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Here is a really good video describing how a low production hardware product got to market. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vIvTeHWfouA

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There is a lot of potential in solving mechanical problems with information systems, rather than using complicated mechanical solutions. For instance, hydraulic automatic transmissions and differential.

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The mechanical solutions are always really interesting and clever, but digital systems are much more flexible.

Really cool video on the mechanical ignition timing control in a delorean to control emissions. Explanation of ignition advance at the end: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ge1GwepqtK0

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Maybe from this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Z%C3%B3calo

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San Francisco, local or remote, full time or contract

Ruby, JavaScript, Objective-C, PHP, HTML, CSS, Java, C

https://github.com/CacheFactory

I've been an independent contractor for the past two years working on projects that mostly involve ROR, but also involve JavaScript, and Objective-C. I also have been working on my product Taskflow.io when I don't have contracting work. I am looking to join a fun, smart team again and make awesome products with cool people again.

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Your cert config on heroku is causing issues at taskflow.io

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https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCivA7_KLKWo43tFcCkFvydw

Applied Science is pretty cool. He is a master with electronics and fabrication.

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I am working on a similar project called Taskflow.io that is aimed at more backend business oriented tasks. It can do similar things through an interface flowchart editors where you make the actual flowchart that gets executed. I would still consider it a public beta. I would love your feedback.

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Will this be provided As-A-Service, or will it be a downloadable product that can be deployed in-house? This is exactly what I have been looking for for a while, but there's absolutely zero chance we're going to send any of our business information to a remote service.

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I've wondered about this quite a bit, since I run computationally intensive analysis on sensitive data, and some of the same thinking would apply in this context.

In brief, I could provide an appliance on something as trivial as a Raspi that updates itself over VPN, and would let you run the services on your own systems. Would that work for you if one of these providers did the same?

Obviously we could do better with a custom system deployed onsite, but the idea is to simplify the process and potentially eliminate cost of getting started; similar to Square sending out card readers.

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It depends. We've got pretty strict security requirements as we operate in the medical and government sector. A black box appliance or something that auto-updates outside of normal patching rounds is probably out of the question.

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It's as a service now. I've had other people express the same kind of concern with data security. We can talk about a self hosted version.

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Hey, I tried it, but I got stuck trying to set up a webhook, as there's nothing in the dropdown. Here is a screenshot:

http://shadowcatcher.mindcast.com/clips/1397535410d5p7t6ut3s...

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Crowded space... We're trying to go the same thing for business intelligence applications with a product we're launching called flowreports.co...

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There are other companies doing workflow automation, but their products seem clunky and not aimed at web-services, which companies are increasingly relying on. I want to be the IFTTT of back room office tasks. I want anyone in an organization to be able to create a workflow to automate some mundane process they have at their job. I would love any feedback you have of Taskflow.io so I can get my product to that level. Here is a link for any feedback you might have http://eddie.taskflow.io/start_process/201?return_url=http%3...

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As a lover of technology and science fiction I love this railgun. But as a taxpayer and pragmatist, I really think it is a waste. I can't see this being as accurate as a guided missile over long ranges, which is the most important thing for modern combat. So that leaves it as a good alternative for short range attacks, which I doubt it will ever be used in combat for.

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Drones don't need pilots which means they don't need pilot training which changes the economics of air-combat. For around ~100k you can build a long rang self guided drone which would be almost useless vs an aircraft carrier or a modern fighter. However, for ~10 billion you can have 100,000 of those suckers and the US does not have anywhere near that many air to air missiles and it's not going to take anywhere near 100k of them to takeout an aircraft carrier.

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However, $10 billion is a big number for everyone, including the US and China, although for them its at least possible. It's 150% of Iran's military budget and about 80% of North Korea's entire GDP.

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It's 150% of Iran's military budget in one year. Split that over 10 years and it's 15% of Iran's budget. Granted there would be maintenance costs and it's not 100% automated plus you they would need storage even if there taking off from dirt runways etc. But, they don't exactly need 100,000 to be a solid threat either.

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> But, they don't exactly need 100,000 to be a solid threat either.

At least as of October 1967, 1/25000 of that figure would have sufficed.

