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"The Knowledge", by Lewis Dartnell, is a book which purports to tell you how to re-bootstrap civilization.

http://the-knowledge.org/en-gb/

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How is that not actually the same family?

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I don't think anyone was arguing that adopted children are any less meaningful than biological children, but if a 60 year old business owner adopts a 40 year old manager who works at his company that's really not the same thing.

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Exactly. This isn't some love relationship, it's about keeping the family name in the company. The manager loses his family name but gets the perk of inheriting a company out of it.

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It depends if it includes breastfeeding and snugging or not.

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It is the same family, though it would be more amazing if they adopted and raised younger kids kids without consideration for whether they would inherit the business or not, and still manage to keep the business in the family for 1300 years.

But the act of passing the business down to non-blood related adults for 1300 years without going belly up is amazing.

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AS a father of three adopted children I ask the same. Adoption is family even if they look different then your own skin they are family.

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Nobody's disputing that, but the Japanese custom for adult adoption is something else entirely: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_adult_adoption

So if you adopt a child and raise it as your own and that child takes over your business, is it still a "family business? Yes.

But can you say it's still a "family" business if it's gone through the Japanese custom of adult adoption? Arguably yes, because that person was brought into their family as a legitimate heir.

On the other hand you could argue that it's no different than a family business being sold in the western sense, it's just that in ancient Japan you couldn't really buy and sell businesses, they were owned by clans, so this was their mechanism for ensuring business continuity when there was no suitable male heir.

I'm not taking a stance on whether it's still a "real" family business, but it's important to understand that what the Japanese mean by "adoption" in this sense is not at all what westerners mean when they use that word.

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Another reminder that Japan extended their feudal period longer than most.

Then again, the west took on the practice of putting the founders name on a corporations...

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My adopted Children when Adopted (10, 20, 22) They were in my house at 7, 11, 15 from the same mother. LONG story but I ended up adopted the two older ones when they were ready which wasn't till they were adults.

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Nobody is arguing that adoption per se isn't the same as "the same family". The practice being described here is that the adoption is specifically adopting someone _because_ they're going to be the next owner of the business. I'm sure you can see that there's a salient difference between your case of adopting to build a family vs the case here of a 65 year old guy adopting his 50-year old successor as part of a tradition of that business.

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I keep my free Dropbox account, but I won't pay them any money while they have Rice on board. (I was a paid member of Loom, which they acquired. As a result of the acquisition I was to become a paid member of Dropbox's photo syncing service. Instead I demanded and got my money back.)

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NYC: Front End (JS/CSS/HTML) and/or Python Engineers. Also, Test Engineers.

Axial enables small-to-medium-size companies to connect with advisors and sources of capital at a scale not possible in the offline world. We use Python, PostgreSQL, Backbone, and Angular.js. We have automated tests for many things.

We're located in the Flatiron district near Union Square. Well funded and growing fast.

Email me (jon.rosebaugh@axial.net) with any questions or take a look at our careers page: http://www.axial.net/about/careers/

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For me it was when I ran out of savings, sold all my stocks, ran out of that money, and still didn't have a shipped product. My cofounders are still going at it, and I wish them all the best, but we spent the critical months of our startup designing and redesigning a thing without ever getting user feedback.

For all the other folks out there at Google or other largish companies, who are considering quitting and forming a startup: Don't do it until you have at least once seen a project through from conception to launch.

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Redesigning without feedback is so painful to experience, can completely understand.

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I recently joined a NYC company with "unlimited vacation days", and they do actually mean it. I mentioned this very trend when I was interviewing. They responded by saying they expect me to take AT LEAST three weeks of vacation a year.

Now, some of my coworkers are workaholics and won't take that much. But I have had success in just saying "I want to take these weeks off."

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If you want to work with bytes on stdin and stdout, Python 3 documents how to do that, at the same place it documents the stdin and stdout streams.

https://docs.python.org/3/library/sys.html#sys.stdin

All you have to do is use sys.stdin.buffer and sys.stdout.buffer; the caveat is that if sys.stdin has been replaced with a StringIO instance, this won't work. But in Armin's simple cat example, we can trivially make sure that won't happen.

I'd be a lot more willing to listen to this argument if it didn't overlook basic stuff like this.

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Yes, the documentation mentions that you can use buffer and follows that by a sentence explaining that you can do this unless you can't:

> Note that the streams may be replaced with objects (like io.StringIO) that do not support the buffer attribute or the detach() method and can raise AttributeError or io.UnsupportedOperation.

So no this is neither basic nor easy to do correctly in general. That's only the case, if you are writing an application and use well-behaved libraries that handle the edge cases you introduce.

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I guess it's a little odd that Python 3 treats stdin and stdout by default as unicode text streams. And sys.argv is a list of unicode strings, too, instead of bytes.

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I like Python 3's unicode handling but I agree that this seems strange. It is because people expect to see "characters" from these interfaces after treating them as ASCII-only for so long. If Python 3 had insisted on real purity with bytes objects I think it would have died a long time ago. Which is sad.

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> I'd be a lot more willing to listen to this argument if it didn't overlook basic stuff like this.

Just because there's a way around this particular issue doesn't mean that the attitude of Unicode by default of Python 3 isn't problematic. There's also sys.argv, os.listdir, and other filename stuff which Python 3 attempts to decode.

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And if computer science were a field in which men have historically been underrepresented, with company after company having culture issues about "femprogramming culture", your Turing Initiative might have a reason to actually exist.

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Even if it did have a reason to exist it would still be discriminatory which was my actual point.

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Since paying Dropbox is not an acceptable solution for me, I've asked Loom to refund the money I paid them (perhaps foolishly, I signed up for the $50-per-year plan and paid up front).

So far, they've refused: "Thanks for writing and we appreciate your position. Unfortunately, I am very sorry but I cannot offer you a refund at this time."

This is very disappointing.

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Well, this is awfully disappointing. I'm in the process of migrating my stuff off of Dropbox due to the Dr. Rice issue (only problem is a lot of apps use it as their sole syncing service); I have no desire to move gigabytes of photos into Dropbox's control.

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FYI Dropbox is one of the places you can import/sync from https://picturelife.com/settings/networks (need to login first)

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