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My own experience says the article is probably true. I've worked with lots of good developers, very view have had a CompSci degree (I do, but still), and a good number of people with a CompSci degree have been crap.

But, the vast majority of those people did have a degree (EE, ME, CE, English, Forestry, General Studies, Business, Music, Art, etc). The degree does help you, especially when interviewing. It can also make it easier to transition from a straight coder to management (and other promotions/job changes). Not because the degree grants you new wisdom, but because it helps ease the minds of those doing the promotions.

Now, that said, there are a number of things I learned as part of my degree that I probably would not have otherwise (or as well), like compilers and operating systems. But those are largely "nice to have"s, and not required to do actual work.

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My father-in-law and one of my daughters are both mumblers. But my father needs hearing aids.

Best way to make sure father-in-law speaks up is to have my father around.

Downside is it physically wears my father-in-law out. He just can't handle expending that much effort into speaking.

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The worry of a lot of us is that the cheapest and easiest way to comply is to remove the content. Once gone the problem is solved. That may not be the intent, but if I were in the universities shoes that is EXACTLY what I would do. Even worse if I have to pay lawyers and transcribers.

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And ongoing costs for a new ADA compliance office, and the red tape everyone in the community will have to wade through with that office to publish an officially vetted video.

This will have a severe chilling effect on such productions, above and beyond the not trivial costs of getting high quality captions, which for technical material---which includes plenty of specialized humanities stuff, not just math, physics, etc.---is particularly expensive.

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In the grand scheme of things I'd probably liken it to disability ramps, braille on room signage, etc. It'll probably add a few points to the total cost, but in the grand scheme we're talking about 3-5%, not 30-50% in additional costs. What'll probably happen is that each prof will need to assign a TA to basically deal with it. (Remember, these specialized technical costs are particularly cheap for universities.)

I unfortunately don't have a lot of insight on the case itself, but I surmise the reason why these activist lawyers are going after Harvard and MIT is because they have plenty of resources to solve these issues. Part of being a leading academic institution is to "do the right thing", and at this juncture it's up to highly specialized legal people to figure out what that means.

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Almost all TAs would take forever to caption video and would do a bad job. TAs don't grow on trees and transcribing captions for all the lectures would use up their full 20hrs/week. A lot of the cited videos in the suit are not of course lectures but from events on campus. Good commercial transcription service costs about ~$150/hour with markups for difficult video (bad audio quality, accents, obscure subject vocabulary) but an institution doing a lot of business will get a discount.

An advantage of bringing the suit is it brings in the federal government as "referee." The advocates have their ideas about what "the right thing" is and Harvard administrators and lawyers will have their own but the feds will basically create regulation for how these long-standing laws should be applied in these cases. They might say that certain kinds of content should be captioned as a matter of course but that others can be left uncaptioned until an individual requests it, the analogy being that the school doesn't have to have an ASL interpreter at every on-campus event, just at the ones where one is requested.

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I'm also a farm kid. I think the problem is defining what is a small farm vs a large farm. And that definition will change depending one what part of the country you are in. A small dairy by me is anything less than 1000 milking head of cows. A small farm is less than 1500 acres (5000 acres is common). In a different region, 300 milking head is large, so is 500 acres of farm ground.

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5,000 acres is common? Are there family farms that are that large, or are those corporate farms. I've never heard of a family farm that was 8 sections large - so presumably these are corporate farms?

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My grandparents own 5000 acres, of which they used to farm around 3000 acres of that actively. And we managed all of that with my grandfather, a hired hand, and myself in the summer, and just my grandfather and the hired hand during the winter. We did a 2000 acre wheat harvest, and 4 cuttings of hay at a 1000 acres a cutting in the summer from June through September.

I worked 12 hour days during the summer from the time I was 12 until I was 17.

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>And we managed all of that with my grandfather, a hired hand, and myself in the summer, and just my grandfather and the hired hand during the winter.

well, i see one more time how USSR planned collective economy sucked compare to the US farming - a USSR collective farm of 10-20K acres would contain 200-300 households with most working age people of the households employed at the farm.

