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I, and many other people regardless of graphics card, CPU, or RAM, are experiencing an issue where the game slows to a stuttering crawl after a while. Adding RAM extends the playable time period, but only staves off the inevitable. There are many lengthy threads on the topic, with people suggesting things like putting the pagefile on an SSD to ameliorate the bottleneck, or using third-party programs to aggressively clear caches. For every homegrown solution, there are people who claim it doesn't work for them. Google "gta v pc stuttering" for an overview.

Seriously considering asking for a refund myself.


Anyone who was going to get hooked on Game of Thrones is hooked, and anyone who is still on the fence isn't likely to torrent the leaked episodes. Incompetence is a better explanation, I think.

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Do you not realize how complex the workflow pipelines are for a film or TV series of any kind? And how shows involving a lot of special effects like GoT are orders of magnitude more complex? For the publicity and marketing side of things we like to send actors out on talk shows to talk about character and costumes and drama and so on, and maybe show a few shots of a giant camera on a greenscreen stage to talk about how innovative things are, but there's a vast amount of painstaking digital troubleshooting and assembly work by hundreds of people involved in the manufacture of the product. I think you underestimate the degree of engineering knowledge that obtains in the entertainment industry, and at how many different levels that engineering knowledge is applied.

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I am hooked on GoT, my response to HBO is thus:

"Dear HBO, as a subscriber to HBO since 1983, I am saddened for this leak. As a huge fan of GoT, I am delighted, thank you, I will still watch all episodes in HD and DVR them every Sunday."

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HBO should allow for HBO GO users to see the whole season at a time - the same way netflix does.

There is no reason to meter out the story. Netflix dumping a whole season on the wire when it gets released is the best release method ever.

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Sorry, but I couldn't disagree more. Ever since Game of Thrones started, I have gathered with various groups of friends nearly every Sunday to watch the episode as it airs. Watching Game of Thrones has become a social event primarily because the release structure forces everyone to always be at the same point (even if some have read the books).

In contrast, after House of Cards s3 was released and we watched a few episodes together, it became a free for all. Having a conversation about the show with anyone is practically impossible unless everyone has seen the entire show.

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Linear TV is over though. You can easily setup watch clubs or movies without having some exec throw your series around and invade your schedule and stretch it across a season.

Entertainment, in such a busy world, should be available at the leisure of the viewer, not some game rigged to keep interest over a time. Personally I'd rather watch the whole GoT season now to avoid seeing spoilers.

I think because of binging, better quality content is being created that is more complete and movie like. This content is meant to be consumed as a whole complete series and written as such, rather than hacked together a few weeks out and more plot holes or unnecessary episodes. Shows are so much better consumed in whole rather than across many many weeks, it leads to a stronger buy into the characters and the writing.

With binging, full availability, people can also easily catch up this way and watch older series more readily together. What we are moving to is a much better system than linear broadcast television which was only that way because there was limited network and resource availability, also it was all about the ads. I am sure there will be more watchers groups setup to binge together because so much more TV is available this way.

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> Entertainment, in such a busy world, should be available at the leisure of the viewer, not some game rigged to keep interest over a time.

Well, it can't be. It has to be made first. No matter what, there will always be some kind of a delay in when you can watch the next X of Y, simply because we haven't invented time travel yet.

And I absolutely agree that the broadcast model -- where you see the thing only if you're at your TV at the right time -- is a thing of the past, but there's no reason that means serialization (which is what I think you mean by linear) should go away.

> I think because of binging, better quality content is being created that is more complete and movie like.

I won't argue, by any stretch, that scripted serialized storytelling (non-film) hasn't gotten markedly better over the last few years, but this kicked off long before Netflix dumped an entire season of HoC into your lap and can largely be credited to the shows that really raised the bar, like The Wire, The Sopranos, Mad Men, Breaking Bad, etc. All of those were serialized. Netflix is a johnny come lately to this trend.

And there is actually value in having time to digest what you just watched. You're more likely to think critically about it and less likely to just swallow it as some giant mass of stuff. The social aspect of being in sync with other people -- even people you just met -- can mean finding new ways to think about the story that you didn't have before.

All the netflix model does is make it so our episodes of TV are impossibly long, and their impact on popular culture much much less. People absolutely talk more about shows they're actively watching during a season.

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http://www.npr.org/2015/03/17/393596736/forget-binge-watchin...

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+1 for enjoying scheduled programming.

I don't believe this model will ever go away because of things like live sports. You can't "on demand" a live basketball game and part of the joy is enjoying the results unfold together.

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This is something I had not ever thought of, so thank you for that.

As a father of three small kids, I don't have the luxury of a weekly viewing parties. I find solace in the times when I have several hours to binge watch at my own pace.

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This thread is just some incredibly nice and cordial and thoughtful discussion, thank you everyone.

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I personally prefer the Netflix format of all at once (especially with how little each plot line moves forward each episode) but I can understand a metered approach. You can generate much more hype and social media buzz if you trickle it out over time.

