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Is this meant to be how the ChatGPT designers/operators instruct ChatGPT to operate? I guess I shouldn't be surprised if that's the case, but I still find it pretty wild that they would parameterize it by speaking to it so plainly. They even say "please".

> I still find it pretty wild that they would parameterize it by speaking to it so plainly

Not my area of expertise, but they probably fine tuned it so that it can be parametrized this way.

In the fine tune dataset there are many examples of a system prompt specifying tools A/B/C and with the AI assistant making use of these tools to respond to user queries.

Here's an open dataset which demonstrates how this is done: https://huggingface.co/datasets/togethercomputer/glaive-func.... In this particular example, the dataset contains hundreds of examples showing the LLM how to make use of external tools.

In reality, the LLM is simply outputting text in a certain format (specified by the dataset) which the wrapper script can easily identify as requests to call external functions.


If you want to go the stochastic parrot route (which i dont fully biy) then because statistically speaking a request paired with please is more likely to be met, then the same is true for requests passed to a LLM. They really do tend to respond better when you use your manners.

It is a stochastic parrot, and you perfectly explain why saying please helps.

There's a certain logic to it, if I'm understanding how it works correctly. The training data is real interactions online. People tend to be more helpful when they're asked politely. It's no stretch that the model would act similarly.

From my experience with 3.5 I can confirm that saying please or reasoning really helps to get whatever results you want. Especially if you want to manifest 'rules'

That's how prompt injection usually works, isn't it?

Given the number of people who voluntarily submit DNA to ancestry and other analysis sites, it really doesn't have much practical impact if governments collect it. Even without yours, they have enough of your relatives' to identify you. I have the same knee-jerk reaction as everyone else to government encroaching on privacy, but in the end we've all long since voluntarily given up any semblance of privacy. We're all carrying tracking devices and filling our homes with microphones and our families have given away our DNA for us. Privacy doesn't exist.

> Even without yours, they have enough of your relatives' to identify you

This is what makes me mildly irritated about “consent to collect DNA samples.” DNA is not just you, unlike other biometrics, like fingerprints—it’s your relatives too. This makes it hypothetically possible, for example, for some insurer to genetically determine you have a preexisting condition without ever consenting to give your DNA.

Of course this will never get unwound because of the enormous boon to law enforcement these mega gene databases have been.


"I also care, but actually I don't" wow

I expect someday that the entire population's full genomes will be recorded (by some government entity or otherwise) and public. It's sadly only a matter of time.

Except that Viet. gov. isn't really good at putting directive..

During Covid, Vietnam had ~20 official applications to track vaccination and half of them could give travel/move certificate. And to not stop, every city & district did manage differently "inventory" from application, google form, excel over Dropbox to hand managed paper.

To finish, I don't even imaging how it could end; IT security speaking.


This reminded me of power line frequency[1] being used to identify when and where recordings were taken. Governments keep historical records of subtle changes in power frequency and can extract the background hum to identify location and time.

1: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_network_frequency_a...


I wonder if they can do that with gps. Like record a short blip of "unlocked" gps spectrum, then recreate the location offline later using saved ephemerals and other data.

While $120M is a huge amount of money, it doesn't necessarily mean they got a huge percentage return. I don't see how much they staked to get this return. The article does mention that the two wallets are collectively worth $3B, and that they used 1-2x leverage in this bet. I'm curious how much they actually bet on this.

Was it a 10% overnight return? That's a fantastic return, but plenty of traditional market gamblers have pulled that off. Doesn't diminish their success in any way. I'm trying to figure out how much they gained as a percentage of the gambled amount, as the actual dollar amount doesn't mean much.


Yeah, it's interesting that the way Ethereum works make it possible to see exactly how the trade worked and how much it made, but "traders with huge resources made a leveraged bet and won" is something that happens constantly.

In the article, they said they opened the position when Ethereum was 1,000 which was 2021.

That's when they initially started building their now-$3B stake. Doesn't have anything to do with this $120M trade.

This is utterly meaningless. Use an AI to invent something, write down what the AI invented, slap your name on it. Patent. Not only is it unenforceable, it's stupid. Using tools is part of inventing.

This is nothing but political theatre prompted by fear.

I too fear AI, and think it will make us all obsolete in my lifetime, but that doesn't justify meaningless rulings like this.