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Then you understand nothing of how URSS actually worked. They didn't "employed" 300 people because they were needed, they did so to keep everyone busy. The head of a "colhoz" (I think that would roughly translate to "farm"), sometimes had to make up stuff, just keep people busy, and write the hours on paper.

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>Then you understand nothing of how URSS actually worked.

i was born in 72 in USSR. Roughly half my family, like grandmother & grandfather, 2 uncles and an aunt lived in a "kolhoz" and "sovhoz" near by. We visited frequently and i spent some summers there. I also worked at a "sovhoz" the summer after 6th grade. There wasn't making up of the stuff. There were a lot of inefficiencies, low productivity - manual labor instead of machines - and bad organization - typical slice of USSR economy.

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>I worked 12 hour days during the summer from the time I was 12 until I was 17.

Wow, honestly just reading that just blew my mind. Do you think that made you a better person or helped you at all down the road? That is a ton of manual labor for anyone, especially a child.

I know that this used to be common practice back before the industrial revolution but I guess I never really thought about it, or heard of anyone who actually went through something like that.

Serious question, no disrespect meant.

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I feel that it did help me. I have a work ethic that is not really found in a lot of people even at my age(30). I still love to work outside, and enjoy a good hard days labor. It has allowed me to get ahead in the IT field because I am willing to work 12 - 16 hour days, without even blinking, because to be honest, a 16 hour day in a really comfortable chair with music is pretty easy compared to a 12 hour day of bucking hale bales when it is 100F outside.

And to be honest I don't feel that it in anyway hurt nor hindered me either. I grew up just as healthy, and probably stronger then most of my peers. And still don't feel that I was abused in anyway, not to mention all through highschool I was making 2 - 3k a year in income because of that work.

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Not the GP but I did the same. Longer hours sometimes - make hay while the sun shines and all that (where I grew up in NZ we have a good 14 hours of sun to make the most of). I was on the market gardens, so planting, hoeing, picking, shifting irrigation pipes around etc. In the winter every Sunday was a 7:30am start picking cauliflower. When you grow up in that environment, it's just normal.

Though, it's really not uncommon. I picked apples for a season and most people worked all the hours they possibly could, because they had to (me included).

An interesting moment of mis-calibration that I'll never forget; At one point I was picking apples near the roadside and a man driving by stopped to ask me a question. He said, "How much do they pay you?" to which I replied $15. And he said, "For one of those?" pointing to the bag around my neck [0]. Slightly astounded I replied, "No, for one of those!" pointing to the large wooden bin on the ground [1].

It's a moment that will stick with me forever as a stark realisation that most people are totally disconnected from the manual labour that goes into the production of the things they consume every day (I know that applies to a lot more that just fruit and veg, and we're all guilty of it). I remember thinking at the time how unjust it was that once I made enough money to travel back to the city, I'd be earning a magnitude more sitting in an office in front of a computer.

I think if nothing else you develop a strong work ethic. Probably to a fault; over the years I've had to learn not to look so critically on those that don't put in as much work as I do. At the same time, I notice and admire those that have the same work ethic as me.

All in all I think it's a positive experience that's helped me along the way to be good at what I do now (tech startup). I think it's become part of my core character and I feel a certain sense of pride at how hard I worked when I was younger (and still do).

[0] http://cmsimg.delawareonline.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=B...

[1] http://www.applebarn.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/IMAG1310...

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FWIW, in NSW Australia, the average land size of farms is just over 3,300ha.

Heavens knows the average size in Australia - the biggest station is 2,366,700ha. I guess it probably needs to be defined by the sort of farming being done.

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By farming, I'm referring to land which is planted/harvested, typically row crops like Wheat, Corn (maize), or hay (alfalfa). From doing a bit of reading on things like http://talk.newagtalk.com/forums/thread-view.asp?tid=5707&Di..., I'm guessing the practical limit is the speed/capability of a combine, and the length of the harvest season. It sounds like 100 acres/day is a limit, and harvest season can (typically) stretch from mid-september to end of october - or around 45 days. So, full out, presuming you use your own equipment, the largest "family" farm that can sustain a single annual harvest would be around 4500 acres.

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Would owning multiple combines disqualify you from being considered a "family farm"?

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Also - can you be considered a family farm if you don't own a combine, but instead hire the services of one/several?

