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Later on the article it reads

  So the day after achieving the highest score in WoW
So I suppose the initial sentence of "highest level" is not correct. I guess they are talking about "Server Rankings" - i.e. http://www.wowprogress.com/realms/rank/us

Which is very hard (apparently) to accomplish and I think they get reset now and then. There are other key achievements in WoW such as being the first guild to kill a boss etc.

So I think he was actually ranked #1 in the server, that's what "highest score" refers and that can take months.

I don't know much about WoW but I have a friend who still brags about his #1 in a WoW server 5 years ago :), so it's a big deal.

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> Which is very hard (apparently) to accomplish and I think they get reset now and then. There are other key achievements in WoW such as being the first guild to kill a boss etc.

These are the same thing. When a new raiding tier is released the rankings become relevant to that tier, so the first guild to kill the final boss on the hardest level of difficulty (currently Mythic) becomes the world first guild.

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Not VC backed-up but we are fairly big. We are building a web application security scanner - www.netsparker.com

It's Windows only / .NET

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One of those things...

Friendfeed was technically better medium than twitter in every single way at the time (maybe still) yet it died (don't mean that it failed). Another example of why making social startups is a huge risk.

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It was much better for me than Twitter, but once the acquisition happened (FB w/ a rumored $50M), they decided to show the middle finger to its users. Isn't this the same as what happened to the thesixtyone (t61)?

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They kept the service running for more than five years after the aqui-hire. I wouldn't call that showing the middle finger.

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I suspect he was referring to the FriendFeed founders giving their user community the middle finger by cashing out to Zuck. People are going to do what is in their own self interest so you can’t exactly blame the founders for that.

As I recall FriedFeed’s growth had plateaued so they probably figured it wasn’t going to compete with FB and Twitter. Mobile and apps were also starting to take the world then too.

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Did t61 even get acquired? They seemed to just toss their users for fun.

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Shameless plug:

If you are looking for something like this for non-Google App Engine web applications we recently launched a SaaS Web Security Scanner - https://www.netsparker.com/online-web-application-security-s...

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Ironically new standard wider monitor screen ratios make you see nothing before scrolling, I guess we need to "above the fold" concept for web dev.

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"There is no fold" by Luke Wroblewski: https://storify.com/xiwcx/there-is-no-fold-1

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A Pinboard user here. When I signed up I hoped there would be nice browser integration but it's just not there. UX for me is just rubbish compared to native bookmarking or to even old delicious extensions.

Honest question, why Pinboard is any better than using integrated Chrome bookmarks sync feature? (ignoring the archive feature of Pinboard)

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Hm, would you expand on what you disliked about the integration? You're using the bookmarklet, right? I just click on "pin this" whenever I want to save the current webpage, and click on "my pinboard" whenever I want to look for a bookmark.

The killer feature for me is being able to type in a description for each bookmark, because later on you can search by any word in that description.

I've given up on tagging anything though.

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Was definitely for me too, been lately using fetching.io for the same thing but without having to bookmark. No integration though with pinboard yet

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That's interesting, I've almost given up on typing descriptions and instead have a very large number of tags that I pull up quickly with the autocomplete. It's funny how our use has gone in opposite direction. Pinboard is great for me, and I like the spartan, but functional, UI.

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Yes I do, it's slow to load, there is no search from the browser (which is a show stopper for me), it's not as good as "Ctrl + D" kind of bookmarking that you have in Chrome.

And if it's not adding anything on to the bookmarking and comes with a worse UX, why bother?

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It is actually the archiving that is the main benefit of Pinboard. Then tagging and commenting the links for yourself, in order make it easier for you to find it later. The goal is to keep there more than what you'd bookmark. The bookmark is for me "I expect I'll be visiting this often." The link in Pinboard is "my archive of the stuff I've once read on the web that I can need later to refer to, in the state it was as I've read it." That includes the content as it was at the time I've read it, not just the link. And I want to be able to comment it for myself and tag it to easily find it later. If you just need the bookmarks, use the bookmarks.

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This is what I use Evernote for. Why do you like Pinboard better? (Not challenging--actually curious. I've never used Pinboard.)

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I try to like Evernote, especially because I read a lot of PDF papers and annotated screen shots are nice, but I have 3000+ Pinboard bookmarks because they are just much, much easier and faster to create than Evernote notes.

I didn't understand what the fuss was about with Delicious and (later) Pinboard, and didn't start using Pinboard in earnest until a year or so ago, but now that I've got archiving running and full-text search, I have no idea what I would ever do without Pinboard.

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Thanks. I use the Evernote "clipper" extension in my browsers, which lets me save either the URL, the article content, or the full web page to Evernote. I can tag them, and edit the text to include additional info (one frequent addition--a link to the HN discussion of that article).

I'm sort of in similar shoes in that I've been doing this for a while, so I've got hundreds of saved pages and dozens of tags in Evernote. So I feel like Pinboard would need to be much better to overcome that inertia.

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I've never used Evernote but from their web site, it's a quite different service, Evernote is more like kind-of Google docs than what the Pinboard is (the "social bookmarking for the introverts" with the automatic archiving of the content behind the links).

Evernote premium is 5 EUR per month, that makes 60 EUR per year, v.s. cca 20 EUR per year for Pinboard Archive.

And Pinboard is much more minimalistic, and I like that: it doesn't force me to "install the apps" or whatever. I add the bookmarklet and I visit the Pinboard site, that's enough for all the devices I have.

