe some excitement, but also some animosity as we saw in this case. But if you can drive the excitement as they did for some people, but most importantly capitalize on the hype when people are actually using the app for the first time...that's when you build love IMO.

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