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Indeed! I haven't seen a "normal" drinking fountain in Portland in ages.

That said, I have seen homeless people do unspeakable things with them, so my trust is rattled.

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The constant flowing water and exposure to the elements provides a lot of mechanical action to wash away bacteria. I've also never actually seen anything gross stuck onto the water spout, so I'm not too worried about it.

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There's chloramines in the water to deal with things like that anyway. Nobody is scrubbing out the water mains beneath the streets - they're not 'clean' by any common definition of the word, but they are perfectly acceptable - they're sanitary due to the disinfection compounds in the water.

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"hobo bidets" we call them

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I often see crows drinking out of them, which I find endearing, but others might look askance at.

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I'd be worried if the crows refused to drink from them.

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I've seen them used as birdbaths, and people let their dogs drink from them. It doesn't make me terribly excited about drinking from them myself.

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I wasn't a huge fan of seeing them in the SERPs back in the day; hopefully Google has an opt-out.

I wouldn't mind if somehow it was integrated into Google News; that could be cool.

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I feel the complete opposite - I used to Google for specific tweets I remembered seeing and to help find tweets relating to current events. Google was much better about showing me the stuff I wanted to see than the actual Twitter site!

I'm really excited to have this back.

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.. which is exactly why an opt-out would be a good solution. People can see what they want, and rbing in tweets when/if appropriate.

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Worst case, I bet someone will make a chrome plugin to purge twitter results from search.

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The signal (actual news) to noise (opinions, comments, satire) is very high so adding Twitter to news is probably not a good idea.

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I think you mean "very low"

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Yup. I meant "extremely low"

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Wonder what is more valuable: showing tweets along the search results or being able to use them to rank other search results?

Especially for stuff that is happening right now, tweets probably contain pretty good information on what are the most relevant sources of information. And since the text part is show short, it is easier to match what this tweet is related to.

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Its going to be heavily censored anyway, Twitter has an excessive amount of trolls, harassment and negative tweets in regards to any major social news event. There is no way Google will let that hit the search results.

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>I wouldn't mind if somehow it was integrated into Google News; that could be cool.

I've wanted to build a site that mixes news feeds with tweets about said news. Some news sites have weak twitter streams to the side but it would be cool to have something more immersive.

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You might find reddit live interesting, it does a pretty good job of this imo. For example, https://www.reddit.com/live/u9z0oa5c4jud/ and http://www.reddit.com/live/u7qtz12ybb74

Together with being crowd sourced it's a really fresh take on breaking news.

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Does -site:twitter.com count as an "opt-out"?

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This helped me visualize how close LEO satellites are, as well as how far away others are (e.g. GPS).

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/82/Orbitalal...

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Cool! Quick back-of-the-napkin indicates that the RTT for LEO satellites (at the upper bound) would be only ~4.7% of the RTT for GEO satellites. I'm sure there's much more to the story that I'm missing, but an LEO satellite should have a latency of around 11.75ms. In 2012, average US latency to Google was ~50-60ms [1]. Would bandwidth be the limiting factor?

[1] https://www.igvita.com/2012/07/19/latency-the-new-web-perfor...

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[deleted]

You're misreading the chart, take another look. The moon is 10x further.

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Not quite, according to that graphic the moon is nearly 10x further away than the GEO distance

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I think he means you should at least read the code on the other end of that URL to make sure it matches what's on the site.

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That's just it: It does. Line for line, character for character (even space for space, which is important in Python). I wouldn't say what I did above without having diffed the file against the code displayed first.

I just don't get the mentality here sometimes; someone creates a helpful script, puts the source code on their site for you to read and study, and the first instinct is to assume they have malicious intent before even taking a few minutes to read over it first. Hell, I'm no programmer but I know enough about the basics to follow exactly what the code does. It took me all of five minutes to decide that it flips two switches and nothing more. That the programming gods here can't or won't do that is telling.

I get being paranoid about random scripts, but this one is on display for all to see before running. There is literally nothing hidden, yet you all act as if the author is trying to secretly take over your machines. It would be funny if it wasn't so pathetic.

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Plus you should read what's downloaded to your machine before executing it, since there's also no guarantee that what's been served to your browser will be served to your curl.

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Agreed. It doesn't take a lot of working with PayPal to know the IPN system is fragile at best.

PaymentDetails is mandatory for any adaptive payments integration.

https://developer.paypal.com/docs/classic/api/adaptive-payme...

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[deleted]

> utterly bullet proof

It is an https request. The internet is not bulletproof. What if your SSL cert expires, or due to being on the front page your webhook is timing out? Do you expect paypal to keep trying that IPN indefinitely? I hate paypal and all my new stuff uses stripe but any system that relies upon a request being made to notify of a transaction is not going to be bulletproof due to the nature of the internet.

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Do you expect paypal to keep trying that IPN indefinitely?

They retry up to 15 times or 4 days[1].

[1] https://developer.paypal.com/webapps/developer/docs/classic/...