That's exactly the point. Generative AI systems are tool, not an entity suitable to fulfill the responsibilities of ownership and credit.

It's not fear or theater, it's just a boring and appropriate bureaucratic determination.


The patent can’t be granted to an AI. You can use whatever you want to create an invention you make claim on.

Fair enough, I shouldn't comment before I've had coffee.

You misread it completely.

It's nothing about stopping you from using AI as a tool.


I don't want third-party sellers and especially third-party shippers being prominently displayed. I would hate to accidentally order from one of them. I've ordered from them on purpose before and universally gotten screwed. Broken items, slow shipping, packages that never arrived, missing items from orders marked complete.

I want big flashing warning lights for anything that's not sold and shipped directly by Amazon. At least then it's easy to get remediation when something bad happens.


What a bizarre stance. It's literally easier to https-everything than it is to split your content up between http and https. And there are zero reasons to not use https.

You come off as someone who couldn't figure out how to run certbot.


Hah! This is me. I bought an Arduino and a ton of components and I pretty much stalled out at blinking LED. I also watched all of Ben Eater's YouTube videos on building an 8-bit computer from simple ICs and then bought all the parts to do it and never put it together. I realized that I'd already learned how it worked from the videos, and putting it together would just be rote work that I already knew the outcome of. I tried to think of some practical reason to do it, or some modifications I might make, but then I moved and never unpacked the stuff.


The most powerful thing for me was making sure that I had the relays/etc necessary to safely control 120v circuits.

Then you can make something that can turn off or on "real things" and work from there.

If it can do 120v, it can usually to 12v, and that's the next step - directly controlling components.


What you're forgetting is it absolutely would not work when you first put it together. You would then begin a journey of debugging which would teach you a lot more than any YouTube video ever could.

I can't parse what you wrote to figure out what you were celebrating, but whatever it is, this is my idea of a workplace nightmare. It's bad enough being forced to celebrate someone else's birthday, but it sounds like you're also forcing people to celebrate their own birthdays without their permission, and possibly forcing people to celebrate pregnancies and other personal events without their permission?

I would hate you if I worked with you.


> but it sounds like you're also forcing people to celebrate their own birthdays without their permission

I've taken to telling people I don't have a birthday when asked, unless it's clearly for necessary record keeping; especially in a work context. I get a funny look, but whatever.

If I learn someone else has appropriated my birthday, I do let them know, and we can share private birthday greetings.


That is a lot of emotion and politics. How is it important to you? Is it really about birthdays? Relative to most things, IMHO they are pretty innocuous; YMMV of course.


Kind of harsh without context? I worked for a team that did this - putting your birthday on the spreadsheet was entirely optional, as well as attending any celebratory hallway things. Nobody was forcing anybody to do anything. If you had a conflict or was busy working, or just plain didn't want to participate, everybody understood and wouldn't mind.

FWIW I usually didn't participate nor did I let anybody know my birthday and I never felt excluded.


It's one thing to say "we're celebrating Bob's birthday so there's cake in the kitchen", or "we're going out to lunch for Jill's birthday". You should get Bob and Jill's permission before you do that, but if they're cool with it, then by all means. I can decide for myself if I want to participate, or make a polite excuse not to.

Throwing me a surprise birthday? I hate you. Inviting me to a meeting that I feel obligated to attend, only for it to be a surprise birthday? If it's for someone else, I'll just smile and pretend to enjoy it for the minimum socially-acceptable time and then bow out. If you did that for my birthday I would be pissed off. I'd still smile and pretend to enjoy it, but it would be excruciating torture for me.

And if you ever threw a party for me for anything more personal I wouldn't even smile and pretend, I'd make it publicly known how inappropriate it was.


You seem like a miserable person to be around.

It's cake and a break from work. Even if you hate every single person you work with with a burning passion, it's still cake and a break from work.

I can only understand this opinion if its some kind of forced event after or before work, or worse you're the employer and just want people making you money only. But getting paid to take an extra break and then scolding your coworkers seems a step too far


> It's cake and a break from work.

Actually, it isn't.

Since it's happening during work and between coworkers it's work.

I'd rather do actual work instead of pretending to be glad that coworkers are celebrating my birthday. Actually they aren't. For them "it's cake and a break from work".

So they basically have fun at my expense.

