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I don't think "self-driving car" and "driveable car" are mutually exclusive. Self-driving mode for roads, highways, parking, commuting... manual override for the countryside.

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You should post an update here once you've worn one for a while. I had a Fitbit for a couple of months and just got bored of it.

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There's something extremely magic about knowing who is calling you when you're cycling and therefore whether to stop or not to take the call.

Also, changing music or volume when on a bus without having to do that thing where you lift your bum to get your phone out of your pocket is, well, better than it sounds.

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> changing music or volume when on a bus without having to do that thing where you lift your bum

Do Android phones still come without buttons on their headphones?

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My Galaxy Note 2 came with buttons on the headphones.

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I have been wearing a Fitbit for over a year, my wife for 6 months. I can't imagine life without it now. The Big advantage is it keeps me honest. I aim to always do 10,000 steps a day, 100,000 steps a week, and I can see if I am short at any time. It is easy to convince yourself you have done more walking than you really have.

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It seems to be pretty hit or miss, people either really like them or just don't get into it.

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Buy cheap, buy twice!

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http://getforge.com/ - a superfast static web hosting service. Some clever tech, a bunch of users, very little support and brings in money. It's a nice project, but its success is more important than our owning it. Someone else will be able to do more with it than us :)

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Your site came as inspiration to us on a project we're working on. I'd like to learn more about it. ryan at skycatchfire dotcom

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Do you have an email to contact you ? Didn't find any in your profile.

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Didn't Dustin submit a driver's license?

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I'd love to know how well this works. I always assumed the pan and tilt setup would be too slow for the Rift.

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The video latency is low enough that you don't notice. We tried with moving our hand in front of it, it feels weird too see yourself real-time!

The rotations of the cameras are a bit too slow though, but mainly because of our setup, so this can be a lot better. Our custom protocol couldn't really handle dropped packets, so if we filled the sender's or receiver's buffers, the servos would start to spasm. To counter that we just didn't send head position as often as we could.

Of course, by fixing that you still get the round-trip time of turning your head -> moving the cameras -> getting updated image back. But we think it's feasible.

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I do a bit of FPV myself so I know what you mean about the real-time! The round-trip is what I meant - especially with all the work to get the latency down on the Rift.

I've always thought fixed, super-wide-angle lenses and software would be the ideal way to go - the groundstation does all the work.

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Yeah, it's been suggested to us a few times after people have seen the project. Someone should definitely explore that way as well.

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Any plans to use a brushless gimbal? It would be way faster and smoother, and I bet the latency would be imperceptible.

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Any reason you didn't just transmit 3 normal RC PWM channels? You could do all the custom circuitry on the ground. Plug the Oculus into a microprocessor, then output to the trainer port of an RC transmitter or perhaps use one of the standard RC transmitter modules like JR or Futaba.

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As I said in my top level comment, it was a project at the university. So the reason is basically that we were making a prototype the best way we could, in a way we knew we could finish in time. :)

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I read your PDF. I haven't done anything along these lines, I just thought all the USB transmission and decoding sounded way more difficult than using standard RC transmission.

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Well, as a programmer I knew that domain. As the saying goes, when you're a hammer.. :)

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How does a weekend hobby project (and one that's been done before no-less) become a university research project?

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It's not exactly a "university research" project. We're just students. It's a course where there is much focus on combining the expertise of different studies and focus on teamwork. So it's more about the process and widening your engineering focus.

And the video is made for showoff, the project in itself is about the applications of a system like this in a specific industry.

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Fair enough - you could probably make that clearer in the write-up...

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i assumed it must use a 360 camera but i was wrong. i don't know much about quadcopters but it seems like a decent idea to me

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Quick to call someone stupid, aren't we? Did you even try his code? Go try it. Just because a site doesn't have jQuery, doesn't mean $ isn't assigned to anything.

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Pretty sure cturhan did try jffry's code and that's why he wrote this code. The $ var on the page only returns the first instance that it matches so his code doesn't work.

A less efficient but shorter way is:

    var interval = setInterval(function(){
    	var links = document.querySelectorAll('#problems a');
    	for(var z =0; z< links.length; z++) {
    		$('#'+links[z].id).click();
    	}
    }, 1000);

Also he never called him stupid he simply informed him that it didn't work.

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You're right, sorry - it was the supercilious tone I objected to. In fact $() returns the first element and clicks it. Because it's in a setInterval, it continues to click the first <a> it finds every 100ms. Did you try it?

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Actually the oneliner does work. (Although it throws error when a is not found.)

A quick fix would be setInterval(function(){ $("a") && $("a").click() }, 100)

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I'm with sleepyhead - what exactly is wrong with Safari? I'm a web developer and I use Safari almost exclusively. Hardware-accelerated (on OSX, anyway), good performance, accurate rendering, no privacy intrusions.

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Does it run on Linux? Or Windows for starters?