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I work with SendGrid frequently because of my day job, and they have hands down the worst software and design of any company in the industry.

I use Mandrill for my private projects, and it is so much better it's shocking SendGrid has a single customer.

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To me the bigger news here is that this bug has been in the wild for at least 5 years.

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It hasn't. The 'gotofail' bug doesn't exist in 10.8.5 or earlier.

The 'news' here is that Safari6 & 7 received updates but Safari5 didn't. Piggy-backing 'gotofail' is just alarmism.

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I try and be very helpful to customers I'm losing... they might come back one day or recommend someone to me.

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I don't think many people used Opera because of it's rendering engine; they used it because of the GUI and high-level features.

Moving to webkit just let them focus on what actually made them unique to their customers.

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The Myopera forums are rife with users complaining about missing features in the Opera 15+. Any unique features which distinguished Opera have been axed and most solutions seem to point towards using browser addons to accomplish what was previously in-built. They might have gained a few users, but it appears the majority of the current userbase will be sticking with Opera 12 for the time being.

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Yes, but from what I understand their plan is to bring back most of the features in the future (I remember them mentioning specifically bookmarks, opera link and tab thumbnails), until then: Opera 12.

On the other side Chrome based Opera is also starting to look pretty good in it's own rights: it's fast and snappy, mouse gestures are there if I'm not mistaken, page stack (or whatever the name is) is cool. If I would to choose between Chrome and Opera 16 now I would go with the latter (also because Chrome really pushes too much Google on the user).

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I heard that they ditched the fit-to-width feature (ctrl-F11), do you know if this is true?

It's one of those features other browsers simply do not have (Opera has a couple more but this one's pretty unique) that I really do use several times a day, and I'm not "upgrading" until I know they won't take that away.

Not that it matters too much, features or not, I'm thinking to switch to Firefox because these are times no longer to be using closed-source software.

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Fit-to-width did all kinds of magic at a layout engine level — it's not that simple to just reimplement on top of a new engine. And then there's the question as to whether Google would let an implementation would ever get upstreamed to Blink.

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Why would Google not want such a cool feature?

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It'd be a deep, pervasive runtime option across a lot of code.

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I think you're generally correct about users not caring about the rendering engine for the most part. I wouldn't care at all that they ditched Presto if it meant they retained all the previous features and user interface they had before transitioning. However, I am worried that is unlikely to happen.

Looking at the course Blink based Opera has taken thus far, it doesn't look like they're focusing on keeping current users happy (any new user base is going to be an uphill climb). It's still new, but as a consistent Opera user for almost a decade, I'm very skeptical of them keeping all the previous customization as well as avoiding "Chromisms" in the UI.

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I still use Opera 12 because of the lack of features in the new version. My biggest pet peevs: Ctrl+Tab behavior (Opera default was 'previous tab' now it's 'next tab') and no thumbnails tabs on the left, and they removed the email client.

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While it's lacking the menu, there is at least opera://flags/#activation-order-tab-cycling now.

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Yeah, I dislike both of those changes as well. I have a pretty long list of things Opera needs to add to versions beyond 12 before I will update to their Blink version. Until then, I'm still using 12 as well.

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I'm also sticking to Opera 12, missing quite a lot of features in the Blink version...

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http://operabrowser.wikispaces.com/Features

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> and they removed the email client.

And the IRC client and BitTorrent client?

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I agree the rendering engine isn't important, but when they threw out Presto they also threw out most of the features and innovations they created and turned Opera into a sort of half-assed Chrome.

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Porting features usually mean to redesign them to match the new codebase/paradigm. It's not as simple as copy/pasting code...

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Nobody said it was simple. The problem is that they shouldn't have tossed out the old code if they weren't going to be able to replace it.

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So you are suggesting them to maintain two different codebases during the transition rather than focus all their efforts to the new version to make the transition as short as possible?

IMHO they did the correct choice, every new version Opera will difference itself more and more of Chromium. You can continue to use Opera 12.16 until they take the decision to pull the trigger to completely kill 12.16 auto-updating it...

Remember the transition from Firefox 3.6 to the current Firefox, they didn't kill 3.6 until they reached version 12.

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There was literally nothing to stop them delaying the release by 1 - 2 months and delivering more than a bare-bones Chrome.

Opera sets their own schedule beholden to nobody.

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They didn't just switch to webkit, they killed the product and made a chromium fork, and called it "Opera."

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I used to use Opera because of it's privacy features. Being able to have different configuration of javascript, cookies, referals, content blocking and so on. Now with Opera 16 all these features are gone.

How do you increase you're competitive abilities by removing everything that made you unique when you're already the underdog? :S

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You forget to mention that they are "per site" preferences.

But wtf they removed this too?? What is wrong with those people?

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Per-site preferences will be returning to Opera in a future version, so don't lose hope.

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I'm not going to say that your fingerprints won't fall into the wrong hands, but it's incredibly simple to monitor network traffic from the device, and it's a guarantee someone will do this just to see.

It's also a guarantee that Apple knows this, so why bother lying?

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