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One of my favourite speedruns, Portal Done Pro: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W1U5RUVENNE

Gets interesting at 3 mins. There's also an explanatory series.

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This is just badass. He also did Portal 2 IIRC.

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Agreed, they're simple to use, even the 2 lane varieties.

I think the problem is as mentioned, often American ones are much different. It seems more like a free for all circle with a random bunch of roads exiting and entering, with no lanes marked. Also construction obscured the view to the left.

I did come across a few "normal" roundabouts at least, but they either don't exist or are terrible.

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Maybe Valve have finished HL3, and are releasing a bunch of things to try out (F2P economy, marketplaces, trading cards, community upgrades, steambox), then if any have heavy backlash, they can just say "Shh guys, here's HL3".

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This might be useful for contracts, as well. Editing points and having history, being able to comment on specific parts etc.

Not 100% sure on how to solve the "legally binding" part if the other party declines digital signatures, but it'd be a good way to get the contract written and agreed on.

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How much savings did you have? I'm considering doing the same at some point, though my quick glance at index funds makes it seem like I'd get basically nothing. What sort of budget does this afford you?

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Vangaurd low cost index funds. Supposedly, you can count on 8-10% annual return. I also did/do some occasional stock picking which has gotten good results (but I wouldn't count on that being sustainable). I probably spend about 20k a year, and have savings in the low 6 digits.

I waited until I had 5-10x my annual expenses, but obviously you can do it with less. My main recommendation would to be have at least an extra 6 months of living expenses beyond what you need (so if you are taking a year off, have at least 1.5 yrs of living expenses) in case it takes a while to find work again. The main advantage of saving more than that is you can use the returns from your investments to offset some of your costs a bit.

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You can also count on index funds to lose 50% of their value in two years in an upcoming crisis. The roaring 90s and mid 2000s isn't a pattern that will continue to repeat itself. The fed can't keep printing the S&P500 up forever.

I think made a great decision, but you ought to diversify your nest egg.

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I agree that there is some risk, but I am not sure how I would be able to diversify any more than I already have. I have my money split into about 6 different index funds, primarily diversified globally, although I have a few industry/sector specific funds. And then I have about 30% of my savings in stocks that I picked, most of which are pretty stable companies with fairly long term future/outlook (so they would, in theory, come out of a recession in good shape, even if they took a few hits).

If there is some other asset class I am missing, let me know. In the meantime, I think I will take my chances with the market. Worst case, if things get bad, I can just go back to work (left my old company, in a fairly recession proof industry, on good terms)

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Same with me as well, I am doing some work in Forex, but that is proving incredibly difficult. As that is live intraday training.

I usually work a contract job for my University but I get my money in lump sums, so I was thinking I could put a sum into some sort of index fund, or even a currency fund.

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My least favourite are product titles that are completely unrelated to the use (which is fine), but when titles are modified, it becomes completely pointless:

"Goose - A JS library for 3D graphics" --> "Goose"

Yeah thanks guys.

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Can I emphasize the use of code samples right on the homepage?

As an example, Requests (http://docs.python-requests.org/en/latest/). If you've ever done URL fetching in Python you can immediately see the value and cleanliness of it.

A couple of projects I've come across don't have anything like it, and only have more of an API reference. I understand it may be early days and documentation hasn't yet been a priority, but I really love to see the advantages of the library, particularly if you compare it to the old way of doing things.

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If it helps, this type of problem has come up precisely zero times ever. Use a built in function, loop through the array, and if in the future it's running slow, _then_ optimise

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You don't need to optimize prematurely, but you should understand when/why/how to optimize something like this off the top of your head if you ever want to work at a company that deals with non-trivial amounts of data. If that's the hardest question I got asked at an interview, I'd never take the job.

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Hi. I wrote the post. I'm releasing a free ebook next Tuesday where hopefully I can change your mind. (I also wrote The Little Redis Book and The Little MongoDB Book, so hopefully you'll give me a chance!)

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How nice of you to share! Thank you Mr. latch (:

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Yeah in my experience "going responsive" is only one step. I did this for http://rugbydump.com (partly still in progress).

There's a lot of `if (IS_MOBILE)` around the place, to not download a large amount of extra stuff on mobiles.

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That's good. I think people look at responsive sites as that's all they need to do and for the most part I haven't come across many discussions about taking it further.

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Try out fabric, start really, really, really small.

I'll assume you use Git (if not, replace with your workflow). A super simple fabric script might simply be a `git push`. Instead of typing "git push origin master" in order to push to github/bitbucket/wherever, you'd run "fab deploy". Not going to go into the fabric specifics, but deploy() would pretty much just call git push.

Anyway, that may have confused you even more. My point is, start with something incredibly simple. After you've added git push, you can add to your fabfile.py to ssh into the server, and run git pull. Then add in something to run south migrations. Then collectstatic. Eventually you'll build to something that you can simply run, and everything will be updated and all good.

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