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By distributing it gradually, the get more subscribers. I know plenty of people who pay HBO only during the time of the year that GoT is broadcast. That's about 3-4 months.

I recall the the last episode was postponed one week last year due to some strike or something alike, forcing people to pay an additional month of HBO. I heard a few complaining about this extra cost (and the fact that there was no episode that weekend!).

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I think that statement is really rather silly. It's a bit like saying "anyone who is going to drink coke is already drinking coke". There's a ring of truth to it, but it still falls flat.

Edit: a few things: arguments based on the behavior of "the majority" and arguments founded on the principle that 100% of all people who have ever been Game of Thrones viewers are completely and utterly committed to viewing every single season are rather weak. Viewership of shows changes from season to season. More so, not every TV show viewer is the sort of person who must start a series from the beginning. Pulling in folks who are caught up on Game of Thrones but haven't been hooked on the current season and pulling in folks who will begin mid stream (and then maybe go back and watch from the beginning, or not) adds to their viewership. More viewers means more purchases, more purchases means more dollars.

Not to mention the value of retaining their existing viewership base.

These are all the same reasons why coke continues to dump massive amounts of dollars into advertising despite already being well known and having a huge chunk of the soft drink marketshare. In fact, the returns on investment for advertising already popular products tends to be higher than for products just entering the market, because the numbers are so big. There are millions of Game of Thrones fans. If even a few hundred thousand existing fans who might have held off on watching the new season are kept on the hook and if even a few hundred thousand non-watchers gain interest in the show via starting with the new season and if only a small fraction of those folks end up purchasing the discs, or HBO (in whatever form) then that's a considerable amount of money in HBO's pocket that would have been left on the table.

Which isn't saying it wasn't an accident, but business wise this is still a win for HBO.

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I don't watch game of thrones. If I was going to start watching it, I would start at the beginning of the series instead of just jumping straight into the leaked episodes. By the time I get to the latest season, they would be formally released.

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If you were going to start, it might be because the folks at the water cooler were excited about it - and this leak makes that more likely. People who'd dropped off might be reminded there's a new season coming and feel inspired to catch up. It's a great way to build hype for the "real" start of the new series.

I think accident is more likely, but HBO doesn't lose much - anyone who watches these episodes is going to want to watch the rest of the series and is going to pay HBO (or else would never have done so)

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Yeah I'm with you, tho only people who seemed interested in the leaked episodes were big fans.

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Except for the fact that this is a TV show, and the majority of people who want to begin watching it will want to start at the beginning with season 1.

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I worry more about torrent piracy in Australia — with impending Dallas Buyers Club lawsuits, I'm recommending everybody I know find it through alternate means or investigate VPNs. No matter how it was leaked, no doubt they're monitoring the swarm like hawks.

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Only discovered GoT a year ago, and caught up by binge-watching all the episodes in less than 2 weeks.

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"Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity."

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The English proverb would be "who pays the piper picks the tune."

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There is also the debased version of the golden rule. The golden rule being, of course, "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you."

The debased version being, "Who has the gold, makes the rules." (http://quoteinvestigator.com/2015/01/11/has-gold/)

Sometimes in gloomier moments, I am reminded of the gap between the two.

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Very apt. Thanks.

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The Z thing is killer. It puts you in company with http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horsez, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bratz, and numberless rappers, none of which make a professional impression.

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While the name is not perfect, I don't believe it is as dramatic as you are making it out to be

http://www.fogcreek.com/fogbugz

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If you're Joel Spolsky you can release a piece of software with any name you care to choose and people will still take it seriously because you have earned the respect of your peers. Other people who don't have decades of experience producing exceptional software don't have the same luxury.

Fogbugz is a terrible name and if an unknown developer had released it there's a good chance too few people would have looked at it for it to get the necessary traction it needed to succeed. It really isn't an example of something people should follow.

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Also, people who can't pronounce voiced consonants at the end of syllables (such as german, dutch, french people) can't help but hear it as FuckBugs.

"Ve still neet a buck trecker, I vas finking about Jira, or do you haef a better idea?" "Yes, I recommend FuckBugs!"

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To be fair though, FuckBugs would be a brilliant name for a bug tracker.

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Let's build it.

In BrainFuck.

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FogBugz was released in Nov 2000. How big was Joel Spolsky then? (It's before my time.) It looks like Joel was hardly blogging when FogBugz was released ( http://joelonsoftware.com/backIssues.html )

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To be fair, as early as 2004 he had this to say on the name:

"Yeah, it's not an ideal name... But the brand equity is already worth significantly more than the cost of having a yucky name... (There was a period for about 6 months when "Z" was all the rage. Antz, Dogz, and Atomz come to mind)."

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Names don't matter if you have a good product, unless you create brand confusion (Windows Live Messenger, anyone?). I thought "Google" was the stupidest name, and I still don't find it attractive.

