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It's definitely the people who are least inclined to install an ad blocker that could use it most.

On the other hand, it takes a long time, but they do learn to be more cynical about the Internet if they're exposed to its raw state.

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It takes less than sixty seconds and requires nothing more than installing a browser extension.

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The people who most need to do this don't know what a "browser" is, much less an "extension".

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I think they meant that it takes the users a long time to learn to be cynical.

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This is a good point. I often take for granted how quickly I can recognize advertisement from non advertisement. I attribute most of it to spending my early days on the Internet reading marketing forums and running ad campaigns myself. Nowadays marketing is very subtle. Often you find yourself reading content and don't even realize somebody paid for that content to build their brand, drive traffic, etc. Look at recipe sites for example. If you watch your ad blocker count the ads, recipe sites always have one of the highest numbers. Who would ever think that if they didn't know what to look for?

My rule of thumb is "if nobody would write this without getting paid for it, then somebody probably got paid for it."

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Files, and the ordering of folder hierarchy from left to right, was developed by Unix in the 1970s.

Domain names (DNS) were developed in 1985 to locate things on the Internet, entirely separately, with the opposite hierarchical ordering.

The convention of locating files on a system identified by a domain name wasn't developed until 1992 and standardized in 1994 as a URL.

As a result, we have two hierarchical orderings for two separate things, because they were merged later on.

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Note that postal addresses, at least in the United States, also order lines in descending specificity. I presume that long predates the Internet, and I wonder if it is in any way related.

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Only because you've gotten used to it. Right now you have to learn that [domain]/[filepath] is a thing.

If it was done in the same direction as folders, you wouldn't even have to know anything about domains.

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> It must be an April fools joke

Maybe considering their history of product announcements (Amazon Echo), they're being cautious about it this time. If it gets mocked, they'll just say "Oh it was an April Fool's joke"

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That's terrible. Imagine being the team who built that product, only to have them say, "Too many people thought it was a joke, sorry"

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That's my guess. Nor eat way to test the waters with a product announcement without putting your neck fully out there.

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I'm not sure the classic output mode fixes the problems. I still see some street names not showing up, and it still arbitrarily resizes my map and moves around when I do a search, which it never did in the really old versions.

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OMG it's not just me? The lack of street names both on desktop and mobile is so frustrating.

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The U.S. is obligated to protect and defend individuals and corporations that don't violate U.S. policy. Not some foreign policy.

If the U.S. government is not going to protect us from this shit, then what is the purpose of our military?

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> Toxoplasma gondii, can override a rodent's most basic survival instincts. The result is a rodent that does not race away from a cat but is instead strangely attracted to it.

Perhaps humans who think cats are cute are actually experiencing the same effect from the parasite.

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Perhaps cats are just cute?

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> Could not successfully run query from DB: User 'lutheran_insults' has exceeded the 'max_questions' resource (current value: 75000)

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> Realistically, it would be both hard to change structurally

Perhaps there is a simpler solution. Here's one idea: for accounting purposes, only count a limited number of plays per month, per user. It can be the first 100 plays, or if you want to prevent any biasing, it can be a random sample of 100 of each user's plays.

A random sampling can even be audited to prove that it was fair.

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I don't think sampling's even necessary. Presumably Spotify log every play. If they pushed their logs into BigQuery or something similar, it would be trivial to calculate the revenue breakdown the way the OP describes. 'Big data' is here, and it works. With 100 million users at 1000 tracks per month, we're 'only' talking about 100 billion or so rows to process each month.

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Why do we consider that the places who play 24/7 of pop music are biasing the system? If it were 1 cent per play, and Mickael Jackson was played 100 times during the day in one shop... shouldn't they get $1?

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If you consider two types of users - average users (10-20 plays a day?) and power users (500-1000 plays per day), both users contribute $10 to the system. Most of the money that the average users contribute ends up sent to the authors of songs that the power users play.

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> why are we assuming that light users prefer indie bands and heavy users prefer pop music?

The article explained this - because heavy users are playing music 24/7 at gyms, etc., and never play the smaller groups or genres that only some individuals like (and would like to support).

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Interesting. I'm sure people are doing this illegally, but technically you're supposed to buy a commercial Spotify license for public performance.

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"Spotify Free, Unlimited, and Premium accounts are for personal, non-commercial use only."

I can't imagine it's being done illegally regularly. It would be way to easy to identify by stream behavior.

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Don't CD's say the same thing?

I think it depends on local copyright laws, but I think in most places you buy a license to play music publicly and with that license you are allowed to play any music legally acquired.

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