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http://support.apple.com/kb/dl1531

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No, it currently ships only on iOS and OSX.

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That was kinda the point. It has no presence outside of Apple products. Even Opera uses Blink as base.

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Why is it a problem that you cannot use Safari on other platforms? The web was made to be used from many clients. I don't see the problem here.

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Safari's a joke. Only runs on mac, ships support for key platform features late (and ships subpar support when it comes to things like video/audio codecs), and delivers slower performance.

I respect the JSC team a lot but Safari is an active hindrance to anyone trying to ship HTML5 games. It's just a poor-quality browser.

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Safari is fantastic.

It sounds like you are coming from a web development direction, and are frustrated that Safari doesn't support the web APIs that you care about. As a software engineer, I can sympathize with that.

But as a user, I prefer Safari, because I find that it prioritizes user experience over fidelity to the web page. Examples:

1. Safari was one of the first browsers to ship with a popup blocker

2. Safari defaults to blocking third party cookies

3. Safari Reader cuts out distracting ads and other crap, improving nearly every article. I click it whenever I can.

4. Safari Power Saver defeats annoying animations while saving battery life

I love that Apple is able to deliver features like these, because their fortunes are not tied to advertising.

I also strongly dispute that Safari is slower. For example, I visited cnn.com with Safari and Chrome, and attempted to scroll while the page loads. Safari scrolls responsively, while Chrome and Firefox stutter until the page finishes loading. Things like scrolling performance have a much bigger impact on how my browser feels than any JavaScript benchmark.

It's true that some websites don't work well in Safari, especially HTML5 games. For pages where I want to see that stuff in action, I'll switch to Chrome. But frankly, most web pages are made more usable by disabling newer features. Chrome then becomes a poor man's opt-in.

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> 1. Safari was one of the first browsers to ship with a popup blocker

Opera was shipping an enabled-by-default popup blocker before Safari's first public beta, and I'm not even sure if it was first.

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Scroll latency has nothing to do with performance. You can achieve low scroll latency by doing scrolling and composition on a worker thread - which, IIRC, is more or less what OS X and iOS do, and is something Safari can take advantage of freely because it's not portable.

If memory serves, recent builds of Firefox (on the non-release channels) are actually starting to roll out OMTC (off main thread compositing) which delivers the same sort of 'performance' you like about Safari, while keeping the perks of Firefox having a faster parser, faster JS runtime, and modern feature set.

You are generally correct that latency is important, though. I don't know if the Chrome dev team prioritizes it much, but Mozilla recently started putting more effort into measuring and reducing latency in various parts of the browser (inattention had let latencies get pretty bad in some places.)

Safari's fortunes aren't tied to advertising because Apple already extracted a payment for every user that runs Safari. They're free to do those things like disable cookies and bundle an ad blocker because they don't have to consider the desires of content creators or generate a revenue stream via their browser. It's the same set of tactics Microsoft was free to use with IE. It's impossible for Firefox or Chrome to offer similar features without directly undermining their revenue sources.

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Scroll latency has a lot to do with "perceived performance" and that's the only measure a user cares for - Chrome might be 1000x faster for SunSpider / whatnot benchmark but if it stutters and stalls when scrolling a page, users will consider it slower.

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If in one browser an asm.js compiled Unreal Engine 4 game loads in 5 seconds, and in Safari it loads in 2 minutes, you better believe users will notice. JS performance matters.

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Yes, they'd notice that. But how often does that scenario (running Unreal Engine 4 under asm.js) happen, would you say, on a day to day basis? Compared with trying to scroll a loading webpage, I mean. We're probably talking orders of magnitude difference, I suspect.

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> I also strongly dispute that Safari is slower.

I use Safari as my main browser for the reasons you mention, but it is slower. It just feels like a cumbersome dinosaur compared to FF or Chrome. And the navigating back flow is less than desirable. I find myself navigating too often to a blank page, or it just seems like Safari doesn't know what to do.

Basically, it does everything great except for the actual browsing part.

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The issue is the example being set. Trappy is definitely one of the best, but his videos don't demonstrate his hours of experience, or safety considerations, to a novice pilot. The affordability of the machine plus some examples of fancy flying are sure to put dangerous machines in the hands of idiots, and that's best avoided. Remember - these things fly out of the box with no training.

Trappy also has access to many more multicopter spares than the rest of us. This may have something to do with his reckless flying!

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Agreed.

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> Render it server side, cache it, and fire it to my browser as fast as possible.

Shameless plug, but we've been trying to do something similar with Forge (getforge.com). We built a Javascript library called TurboJS that precompiles a static HTML build into a JS manifest and loads it all. It's SEO-friendly and super-fast. Our other site, http://hammerformac.com/ uses it, for example.

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Precompiling static HTML is a strict sub-problem of the problem most people in this comment thread are referring to, which is development incentives and SEO characteristics for web pages that have non-trivial amounts of dynamic content.

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