Hacker Newsnew | comments | show | ask | jobs | submit | iamdave's comments login

Shows up for me, Chrome 43 OSX 10.10.1

-----


It shows up also on Firefox 38 Ubuntu 12.04, Adblock Plus 2.6.9.1-signed.

-----


I'd consider telling an autonomous citizen what they can and cannot do with their bodies in the absence of disparate impact to the rest of the social community at large to be pretty abhorrent, and the definition of "personhood" was used to do exactly that in US abortion debates.

-----


Somehow I don't think that's what anyone is doing here.

-----


It's not a javascript library, but MapBox recently released the Directions API for pathfinding within the context of mapping: https://www.mapbox.com/developers/api/directions/

So...somewhat relevant to what you're asking.

-----


Directions algorithms on real life maps are quite different from what they teach you in CS classes. Just think of the amount of computation to get the best directions between SF and NYC, taking traffic into consideration. I'm pretty sure none of the services actually give you the best solution, but something that's pretty close to it.

Full USA map graph contains around 24 million nodes, 58 million edges. Your regular A* just doesn't cut it.

-----


Better distance estimates and better graphs can push A* to work on larger problems. ALT gives better distance estimates: http://research.microsoft.com/pubs/64511/tr-2004-24.pdf (PDF link) (or these slides http://www.cs.princeton.edu/courses/archive/spr09/cos423/Lec... ). Transit nodes do too, I think. Contraction hierarchies and arc flags let you preprocess the graph to give better information to A*.

(I've not implemented any of these myself)

-----


I'm sure you're right, but it seems like traffic would be easy enough to consider by simply increasing specific edges' costs.

As for the scale issue: most of these nodes and edges will never change, so it might be possible to calculate a Dijkstra map.

-----


The point is, if you add traffic into consideration, you can't have almost anything precalculated.

-----


A* runs faster if you have better path cost estimates. To get the shortest paths, you want an estimate that's as close to the true cost, but not greater than it. You can precalculate to generate good estimates. Traffic makes the costs higher than normal, so those precalculated estimates are still useable (if you raise the costs because of traffic, the estimates continue to be lower than the true cost), and still much better than what you get without precalculation.

-----


> but I've never seen the layouts advocated here

I work in one right now as a sysadmin and I absolutely hate it. The very first image you see up there? The 8 desks just rammed against each other? I work in one of those.

I absolutely despise it to the point where I'm most often sitting in the server room at a table against a wall more than I'm at my own desk.

-----


About Uber? Absolutely nothing. About you? That you choose to use a different product.

Are you looking for some kind of congratulations on your grandstanding?

-----


You can choose be be obtuse or you can see that people might use an alternative if they believe service is going to decline.

-----


While I'm sure it would be difficult to enforce, services like Airbnb and HomeAway would probably cooperate in disclosing booked stays per address. It wouldn't be that hard to link the data together and spot violators.

I can say with first hand knowledge, that HomeAway at least engages with cities politically to build cases for short-term rental advocacy from economic development to enabling and increasing the attractiveness of tourism in cities where they operate. They setup sessions with city and community leaders and work on actionable regulation and legislation with cities to introduce fair laws for rentals.

I'm no shill for HomeAway, but I do have a close personal friend who works on the Government Affairs team and have witnessed their efforts with my own eyes. At least in their case, HomeAway works with cities, instead of against them.

-----


Uber made claims that "thousands of jobs" would be lost in the move

I've got a lot of reservations about calling Uber/Lyft a "job" in the first place; in fact I have a lot of problems with these "sharing economy" apps-calling them jobs when really you're just subcontracting labor on the cheap while the business side collects massive investments and benefits for the full-time employees.

It's like when you drive by a Dominos Pizza {substitute with the chain of your choice} and they have signs "make $15/hr"; you'll maybe make $15/hr on an incredibly busy day or a sudden surge in ride requests, but what's the mean? Is $15/hr the mean? If not, you don't get to advertise "make $15/hr".

I said it once at the start of all of these talks two years ago: It's becoming increasingly apparent to me that "disruption" in so many startups more recently means less "disruption with the goals of bringing about much needed substantive change to local regulation" and more like "give my company special treatment to operate". And it's a hard pill for cities to wave off when the population centers are all clamoring for an alternative to taxis.

okay I'm done ninja editing.

-----


Especially because they argue that they are not a taxi company because they are doing "ride sharing". Well are you ride sharing or are you a limousine service with jobs on the line?

-----


Funny you mention that, given Uber was forced to roll back its claims that you could easily make $90K a year as an Uber driver... (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/12/04/uber-driver_n_62496... amongst many others).

-----


I think I agree with you, but I'm hesitant to to slight somebody for how they making an honest living. All "jobs" aren't created equal, especially of many jobs are contracted or low paying without benefits. It's unfortunate that this kind of (presumably it's political in origin) rhetoric has colored our reality as it has.

-----


Or narratively describes the product to customers already accustomed to the value add of product x, but need ancillary features and benefits not present in x. I'm of the opinion that comparing one product to another only devalues the one if the other is objectively a bad product.

-----


Isn't that a benefit and reason to use html5 video over gif formats?

-----

More

Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | DMCA | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: