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I'm struggling to find an example of the auto-generated API so I can evaluate a bit. Add a link?

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By definition, the auto-generated APIs are specific to your Airtable Bases (eg, databases or mini-apps), so you need to first sign up for Airtable and then go to Airtable.com/api to choose a Base for which to view documentation. Sorry if this wasn't clear!

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That particular story seems like reasonable behavior on the doctor's part. But my personal experience has been that no doctor has ever brought up anything but pills to treat any condition I've had or my wife has had (and we've each had a condition that we later mitigated with a relatively small amount of experimentation, once we sort of realized it was up to us).

So to me the answer is "The doctor needs to start with non-pill solutions (if they make sense), then if the patient gets pushy or is uncooperative resort to pills, with fair warning that for the most part she's treating symptoms instead of the root cause." Does that sound like a reasonable compromise that we should all be able to agree on?

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No, I can't agree.

The doctor should do what their training and experience leads them to believe will lead to the best outcome for the patient. Pills are not evil. Optimise for good outcomes.

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Doctors are trained to use pills to treat conditions, so that's what their experience is in. Few have training in other treatment modalities; you can't get reimbursed for many other treatment modalities; you can't carry out an effective CBT session or really work on behavioral change in 12-15 minutes. Doctors are very well-trained in a very narrow area, which emphasizes pharmaceutical approaches.

That's why many good docs refer you (to a physical therapist or dietician or psychologist) if they are aware of other effective non-pharmaceutical treatments for your condition.

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I'm assuming this is specific to the United States? My anecdotal experience in Canada has been that it is not unusual for doctors to misdiagnose, but pill pushing isn't particularly a problem.

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In the US I've been to 5 doctors over the past 10 years (lots of moving), and none have ever been pill pushing.

I'd say maybe it's region specific but I've been on the East coast, Midwest, and West Coast.

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Yeah, not much of a problem in the UK either. The US system is a bit unusual. I daresay they'll still prescribe the pills if you ask - there are an awful lot of people on antidepressants.

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Not that this is a simple answer politically, but every time I see an article about whether we should use water on almonds[1] or alfalfa[2] or six endangered fish, I wish we would just price water more appropriately, and let more valuable uses of water win out over less. Wouldn't solve this particular issue, but a more appropriate price for this decision would at least help focus minds on what exactly is the tradeoff.

This sort of thing: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/15/business/economy/the-price...

[1] http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/future_tense/2014/0...

[2] http://gizmodo.com/seriously-stop-demonizing-almonds-1696065...

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Pricing water appropriately would be great, but there's more to this issue than that. In a nutshell: what is the value of keeping a fish species from going extinct? That's a policy question requiring public debate.

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The public debate has already come and gone. The law is written. The fish wins.

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Maybe everyone should just move out of California. Or perhaps they could all just euthanize themselves? That would save a lot of water. Certainly saving six fish is far for important.

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They should mandate water supply for endangered species and then after that price water at the same price for everyone. Much of the current agriculture would become unviable and the farmers could switch to either less thirst crops, growing somewhere wetter or just get some comp and do something else. Agricultural water use would plummet. Problem solved. Apart from politics of course.

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Your posting of this a little while back has caused me to think to myself "Geez, 'Principle of charity' would be useful here" over and over and over since you originally posted that. Really useful name to put to a concept like that. So. Thanks!

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We've been working hard on a more intuitive regression interface:

. Plain-English description of results

. Inline data transformations (e.g., taking a log)

. Automatic diagnostic charts and distribution visualizations

. Automatic alerts to common issues (e.g., funky residual plot)

. Plain-english guides to regression [1] and interpreting residuals [2]

. M-estimation instead of OLS

This is of course a work in progress, so we'd love to get feedback on this. Particularly if you see something in the docs you don't agree with.

[1] http://docs.statwing.com/user-friendly-guide-to-regression/

[2] http://docs.statwing.com/interpreting-residual-plots-to-impr...

(Logistic regression is also in the works, we'll probably do a "Show HN" for that later, so please hold comments on it)

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I've tried quite a few things and the most useful thing for me has been https://www.headspace.com/ . It's "daily" guided meditation (that after not too long is barely guided). The narrator's voice is really good, not too hippie, very calming. Everything is pleasant and well-designed.

This was also pretty good, if you'd rather read a book: http://www.amazon.com/Search-Inside-Yourself-Unexpected-Achi...

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Edit: Do you pay for headspace or just use their 10 minute? I just signed up.

Thanks for the book suggestion, I just bought this book.

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Just to clarify: I think you're saying that the best societal answer is what you suggest. I agree (as I agree with eitally).

The best if-you're-pregnant-right-now solution, though, is different, since currently very few hospitals allow birth in their physical location without a hospital physician.

The calculus in that case is probably a tradeoff of unlikely but very bad outcomes (death by homebirth) vs quite likely somewhat-bad outcomes (unnecessary Caesarean, unnecessary rushing, etc., by hospital), I'd think.

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Our son was delivered at a hospital by a midwife that was part of a team of 2 midwives (CPNP/CNM) and 2 doctors (OB/GYN). If things got beyond her capability she could call in the doctors for backup. Our daughter was delivered by one of the doctors due to him being on call.

So, nurse midwifes do deliver in hospitals. I actually think they are not allowed to do home births or they can lose their license.

(In the US)

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Wow, I'm surprised how powerful that effect is. I only played for a couple minutes (very cool), and I think it's been about a minute of my vision waving.

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Really good stuff, really nicely done, I love it. And good pre-Christmas launch timing :)

Small issue: I grabbed an .m4a, uploaded it, and the screen just sat there. Console errors and whatnot. Didn't take a rocket scientist to guess that .mp3 might work better (it did). So I'm all good, but just reporting it.

Again, really good stuff, congrats.

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Thanks for pointing this out. Right now, we're supporting wav and mp3, but I'll be adding a couple things in the very near future - greater support for various file formats, and better error handling for the ones we don't support.

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Agreed. From the article Nostromo just posted[1], looks like the mouse models were based on aspartame, saccharin, and sucralose, and the human subjects were taking saccharin.

[1] http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22329872.600-artificia...

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