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@sama: is one of the intentions for this group to acquire patents, so that you may be able to use them in defense for YC companies?

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No--all IP developed is free to the world, so we wouldn't be able to use it defensively.

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It is possible to structure it as "patent granted to everyone, but expires the moment they bring up a lawsuit against us or any of our licensees" to do doubly good for the world.

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Then it would no longer be free.

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It's not public domain, for sure, but it is free, for some definition of 'free', similar to GNU GPL.

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Well, everyone would be able to use YC Research's public outputs defensively as prior art.

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Apparently not.

  YCR is a non-profit.  Any IP developed will be made available freely to everyone. 

  We’re not doing this with the goal of helping YC’s startups succeed or 
  adding to our bottom line.

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you could allow free use of patents under a license that requires the entity doing so to also allow free use of their patents. If you believed the patent system is largely counter productive (as I do), this would be an awesome way of trying to address this a constructive way.

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what YC could get out of it ( besides making the world a better place ) is very good knowledge of the capabilities of potential entrepreneurs. Imagine one of these researchers then founding a startup. Funding that would be a lot less risky, so that's quite a bit of edge

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Don't forget, there's the ongoing storage cost at S3, which also adds up really quickly.

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3 cents/GB is cheap. Go 1 cent a GB S3's infrequent access class (since you won't be incurring the charge for retrieval through S3, you'll be pulling back out through Snowball), and its even cheaper.

$10/TB/month? Where else can I store data reliably that cheap? (Yes, Backblaze is half that price. I hope they become a worthy adversary to AWS S3 to drive prices further down).

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iCloud is $10/TB/mo, albeit for different use cases.

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If you have moderate volume, you can beat S3 pricing with object solutions like DDN or others. It all depends on your data center capacity and power costs.

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If it cost you about $1000 to buy a diskpack (4*6TB drives) you could create backups and send them to at least a half dozen locations for less money than using S3 to store that data.

Yes, S3 is cheap(ish). But given Snowball is a snapshot backup service, it's not comparatively cheaper than it would be to distribute that same data by creating a clone and sending it to a safe place.

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That's not really how business IT works (unless you're sending tape off to Iron Mountain, which has its own costs and storage fees).

S3 is the cheapest "real" business storage option besides Backblaze's new storage offering. S3 can't be compared to shipping disks someplace where they sit offline.

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If you are just using it for backup, you wouldn't use S3. You'd use Glacier.

What this offers is a useful way to get TBs of data up to Amazon easily, cheaply, and quickly.

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If it is cold storage, you could use AWS Glacier (https://aws.amazon.com/glacier/pricing/) which is way cheaper than S3.

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Say I wanted to do something similar, but move data around locally between two NAS appliances, but not incur a double disk charge - (i've got a pack of ~ 20 disks in NAS brand a, but i want to move to NAS brand b. The disks work in both, but need reformatting).

Does anyone know of a service where I could rent a 20TB device like snowball but not push it to S3?

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I know Dell has glorified portable harddrive arrays in pelican styles cases for moving data between their SAN systems. Unfortunately I don't recall the name and I don't know if they are available for rental. If you have a Dell VAR, have them ask the Dell storage group.

Edit: Correction, it doesn't appear to be an array, just single device so 1.5-2TB max. Also basically targeted at this SAN solution only.

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Yeah, I need to move 20TB in one go - so i can repurpose the disks.

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https://www.synology.com/en-us/products/DS1515+#spec

5 * 6TB drives, RAID5 would put you at nearly 24TB of storage, if my brain is in gear.

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He wants to rent something temporarily, so that he can copy stuff off the drives, take them out of the nas, format them in the new nas so it's compatible, copy stuff off the rented appliance to the new nas, ship the rented thing back off.

He wants to avoid having to have to buy enough drives, etc, to hold all of the data at once

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Re the environmental impact: A large contingent of internet networked servers are webservers, transacting with the HTTP protocol (be it spiders or producers or whatever). If it takes more computing resources to provide HTTP/2.0, then it would in fact require more servers, and thus increase the energy consumption.

But given how large datacenter consumers are considering how to build greener/smarter operations to reduce their impact (and costs) then clearly it's something to be mindful of.

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How do you define enterprise? I've been using ruby in projects I wouldn't call 'startup' for the last several years... including with teams up to 80 people (i.e. real enterprise)

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The point is that it's not sufficient to run the current 20k tests against head daily; there are so many unplanned variations and 'emergent' design that there's a full time job just in keeping up with the changes to MRI ruby.

And even if there wasn't, @brixen has repeatedly pointed out how the MRI authors have chosen to ignore the RubySpec project entirely. That's really sad.

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You're assuming they a: notice and pay attention to the road, and b: they're familiar with how to drive, so know that is a trickier maneuver, and c: that they know how well you drive, so can contextualize a pause based on your ability.

nope, it doesn't happen in real life.

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You've never had someone pause a conversation while you merge onto a highway?

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Me personally? Not without asking, no.

I have been in far more close calls as a result of being distracted by my passengers than by my cell phone.

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You can implement the pin-pad via the square app. doesn't need to be implemented in hardware.

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Not if you want approval from the payment card industry you can't.

They'll want proof that no other app can access the screen, that screen presses can't be recorded and lots of other stuff.

I'm going through this with a hardware pinpad at the moment, the list of requirements is very long and quite stringent.

--edit-- I'm not saying this is impossible, but I find it very unlikely. All the other EMV devices I know of that are designed for use with iOS and Android devices have built-in hardware pinpads because it's just easier... the PCI is very precious about PIN data. For good reason.

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ideologically, i agree, except that HFJ/H&C produce some amazing timeless typefaces and it's really hard to ignore that.

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Agreed, they own some of the most well known typefaces in the world. Sadly, their pricing is absurd.

For example, I run a forum with a million daily page views. If I wanted to use Gotham, I need to pay $150 for the font, and then subscribe to their cloud service and pay $450 per month for that amount of page views.

I might be willing to pay a one-time $100 fee to use one of their fonts, or a $100 per year subscription to use any of their fonts. However, $5,500 a year for my site? That's almost as much as my servers. It's a laugh, I'll stick with the well respected free web fonts.

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might be kind of interesting to do an IamA on reddit. I'd like to hear more about what it's like to work in HPCs -- even simply considering how to build that kind of processing and how to think in terms of jobs that take real time to complete.

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