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It may be that connections though xfinitywifi don't count against the neighbors allocated bandwidth and won't degrade their service since their router and connection support more than their allocated bandwidth. Can anyone confirm if this is the case?

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Their solution stops the reloads for each browser and has the benefit of alerting the user that something's wrong, without hammering "somewhere".

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But if users just click OK multiple times it still means more requests (since it was happening every 2secs).

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Who's the steward of your language of choice?

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Languages of choice...but shouldn't matter who it is. Why draw comparisons that will only serve to evoke political and ideological responses? I think that my suspicion of Google's capacity to perform here is warranted and that's really all I have to say about it.

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I like reading a bit of prose about when a tool doesn't fit someone's use case. Nim has a pretty interesting approach to data sharing in concurrency, and it's more interesting to read a story of someone who got bit by it than to read a table of language features and wonder when it might prove to be a problem.

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But that's not how it was phrased at all. It was more like "I liked this thing, then I didn't like it because it didn't scale in a certain aspect as I wanted to so peace". I think studies of use cases are valuable but this was not one.

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Out of curiosity, what tool did you use to sketch the various architectures for your post?

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I used Lucid Charts. It felt easy to work with.

https://www.lucidchart.com/ http://aws.amazon.com/architecture/icons/

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Interesting, I've heard people talk about transhumanism and singularitarianism as similar to religions/cults, but those philosophies aren't usually presented with an explicitly spiritual/religious component. It sounds from the article like the Terasim Movement does try to add a religious component (the profile suggests elements of Judaism). A light skim over the Terasim Movement website (http://www.terasemmovementfoundation.com) doesn't seem to reveal much about that religious component, although this video (http://vimeo.com/100518959) has a nebulously "spiritual" feel to it.

Do you think this cult is dangerous because you believe all cults/religions are, or do you see something particularly worrisome here?

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I think the desire to form an organization which has the purpose of interfering with life at a fundamental level is quite dangerous, particularly since it seems focused around the desires - and thoughts - of a single individual. The creation of alternate-to-nature/-robot life is, arguably, another way to build yourself a slave colony.

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Wow, where did that come from?!? Was starting her workday at 2am everyday part of her "luck"? From this profile, it sounds like she's worked very hard, she's smart, she's sacrificed living on very little as a grad student, she's taken risks, and she's been driven to do work that's important too her (developing technology to save her daughter).

Sure, tons of people live fortunate lives by skating forward on the momentum of a privileged upbringing. But I get exactly the opposite vibe from this article.

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Lots of people work very hard and never make it rich. Working long hours is not a trait unique to very successful people. Therefore, what is unique? Luck.

As far as "living on very little as a grad student", grad students may live on a tight budget but they don't know what poverty means.

I didn't say there was no hard work involved, but the article is not really about the work. It's about these big things that Martine was only able to do because she got very wealthy and very lucky early on.

If you're not already super rich, no amount of hard work is going to let you start a drug company to save your child.

Please don't confuse my dislike for this fawning profile with dislike of Martine. My whole point is that this article nothing but sycophantic fluff, and as a result I don't know Martine at all really. The most insightful thing in this whole article is that she started a weird cult.

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The vast, vast, vast majority of people who are born with every advantage don't accomplish anything worthy of a profile like this. And I don't dispute that, if she'd been born in a starving village in a third-world country (or probably even to poor parents in the US), its very unlikely that that she would have done these particular things.

It seems that the only criteria for interestingness or laudability that you'll accept is to have overcome underprivileged circumstances. I think that's a perfectly fine factor, but I'm personally interested in reading profiles of people for LOTS of other reasons: impressive accomplishments, impressive problem solving, overcoming/motivated by bad things happening to you or your close family, personal struggle, unusual ideas / perspective, hard work, humor, ... and many more (some that I'm not even aware of).

If a person's story has the right weighting of factors like that, I'm interested. And Martine Rothblatt's story was WELL OVER the bar for being someone who I'd want to learn about.

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Most of the things I think are good criteria for admiring someone have nothing at all to do with their bank account. Thanks for missing the point entirely.

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> Thanks for missing the point entirely

Please don't be personally abrasive in Hacker News comments, even when the other person misses a point.

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I'm surprised you were downvoted. I think this suggestion makes a ton of sense. It's certainly the shortest path to having a significantly improved first-party language for Android and Google does have a working relationship with Jetbrains.

I think it's very unlikely that this is in the works since, if it were, you'd expect Google to have thrown significant weight towards kotlin development (https://github.com/JetBrains/kotlin/graphs/contributors).

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I'm not seeing the javascript-alike-ness. What caused that connection to jump out at you?

I see the standard static FP features (from ML, Haskell, Scala, F#) with the syntactic flavor or Rust and some C# tossed in.

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I don't think his point is as broad as you're claiming. He's saying that golang application code is complex due to (for example) lack of generics because the language lacks that complexity.

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