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>US does not have anywhere near that many air to air missiles

That is true, however the US also possesses a large number of anti-aircraft guns, with plenty of bullets. :-)

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I doubt this is an issue with a projectile moving seven times the speed of sound as long as the targeting system is accurate. Even if a warplane could be built to sustain mach 7, how would it turn to avoid the projectile?

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The Elysium future is looking more and more likely to me over a Star Trek future.

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For years we've heard the charge that pharmaceutical companies are little more than parasites creating perpetual users of their drugs rather than curing anything.

It's worth noting that this drug company is curing something significant and the fact that they're trying to make a go of a business out of it is a bad thing?

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I suspect first we'll have something that looks more like Elysium and then something that looks more like Star Trek.

I doubt we'll ever have either extreme (and different parts of the world will likely have different bits at different times).

Certainly going to be an interesting 100 years (but when has that ever not been true..).

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By the time the future gets here, all of today's patents would have expired long ago. Everything around today will be completely free. Not to mention replicators making manufacturing basically free as well.

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Two words. "Build Up". San Francisco needs high rise apartments.

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Two words. "Remote workers".

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That's not really going to fix it, I don't think. Quite a lot of people go to the Valley because they want to live, in the Valley. Until the days of Remote Coffeeshop'ing and Remote Dive Bar'ing, it's still going to be a highly desirable place to live with rents to match.

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Then it's a lifestyle decision. Rent isn't cheap in Manhattan or Hawaii either.

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Right, and like Manhattan and Hawaii, there are more than enough people with lots of money interested in that kind of lifestyle, to jack the prices up like crazy.

It's ironic to hear the ones who just made that same lifestyle decision complaining about the high prices. If you just moved to SF for the city life in spite of the rents when you could have worked in Texas, you're kind of part of the problem.

(And then everybody else fusses about how it isn't fair they can't afford a flat on Wall Street or a 2br house on the beach in Kauai)

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I grew up in SV, and there definitely is a generational divide though. Most of us (including my parents) moved to SV at some point in our lives, the only difference being whether this was in the 1970's or the 2010's.

The price of a house in SV has quadrupled (or more) in the last 25 years. Wages have increased,but not nearly as much. Newcomers have it disproportionately harder than the longtimers here.

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I didn't just move to Hawai'i, I've lived here my entire life.

That said, I agree with your comment.

I don't live in a mansion by the beach, I'm 22 miles inland, downhill from one of the world's most effusive volcanoes. Where I can afford to live.

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Not really sure how that would help matters though. High rises, especially the modern ones, tend to count as a higher form of living.

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Not when it is in a high risk zone with respect to earthquakes.

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Look up the 1989 earthquake. You'll see lots of photos of stick framed Victorians that failed. The highrises (which are designed to withstand earthquakes) are still here.

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Tokyo's been doing it for a while

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I've never thought of Tokyo as a tall city. The city-scape is generally max 6 story buildings. The tallest building in Tokyo is shorter than the tallest in San Francisco!

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Tokyo achieves more density than San Francisco because the average street width is about 14 feet. San Francisco's is about 90 feet. That creates a lot more buildable land per block and less traffic.

The average building height is also about 3 stories instead of just over two in SF. The majority of housing is single family houses and owner occupied. And Toyko has much, much less parking.

The result is a comfortable, walkable city at double the density of SF without high-rises and with less traffic.

The key difference is that SF is planned, laid out, regulated, permitted, and platted very badly and Tokyo is planned well.

Also, the peninsula cities are required by law to sprawl at low density, constricting SF's ability to spread medium-density growth that would keep housing affordable. Any upzoning, even around transit stops, is blocked and housing supply remains severely limited.

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>Also, the peninsula cities are required by law to sprawl at low density

Why is that? To protect people's vacation homes on the beach?

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_tallest_structures_in_T...

(There are a lot of tall buildings in Tokyo)

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The ones in SOMA and the new UCSF campus are all built on land reclaimed from the bay. In other words, rubble. When an earthquake hits, they are within a liquifaction zone. This is a zone that during earthquakes, behaves a little like a liquid.

The buildings they are putting up there, however, have foundations drilled down so deep, they are well in to the bedrock below. They aren't going to come down.

I don't know how I feel about being on the street if that happens, though.

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Like... say, Tokyo?

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I'm not super thrilled by this but at least it's better than GM acquiring Tesla.

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