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The conclusion is a total let down.

"Dust off your drop shadows and gradients, and introduce them to your flat color buttons and icons. Do your absolute best work without feeling restricted to a single aesthetic."

I feel like the author is admitting that they are completely constrained by the rules or whims of trend- and that breaking out of them is some kind of crazy paradigm shift- and that breaking them only involves mixing in the tired tropes of the last fashion into the tired tropes of the new one.

My experience is that its only the non-designers that feel constrained by fashion. The professionals push the boundaries - they are the ones that define it.

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Irrespective of his concerns as an individual- from a pure usability perspective: any waiting of any sort that does not signify some valuable piece of information is negative to user experience. We have seen time and time again that web speed optimizations show significant positive change in how people use or abandon different web tasks.

There may be some abhorrent business perspective that uses this loading time as a "this app is so complicated it takes minutes to load" type thinking- but this is pure snake oil. Ultimately being able to use a tool as soon as the need strikes and at a speed as close to your own thoughts as possible is the best user experience. Any decisions that are made (8 minute load time) based on technology contraints tend to impact user experience negatively.

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The UX is broken, but adding the start button would only break it more. I don't have much confidence in their design team, but I think they know there is no returning to the start button.

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Do you believe Samsung has benefited from Apple's R&D?

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A better question might be to flip that around, has Apple benefited from Samsung's R&D?

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Supposing the answer is yes (and I'm sure it is), Apple is paying Samsung for their R&D advances by buying Samsung's chips, LCD panels, etc. Does Samsung pay any royalties to Apple for copying elements of the iPhone's design?

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The question is whether or not you should have to pay another company for using design elements that are similar when there's no brand confusion on the part of consumers.

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This game is boring and pointless. Does Apple pay for the elements of iOS they copied from Samsung/Motorola or Google?

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I know they do pay Xerox a ton for Icons. The scrollbar settlement was huge as well.

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Did Samsung buy Xerox???

(I'm kidding :])

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Yes. The difference is that Apple is paying Samsung for that benefit.

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This is my understanding too. And I think the Metro look is going to perform particularly poorly when it is isolated to navigational components on a webpage while content follows whatever other visual form.

IMHO the real MS interface isn't very desktop/mouse friendly and the reason it works is because all of those square buttons are the only thing you can activate in the metro screens. If I put one rounded button in the metro interface I'll bet it would get clicked far more often than the other interface elements. It wonder if they tested it vs a more humanistic version?

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Interesting, would try to branch out some components with this thought :)

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Kudos to Next Web for celebrating interface innovation. The payment process looks super slick.

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It is ADD for sure, but there is a measured dopamine response to this type of interaction. The easiest way to understand the history of any object is through a timeline, so when appropriate I do think you are going to see a lot more of it.

From my vantage all of the modern social networks feel like the newest incarnation of the blog model, which has always had that timeline model.

Nir Eyal has some nice thoughts on it: http://www.nirandfar.com/2012/08/the-webs-slot-machine.html

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If you want a summary history for a unified object, the revchron presentation is natural and minimally abusive. (Though, we may yet find better standard presentations for hiding info that is attention-grabbing but lower-value.)

Mixing unrelated things, and making this mixed-history the default view, and optimizing it relentlessly for impressions/engagement -- those are all thiings that trend towards abusing people's attention. People will become more aware and less tolerant of such 'false excitement' UX over time, presenting more opportunities for designs and businesses that respect rather than squander our mental cycles.

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Good perspective!

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Sage advice. It took me longer than it should have to learn this.

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Brilliant!

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The apps look great for sure and it seems like the big dogs are prioritizing Android. Many of these examples are in fact on both platforms, and overall they look better on iOS than the android version. On Android they look like a modified, less 'pretty' version of the iOS app- particularly the ones that carry over iOS design patterns.

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> like the big dogs are prioritizing Android

Who are those big dogs? Google? :) Microsoft? :)) Apple? :)))

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I meant the big app developers. Its a throwaway comment for sure. I was just trying to encourage the original idea of the post while taking out its legs by pointing out how most of these don't look as good as they do on iOS.

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your original comment says one thing (prioritization of Android) then another (how a lot of Android apps repurpose iOS designs).

Are you saying there's a general appreciation for Android, so it's higher priority nowadays?... or are you saying Android is actually being prioritized over iOS? The latter would be surprising imo.

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So why not to name a few big app developers and their apps?

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