That's exactly why I always take a day off on my birthday. To do what *I* want to do on *MY* birthday.

And the cake part : sure, if you like bad food, don't care about your health and don't have allergies, that's perfect. But that's not everybody's case. Having gone through a weight loss journey during my twenties, work was the only place where I felt pressure from other people to stop my efforts and join them in their trash food orgies.

So I completely understand where @caymanjim's comment is coming from.

I'm probably a miserable person, if you say so.

As a coworker, I'll go out of my way if you ask for help around work or personal issues. But I will never impose on yourself something that is not directly related to our jobs.

You like having a party for your birthday at work? Awesome! If bosses are okay with that, have fun with all the other coworkers that share this same feeling! But don't throw a party for anyone else without asking them their opinion about it first.

If you can't understand that different people have different expectations about basically everything, I can see why you are quick to qualify strangers as miserable.


>But I will never impose on yourself something that is not directly related to our jobs.

I see sentiments like this and understand why we lost the workplace as "the second place" in modern times. Part of it is corporate exhaustion, but others just walk into the ironwall by themselves.

It's half your waking life during biological peak of life. And very few people are working their dream jobs. People can help mitigate the lack of passion in the workplace. It's not my job to maximize the company productivity. I'm not getting any extra pay for working harder.

>If you can't understand that different people have different expectations about basically everything, I can see why you are quick to qualify strangers as miserable.

To be fair, this chain started with an experience and then a dismissive response about a different expectation and experience. It takes two...


> It's not my job to maximize the company productivity.

It literally is.


I'm an IC, so no. I'm given a task or a module of tasks to investigate and solve them based on budget. I may give input, but rarely are the approaches I'm told to take after giving options nor approaches the most optimal nor quality route. Nowhere in the contract does it mention "maximize productivity", nor does it happen in practice.

Even if I was a manager, politics in the office would keep me from hiring the most optimal employee if I can't convince HR or whoever to cough up a bit more money to hire them. Nor would it let the manager relax the load on the most productive workers stuck in meetings so they can work. There's a lot more Theatre among the c class to make things look shiny to investors than there ever is among the workers.

So it's not literally nor figuratively my job. nor even my job de facto. It's not even the C class's job: the most productive is not necessarily the most profitable to begin with.


I understand where you're coming from, but please consider that not everyone is enjoying social situations the same way and to the same extent. For some people, being thrown into a surprise party as its main attraction is quite uncomfortable and outweighs the benefits of "cake and a break from work". It's more like "cake and a very exhausting kind of emotional work" for them.

They might not be much fun at such parties, yes; but telling them that they should enjoy them instead or that they are miserable people seems like a very unkind and unhelpful response to me.


> You seem like a miserable person to be around.

This is outrageously inappropriate. Coworkers who are so willing to be cruel are exactly what makes me uncomfortable in social situations at work. Bullying is always inappropriate. Social interaction at work should be optional and consent should be obtained before revealing personal information. People have different preferences and those preferences should be respected. I can’t believe I even have to say that.

> It's cake and a break from work. Even if you hate every single person you work with with a burning passion, it's still cake and a break from work.

It’s not about hating your coworkers. It’s about social anxiety, professional conduct, and personal liberty. Don’t lie to me about the purpose of a meeting and don’t use my professional time for your personal entertainment. I have a life outside of work. I don’t appreciate wasting working time because I still have to do the work. Don’t interpret my discomfort in forced social situations as a personal insult.

> I can only understand this opinion if its some kind of forced event after or before work, or worse you're the employer and just want people making you money only.

It doesn’t matter what you understand. Your behavior is inappropriate. I doubt it was your intention to hurt anyone so take the feedback, adjust your behavior, and move on.

> But getting paid to take an extra break and then scolding your coworkers seems a step too far

I am paid a salary. The work has to get done. Social interaction isn’t free. I still have to find time to do the work.


I’d prefer, “Hey, I heard it’s your birthday today, why don’t you knock off a couple hours early and go relax. Happy birthday!”


I'll admit this is ideal


Yeah, sounds like someone who never worked in a small team. Probably wouldn't be a great fit anyway.


You're accelerating at 9.8m/s^2 toward your chair right now, so it depends on how comfortable the chair is.


Bold of you to assume I'm not standing on a Uline rubber anti-fatigue mat


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