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~/Dropbox/ideas.txt adding new entries at the top of the file. I wonder how many thousand ideas.txt files are on Dropbox servers :)

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That sucks.

What also sucks is being asked for money to change name servers only:

  .gr: £46.64 (74 USD)
  .cz: £14.57
  .dk: £24.29
  .hu: £17.49
  .ro: £17.49

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for the .ro (Romania) domains this is not really true. the national domain registrar (rotld.ro) doesn't charge anything for updating name servers. probably the additional fees you're talking about are imposed by some third-party / reseller.

what I also found interesting or at least peculiar is that the Romanian registrar charges a one-time only fee for registering a domain and it has been doing so for as long as I know. you pay 50 Euros per domain but you get to keep it for your whole life or as long as they don't decide to charge on a yearly basis. I'm curious if there's any other domain provider offering lifetime registration?

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That must have changed?

http://nic.ro/payments/

looks like 17 Euro/yr with breaks on longer terms

EDIT: I went to the English site tho, not rotld.ro - perhaps residents only get the better deal?

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.dk danish domains is free. Where do you get that price from?

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Those are charges of eurodns; I called them and they said that they're just passing on me what the registrar charge them.

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EuroDNS is a registrar. Are you sure you are not mixing registry and registrar ?

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Could you please provide the source of this information? As far as I know it is not true at least for .cz domains.

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I spent quite a bit of time on AppLens, an icon matching app for iOS (take a photo of an icon --> download the app).

The backend (in C) is pretty fast and stable (current uptime 384 days) and it can be used for other types of images (i.e. not icons but photos, covers, etc.).

App Store link: http://bit.ly/Szmy7X

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I stumbled over it few months ago and the issue was that readdir(), used by rm on the box I was using, by default alloc'd a small buffer (the usual 4KB) and with millions of files that turned in millions of syscalls (that's just to find out the files to delete).

A small program using getdents() with a large buffer (5MB or so) speeds it up a lot.

If you want to be kind to your hard drive then sorting the buffer by inode before running unlink()s will be better to access the disk semi-sequentially (less head jumps).

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I made AppLens (formely AppSnap) a iphone app that lets you install any other iphone app by taking a picture of its icon (on other phones or laptop screens or anything else).

It's a free app + ads, most of its users are from china and japan.

Money-wise definitely not an hit!

I spent quite a bit on time to develop the backend part (in C) and optimized it to query 3mil icons in few ms on a commodity server (cheap).

http://bit.ly/Szmy7X

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Cool idea, liked it! Can you give some hints about the image processing you have done or what kind of trick did you use?

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This is incredibly awesome.

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Thanks!! :)

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They don't like scrapers, they don't even allow links to their website without permission.

From their TOS:

"5. Links to this website. You may not establish and/or operate links to this website without the prior written consent of Ryanair."

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Well, looks like HN is about to be sued into the ground. It was nice hanging out with you fine folks.

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That's fairly standard legalese for large companies. I'm not saying it makes any sense, I'm just saying I've seen it a lot. I believe this is an attempt to lay some groundwork to support the removal of links from sites that you don't want any corporate association with.

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Hopefully pg will remove the link, so HN isn't associated with Ryanair. ;-)

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The entire web is based off linking. If they don't want linking, then they shouldn't use HTML and HTTP. "HT" stands for Hypertext https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypertext

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If you do link to their site, what can they do? Redirect to 404 or home page for external links?

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Sue you?

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A good designer can score on the Appstore even if he is a novice programmer.

Unfortunately that's not true for good programmers that suck at design.

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Maybe. Though Apple gives you a lot of tools to help you make good (though simple) looking applications. UIKit is pretty detailed.

Here is my simple design advice if you don't know how to design:

* Use the provided UI elements, they look great.

* Choose a primary color and an accent color, don't get carried away.

* Make sure everything lines up. Choose a number (10 pts) and align everything off of that. Aligning your UI elements will go a very long ways to make everything look good.

* If you have paragraphs of text set the line height to around 1.5 (depending on the font).

* The only thing provided by Apple that is Ugly is the UIButtons. Draw a simple, clean button or ask someone to make one for you.

If you follow these simple ideas you can make a pretty good looking application without knowing how to design.

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Also, a programmer who can't design is able to release an ugly, but functional application. A designer who can't program will only make a beautiful but useless design. In this case I think the programmer has the advantage.

Though my philosophy is to learn both.

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> Though my philosophy is to learn both.

How many of your friends are designers or artists?

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I have a couple friends who are designers. But many more who are programmers.

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This is true everywhere, not just the app store.

A well-designed, but poorly coded site is going to do a lot better (generally), than a well coded, but poorly designed site.

This is why I'm trying so hard to level my design skills.

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This is why, as a developer, I married a designer.

Ok, that's not the only reason why, but it's worked out really well.

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Now that is a clever idea.

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Very true. I think that it is because of the form factor (small screen, full touch) that design is essential. Fortunately there are some great designers out there for programmers to hire. I've had my most success with iOS apps where I hired a designer (I'm a programmer).

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I think google is working to move Android to Go as soon as possible; Rob Pike replied to a related question with "I cannot talk about it" and that sounds like a good clue :)

Go binaries already run on Android/ARM, the higher level code is the one that's missing.

That would bring great boost in performance (compilers are available for both x86 and ARM) without adding any complexity on the language side (Go is a cool language).

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Just went to Google to see if I could find anything relating to this possibility, and was immediately reminded how annoying it is, with respect to search, that they named the language "Go".

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They managed to optimize their golang.org homepage to get the position #5 on the word "go".

They must be good at SEO.

BTW the video I mentioned is at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-i0hat7pdpk&feature=playe...

(at the end during Q&A)

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Well, they own the crawler and the index, they will know, what to do...

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It's not that funny any more if you have to explain it ;)

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I think everybody should just call it "golang"

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It helps to include the words "lang" or "language" in the search. Kinda frustrating.

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There is a "Custom Search Engine" for Go: http://go-lang.cat-v.org/go-search

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Interesting. Possibly to skirt the Oracle/Java mess? If so, I think it's a great idea. iOS/Obj-C has shown that devs will use a new (to them) language if need be.

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With Golang on AppEngine, I can see a momentum within Google pushing for Golang for Android. Rob's comment sounds very positive. I'm guessing we will see something at Google IO next year.

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A great resource to read about Fourier transformation and Wavelets

http://users.rowan.edu/~polikar/WAVELETS/WTpart1.html

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Backends seem overpriced to me; their default backend is a long-lasting process running at 1.2Ghz allowed to use 256MB of RAM and it's priced $0.16/hour ($115/month).

They can shutdown/restart/relocate your backend whenever they want so what they suggest to keep your service live is "Configuring more backend instances than are normally required to handle your traffic patterns" (yeah that's at least another $115/month fee).

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At linode that kind of money will give you 4G of ram, cpu power in the same ball park and loads of storage and transfer. It seems that Backends - and the GAE in general - makes most sense when you view the system as a whole, and work with systems of a certain size. Tasks goes in to queues and backends are started and stopped as needed - stuff like that. If all you need is to serve a long running process, linode and the like is more economical.

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If you're actually using them as a backend, I'm not sure you couldn't start them up and shut them down.

But yes, they are expensive.

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