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House burns down/cave collapses -- all pictures gone. Which is how most people run anyway.

Personally, I'm using Amazon Cloud Drive for storing pictures.

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Backup software that locally encrypts data before sending it off to a remote location helps with that problem. I use Arq to backup my photos to S3, but I would feel comfortable to just store all photos unencrypted in iCloud.

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I just discovered yesterday that I seem to have lost lots of Arq backups. I downgraded from Yosemite to Mavericks and the only backups Arq shows me are from after the downgrade.

I'll dive into this this weekend, I _really_ hope I didn't lose the actual files, just the indexes.

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Although I haven't implemented it yet, the full plan would be to store the external drive off-site. Granted, that's a much larger inconvenience.

Of course cloud storage provides more convenient redundancy, but would it be completely safe to rely on it 100%? Is there no scenario under which Apple or Amazon could end up contacting you to say "Sorry, we lost your data and cannot recover it"? It is very unlikely, but so is your house burning down.

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I can't speak to Apple, but I know for a fact that AWS' claimed 11 nines SLA (99.999999999%) for S3 is purely theoretical - in practice, they've never lost an object yet.

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I've read differently...

> Yes. On 12-21-12 Amazon notified us that 4 of our files (out of hundreds of millions) were lost due to a bug encountered while performing some sort of migration. 2 are gone forever and 2 are truncated forever. I've been using S3 for several years at Mixbook and Smule before that--this is the first loss I've experienced.

http://www.quora.com/Has-Amazon-S3-ever-lost-data-permanentl...

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Fair point, but it only takes 1 failure for a catastrophe. I suppose my question would be: is cloud-storage alone enough?

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Untrue, S3 does (extremely rarely) lose objects.

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Same here, we have a dozen coops, and homeschool groups everywhere. Plus we are in a techi area, so occasionally my wife comes back from an outing, telling me about this new family she just met...turns out I know the dad as he is a programmer in the area.

As for single parent homeschooling...I can't even imagine. Homeschooling is my wife's job, that is what we call it. Anything less is a disservice to the kids.

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I'm with you on that. I seriously hate the term "creatives", I've only seen it used in a derogatory way (either by or against). I just can't take anyone seriously when they use that word to describe themselves or their clients.

Could also be a trigger for me, I word with a lot of designers, artists, and videos guys/gals. Most are pretty good, but all the ones that call themselves "a creative" are guaranteed to be pretty elitist about it.

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What would be a better word? "Creative professionals" comes to mind, but then that seems to exclude hobbyists, who could still derive a lot of value from a program like this.

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Designers design. Artists create art.

Almost every job requires creativity.

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I have fairly large hands and long fingers, I've actually considered the iPhone 6 because of this. The normal iPhone always felt too small for me. I also have trouble finding gloves that fit right, the fingers are just too short.

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I've been running on a Mac for the last 2 years, after 20'ish years of Windows work. At this point I'm 50/50. There are things I HATE about both system.

* Window management in OSX is a complete joke (docking and sizing), I've lost all faith that Apple will ever get that right. * The shell and terminal support is better in OSX (yes, powershell is there, but not by default, and the standard DOS shell sucks) * I have to reboot both systems once a month to keep them working. Others disagree here, but I find OSX no more stable than Windows. * OSX Sound Drivers (WTF! -- I constantly lose sound support on my MacBook Pro) * Microsoft is much faster at fixing issues than Apple (I have a bunch of long standing OSX bugs that span multiple versions, and a couple of new ones with the current release) * I no longer feel the love for Apple hardware. Every iteration is made harder to upgrade than the last. * The Apple App Store is so much better than Microsoft's Store. * Safari is IE: they are both browsers you should only use to download a better browser.

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>Safari is IE: they are both browsers you should only use to download a better browser.

Safari's great for battery life. I've switched from Chrome for that reason. Judging from the system-wide beachballs and frequent fan spin-ups for no obvious reason back when I used Firefox, I assume it would be even worse than Chrome.

Its developer tools aren't that different from Chrome's, either, and it's got a decent selection of plugins. I have Chrome installed and occasionally use it, but close it ASAP.

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I keep forgetting to enable that feature!

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