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Completely agreed. I've been able to work quite effectively on a T520i -- but I've also experienced occasional frustration with the hardware integration. Every time I upgrade Ubuntu, I worry that I'm about to knock my system's stability off its precarious perch, and sometimes it happens. Things just aren't bulletproof.

For my next computer, I'm willing to spend the extra $1000 for a Mac, where I can believe that things really will Just Work™.

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You can buy a system76, thinkpenguin, Dell XPS 13, or Zareason computer and expect Ubuntu to just work™. Stop buying Windows computers and saying its the Linux distros fault the hardware isn't fully supported or stable, it is the same thing as trying to install OSX on a Windows computer and complaining nothing works. You gotta get supported products, and they do exist now, they are just a small and growing market. But it will only grow if people actually buy barebones / Ubuntu machines to send the message people are willing to buy them and not just add to the sales figures of Windows laptop nine million.

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http://www.reddit.com/r/linux/comments/1pwwr0/system76_is_sc...

When I last checked the reviews of the system76 laptops, there were more problems than the T420. The Zareason systems have those awful keyboards from the looks of it, and even the "UltraLap" looks bulky. And it includes a terrible resolution screen. (Why is anything shipping with 1366x768 anymore?)

They either aren't thinking of programmers, or they don't have the money to compete.

I'm considering the XPS 13, but the screen is too small. I want a thin 14 or 15 inch laptop. (The T420 doesn't quite make it in that regard, but it's old technology at this point.) And, of course, the XPS 15 doesn't have a ubuntu edition.

I'm willing to make a sacrifice for weight if the keyboard and monitor are top notch (like the T420) but nobody is taking keyboards seriously anymore. And as far as I can tell, the best keyboard and screen today is Apple.

I've spent the last 3 years with my personal laptop running Linux. I'll probably stick with this until I can't anymore. But I'm not willing to sacrifice my productivity "to make a point."

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I have the Clevo 740SU from Xotic, due to the negative press around System76 from early last year. You can get it without an OS and the only requirement is replacing the wifi card if you want a good wireless nic.

Its 14", thin, powerful, etc - only downside is battery life, which only gets 3 - 6 hours depending on workload.

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Why not try another distro? I have been using Fedora since version 17 on my T530 and using fedup to upgrade without issues. Now I'm on Fedora 21 and it works perfectly fine.

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I downloaded the application, and it prompted a restart to install a driver, but did nothing further. duet.app does nothing when I open it, and plugging in my iPad does nothing either. Looks like we have to wait for the App Store release to install the iPad half of the app.

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After installing, there is an icon in my menubar that says I should open duet on my iOS [1]. I believe we wait for the iOS app tomorrow and see what's the price and how this thing works

1: http://i.imgur.com/1fEHPLF.png

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"In general, our advice is to develop a responsive site that can adapt to the capabilities of different devices. If you choose to build a mobile-specific experience then we recommend looking for the sub-string "mobile" in the user agent string to determine when to deliver mobile optimised content:"

    function isMobile() {
        return navigator.userAgent.toLowerCase().indexOf("mobile")>=0;
    }
This is really the best we can do after twenty years of the WWW?

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Browser identification is an arms race. It harkens back to the original user agent wars near the turn of the millenium. I think it's unlikely to ever have a solid way to identify browsers. If one is developed, it will be used by (bad?) developers as an exclusion check for their fancy content. That gives other browsers an incentive to lie. I think the whole concept is inherently unstable for this reason.

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No. Feature detection (which is also mentioned in the article) is far superior

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or do user-agent detection server-side against database of (mostly) known user-agents and take JS out of the UA detection picture entirely.

In JVM land I've had pretty good success with UADetector [1] for delivering device specific content to mobile phones and desktop/laptop/tablets.

[1] https://github.com/before/uadetector

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ug, that's already a bad check, but if they insist, why not just:

    /mobile/i.test(navigator.userAgent)

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> Some people, when confronted with a problem, think "I know, I'll use regular expressions." Now they have two problems.

Just because the API call and syntax is a bit iffy doesn't mean it's a bad pattern. ES6 will finally have a string .contains method btw (https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Refe...)

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I'd add \b around to avoid matching e.g. `Immobile/1.0`, the slow browser.

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It is certainly possible, but it hardly seems advisable. The worst-case scenario is exceedingly bad.

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I would even argue that the most likely scenario would be you being prosecuted as a willing participant and beneficiary in the fraud and going to PIA prison in US.

Even in those case where people were innocent(did not keep the merchandise), they still had to go to court.

The other scenario (being hurt by the scammer) is less likely but equally unappealing.

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The author does mention that you could just shut down your engines and wait to spot your prey; but once you put yourself on an intercept (by firing your engines), the opponent will know where you are.

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If Netflix closed its doors today, presumably Amazon Prime and Hulu would pick up the slack. The problem is not Netflix providing content; the problem is users consuming it. Users want better service than the ISPs are inclined to provide.

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