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or he could go get a competing offer with a 50% raise ;)

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Python Sudoku Solver by Peter Norvig -- an elegant solution in one page of code. When I read this, I felt like code is art.

http://norvig.com/sudoku.html

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Tangential, but entertaining, is the TDD Sudoku http://devgrind.com/2007/04/25/how-to-not-solve-a-sudoku/

As Ravi said:

Ron Jeffries attempts to create a sudoku solver – here, here, here, here and here. (You really ought to read these articles. They are ummm…{cough} …err…. enlightening.)

Peter Norvig creates a Sudoku Solver.

Compare. Learn.

http://ravimohan.blogspot.se/2007/04/learning-from-sudoku-so...

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"Carlos Bueno, an Engineer at Facebook, doesn't let data push him around."

Hilarious!

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Interesting that in a non-antibiotic environment, the antibiotic resistant bacteria are actually less fit because that resistance comes at a cost.

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This is why you don't do an interview with Forbes and thumb your nose at the FBI when you're running an illegal operation. When I saw that interview, I knew his days were numbered.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2013/08/14/an-inte...

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By the time that interview was posted in August, the FBI had already imaged the SR server (in July).

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From the Forbes article: "So this was not merely a distributed denial of service attack? It was a zero day exploit? Did it gain access to any data or simply knock the site offline?

I’m not one hundred percent on this, but I don’t think it’s possible to do a DDoS over Tor, or at least it is much harder than doing it over the clear net. The effect of the attack was to block access to Silk Road. No data was leaked, in fact we’ve never had a data leak. "

Posted after the feds imaged the server. OOOPS. Hubris is dangerous.

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If the guy had never talked to the press at all... you think the FBI and DEA would have just ignored a massive drug marketplace running essentially out in the open?

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I think the point here is that, even though the letter agencies would not have ignored it... they surely got a lot more "incentives" internally to focus on SR when it got more mainstream attention. More analysts, more easily approved wiretapping/surveillance actions (not that they need approvals of any kind nowadays), essentially more money into it.

People slip, it's inevitable. How fast that happens probably got accelerated by SR's owner appearances and the dent it was making in the agencies' reputation.

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This is like saying nana nana boo boo stick your head in doo doo. You can't run an illegal business and then vehemently flaunt it to a major news publication that gets read around the world essentially saying that your smarter than the government won't end well for anyone.

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I'm going to assume the FBI (or DEA) were going after Silk Road, interview or not.

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Rather, the type of person who was willing to engage in illegal activities while also doing a high-profile interview was unlikely to be the sort of person who was paranoid enough to cover their tracks (e.g., avoid re-using handles and other identifying information).

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Whoa! This thread suddenly got a lot more interesting.

I'm excited to see how this plays out. At the very least it should filter out a lot of noise.

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I love these types of stories on HN... wish we had more of them.

(And look, no snark in the comments!)

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Music video for Thrift Shop. Enjoy. :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QK8mJJJvaes

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"I don't use a desk. I work in five or six different places and postures around the house. When the weather's good, I'm outside, or on the porch. My preferred "desktop background" is some interesting view in back of my netbook's rather small screen."

This is such a liberating setup. I'm rethinking my need for a home office now.

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> This is such a liberating setup.

Yeah, it's "liberating" until you develop chronic back and shoulder pain later in life.

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Observing your body and changing positions whenever they become uncomfortable is far better for your long-term health than is a well-engineered chair.

I now rotate between a standing desk, a normal desk, a couch (only when reading/exploring - typing here is tougher), and the floor, and all of my back problems have disappeared.

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Pilates is great for developing that sense of individual muscle fatigue and for strengthening the muscles that will hold you in proper form.

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To each his own, I suppose. I've been deskless for 4 years, mostly on a couch in a relaxed position with laptop on my, hmm, laps. It's much more comfortable for me than chairs and desks. I sometimes spend 16 hours per day pressing those keys; I don't think I could've survived that in a chair behind a desk.

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You still need to be careful: 4 years is not that long. Middle Ages people were exposed to very harsh environments and still lived to 30.

I started getting neck pains after 11 years into my programming career. I attribute it mostly to programming on a sofa with a laptop -- in this position you constantly look a bit down (if a laptop is on your lap) and your neck will not like it.

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I'd wager that it's more healthy than most home offices, which tend to restrict you to one position.

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You should just give it a go. It might work well for you.

It was a total failure for me because I found I needed the psychological aspect of going to an office and sitting at a desk to shift into "work mode." (The anecdotal 'proof' being a 2x jump in income between these two settings.) But we're all different.. luckily :-)

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Have you tried the "Auto Pager" Chrome extension? It's pretty handy...

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