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If all you're doing is start/stop/restart on Ubuntu you should take a look at Upstart[0]. See a simple example here: http://askubuntu.com/a/251581

[0] http://upstart.ubuntu.com/

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upstart is deprecated.

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Not that I know of. ChromeOS still uses it and though Ubuntu is phasing it out, they haven't completely gotten rid of it as a session manager yet AFAIK. They need to support it for a few more years anyway due to 14.04 LTS.

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That's exactly the difference between deprecated an obsolete. The former means it's on it's way to the latter. Putting work into upstart just means you'll have work migrating to systemd in less than a year or two.

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Traditionally in CS, concurrent != parallel. If you have a blocking operation (say a database read) your program can do something else while it waits for a response from the DB (this gives you pseudo-parallelism). That is the concurrency that evented frameworks like Node or EventMachine are usually associated with.

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Orkut, MySpace, Ning and other social networks had support for apps using OpenSocial around 2008. You had access to friends, FoFs, and several other social features.

For some time people ignored this platform, which meant that you could make a few million dollars per month porting successful FB games (Colheita Feliz, a FarmVille clone, comes to mind) since you faced virtually no competition.

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Mathematica, Cloud and Alpha are three examples of products that use this language (not exclusively but extensively). I would qualify these as large scale products.

I've been testing Cloud since April, and although I don't think the environment is ready for production yet, the problems are more related to the UI and the backend than to the actual language and libraries.

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This is a repost, past "discussions" here:

* https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=3007666

* https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=1469055

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> If Apple is "instructing" that firm, then they aren't representing their clients' interests correctly.

Sorry to pick on just one phrase of your comment but I'm honestly curious. How is the "not-representing the client's interests" thing a problem inside a court? Is it because the other side or the court will pick on it, or is it because it honestly does not represent a client's interests[0]?

[0] In this case, I can't imagine an app. developer not wanting help dealing with this specific problem, but I've never been in that position.

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> "Instruct the lawfirm to never settle"

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I automatically made the association in my mind that not only would they defend you, they'd fund the thing. Thanks for making my misunderstanding obvious :)

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Hey guys, Federico from MiCarga here. We're happy to answer any questions.

If some of the stuff in the letter sounds familiar it's probably because you've read it before in PG's recent fund-raising articles (recommended reads for everyone raising capital):

* How to raise money: http://paulgraham.com/fr.html

* How to convince investors: http://paulgraham.com/convince.html

* Investor Herd Dynamics: http://paulgraham.com/herd.html

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Thanks for the tip drakaal. As mmvvaa points out, general solicitation is now accepted in the US. We have talked to our lawyers and we think we're safe on this side, but if anyone with more knowledge wants to chime in we'd appreciate it.

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Solicitation in the US has to be qualified investors, and only after you have the copy approved by the Gov. It isn't as easy as sticking up a web page, and there are serious limitations to what you can say, and how often you can make changes.

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Thanks for the comment, Drakkal. We reviewed its legality carefully before making it public, and we trust that we are within the law.

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>>Solicitation in the US has to be qualified investors, and only after you have the copy approved by the Gov.

...no, not any more since Sep 23. You have to verify they're accredited investors before accepting any investment from them, but you can now broadcast your fundraising from the rooftops.

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We are in the same space and to be honest we were amazed by Keychain's launch. According to VentureBeat [0], they had 1 in every 500 trucks in the US on launch day (Aug '12). We launched in May of the same year and we know how hard it is to find good, qualified drivers.

Sadly, there's not a lot of public information about how Keychain works so I can't say for sure if we're doing the exact same thing. I do think we're seeing the same problem though: the last big change in cargo logistics was the introduction of containers for transportation (and that was decades ago). We can do better.

[0] http://venturebeat.com/2012/08/21/keychain-logistics-truckin...

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So, there's a competitor? Who cares? That means the market has validated your product, and now you have an enemy to motivate you.

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There are plenty of companies in the space. A quick browse on AngelList can give you a good idea of what's out there.

We certainly believe keychain is doing several things right. Even though they are focused in the US at the moment.

Our focus right now is LATAM, and would most likely head towards other developing markets before trying anything in the US.

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Our focus right now is LATAM, and would most likely head towards other developing markets before trying anything in the US.

That's probably the most pragmatic and best approach: to understand the needs of your specific market area and all of the participants, and nail them. Having met with Bryan a couple months ago, he understood the pain points in the US market (having basically grown up in the industry…) and nailed them. I'm sure he's learned more since we've last spoke with the help he has gotten to carry out his vision.

It's really great to see companies like these. Good Luck!

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Thanks :)

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Hi! This is an experiment we decided to run since we want to get this out to as many people as we can. Our network of investors is mainly based in LatAm and it's too small so this is our way of getting it out to the public.

It's long and detailed because we're tired of "elevator pitches", we want interested people to know as much as they can about our company and what we're aiming for. We feel this is more responsible (you as an investor know upfront what you're dealing with) and it's more time-efficient (we don't have to spend 20 minutes explaining what we do at the beginning of every call (that's actually BS, we still have to do this :P)).

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