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evernote has a long history of data just magically dissapearing

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I find a simple webpage to be a better UI for bookmarks than the browser dropdown maze. I suppose it matters how you use bookmarks. If you use them to go to the same sites all of the time (something that I do not do) then I suppose having your common sites in a single drop-down is nicer. Although you could have a tag in Pinboard and make that your homepage.

What I use Pinboard for is bookmarking interesting articles I want to read later, recipes I want to try later, websites that are awesome but I want to visit infrequently etc. and the simple interface of Pinboard is perfect for that, imo.

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You don't need to use the dropdown, you can open the bookmarks panel that shows a list and a search box.

In Firefox, you can even make it your homepage, just set it to: chrome://browser/content/bookmarks/bookmarksPanel.xul

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I don't see how that interface is nearly as good as Pinboard's. I guess we just have different tastes.

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In Safari, for "native" Pinboard integration across any browser connected via iCloud, I make a favorites bar folder with primary category tags as individual bookmarklets. This shows up as a dropdown menu in Safari UI for Favorites.

Then I can bookmark and tag anything into a primary category with a single click. The bookmarklets look like this:

    javascript:q=location.href;p=document.title;void(t=open('https://pinboard.in/add?later=yes&tags=vod&noui=yes&jump=close&url='+encodeURIComponent(q)+'&title='+encodeURIComponent(p),'Pinboard','toolbar=no,width=100,height=100'));t.blur();
In addition to tagging the item, this is also archiving it for future reference. Don't ignore the archive, it's worth the $25 if you save even a single needed reference from bit rot.

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One thing I've loved is that many iPhone Twitter and news apps have had Pinboard integration for ages. See something cool on Flipboard, tap a couple of buttons, and have it in my saved links later when I'm at my laptop. Pinboard actually goes one better with its Twitter integration: if I star a tweet, it gets saved to Pinboard. With all these sources, I use Pinboard as an inbox for everything I want to read later.

With iOS 8's share sheet extensions and a great native client that supports the feature, I can do this with almost all iPhone apps that don't already directly support Pinboard.

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It’s nice being able to keep bookmarks when switching browsers (at least it makes me feel less locked in).

It’s also nice being able to share bookmarks with your friends.

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Both Firefox and Chrome allow importing bookmarks from other browsers, and exporting them as a plain HTML file.

Personally, I also don't see the point unless you're using the Archive feature. Firefox Sync is free, encrypted, and available even if the servers are offline.

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What's wrong with the UX? Do you use the bookmarklet? I can't imagine how it could possibly get any more convenient than that.

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Not exactly piracy stopped or something but here is an example a successful DRM that stopped crackers for a month of two for couple of games and the results of how it effected games' sales: http://www.dsogaming.com/news/report-denuvo-drm-system-has-b...

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£30K a year, tax etc. on top of it. Do you do tech business or something else? Office costs, extra overhead, insurance etc. It's really hard to run a company that cheap. This is not about "offices in manhattan". Even one office in the UK around a decent place for 30 people will be quite expensive to run.

I'm just curious, is this is tech company, how many of those people are developers / designers (high skill required tech workers)? How is it really possibly to run a company that cheap in the UK?

I would love to hear the things that you do for lowering the costs.

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Tech. 22 technical. 8 management. Wouldn't be hanging out here if I made coat-hangers for a living. :)

We accrued cash and bought a commercial lease with a decade to run from a bankrupt company - prime real estate in the centre of a creative city. Before here, we based ourselves out of a squat, and after we left agreed a retroactive amount of rates to pay the council to turn a blind eye to our having been there. It really pays to shirk estate agents and to instead do "huh, that building is suddenly empty - let's call the owner".

Insurance is also surprisingly cheap, so long as you indemnify yourself against consequential loss, which in our business is a must.

"Extra overhead" runs to not much - maybe a few £k a month.

Oh, and this isn't included in my figure, but is something EVERYBODY WHO RUNS A TECH BUSINESS IN THE UK SHOULD BE AWARE OF - R&D Tax Credits! HMRC cut us a cheque every April.

I'd actually rather we spend a bit more and perhaps become unprofitable for a while, as I want to invest in growth more heavily, but my partner, the loveable tightwad that he is, needs deep justification for every penny spent.

And that's the crux of it. Go into business with the tightest person you know, and spend forever fighting about it, and end up with pretty optimal budgetary decisions, as everything has to be thought/fought about.

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Do you have an example of a project where you got R&D Tax Credits?

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My previous employer would claim credits on all development of new products. Not maintenance of existing products, not operations costs, and not features that a customer had asked for specifically. But over half of our technical staff were building new apps to expand our reach into new markets, and the management put all of that in for credits. They'd also claim on new features added to existing apps.

There was an annual exercise where a couple of poor managers dumped the whole year's stories from the project management tool and classified them all as creditable or not. Not a lot of fun, but the CFO was always happy with the results!

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We are using .NET Stack for our web app scanner. Both for desktop and (https://www.netsparker.com/web-vulnerability-scanner/) and SaaS versions use .NET (https://www.netsparker.com/online-web-application-security-s...)

We started with Bizspark as well, now we graduated and license cost is not much really. We also rely on MS stack for many things other than source code repository / CI etc.

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Schneier said it best : "Complexity is the worst enemy of security"

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