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ARM | Multiple locations

Care about data structures, algorithms, cache utilization, hardware accelerators, latency & throughput, power consumption, operating systems & virtualization, network protocols & SDN, extensible & robust software, and languages & run-time systems?

Want to work on high performance software for ARM-based server and networking platforms?

We're looking for software engineers who are comfortable digging into complex systems, identifying optimizations, and working with software and hardware teams to implement solutions.

If you want to make an impact in the software and hardware for mega data centers & tier 1 ISPs all the way down to your home router or SBC, we'd like to hear from you.

http://www.arm.com/careers/index.php or contact brooks (dot) brian (at) gmail

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+1

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ARM | Multiple locations

Care about data structures, algorithms, cache utilization, hardware accelerators, latency & throughput, power consumption, operating systems & virtualization, network protocols & SDN, extensible & robust software, and languages & run-time systems?

Want to work on high performance software for ARM-based server and networking platforms?

We're looking for software engineers who are comfortable digging into complex systems, identifying optimizations, and working with software and hardware teams to implement solutions.

If you want to make an impact in the software and hardware for mega data centers & tier 1 ISPs all the way down to your home router or SBC, we'd like to hear from you.

Contact: brooks (dot) brian (at) gmail

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ARM | Multiple locations

Care about data structures, algorithms, cache utilization, hardware accelerators, latency & throughput, power consumption, operating systems & virtualization, network protocols & SDN, extensible & robust software, and languages & run-time systems?

Want to work on high performance software for ARM-based server and networking platforms?

We're looking for software engineers who are comfortable digging into complex systems, identifying optimizations, and working with software and hardware teams to implement solutions.

If you want to make an impact in the software and hardware for mega data centers & tier 1 ISPs all the way down to your home router or SBC, we'd like to hear from you.

Contact: brooks (dot) brian (at) gmail

-----


ARM | Multiple locations

Care about data structures, algorithms, cache utilization, hardware accelerators, latency & throughput, power consumption, operating systems & virtualization, network protocols & SDN, extensible & robust software, and languages & run-time systems?

Want to work on high performance software for ARM-based server and networking platforms?

We're looking for software engineers who are comfortable digging into complex systems, identifying optimizations, and working with software and hardware teams to implement solutions.

If you want to make an impact in the software and hardware for mega data centers & tier 1 ISPs all the way down to your home router or SBC, we'd like to hear from you.

Contact: brooks (dot) brian (at) gmail

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> Go's documentation, tutorials, videos, support, community - what forms the ecosystem, basically - is really the reason why I keep coming back to it.

One way to put it is that this highlights Go from a user's perspective.

The very same thing is true from the compiler developer's perspective.

I've found that the process of installing dependencies, pulling source, navigating source, building, testing, contributing patches, etc is important for success--as well as the user experience.

I've had bug-fix patches accepted into Clang, GHC, and Rust. I found Rust to be a bit pricklier than Clang and GHC. I'd like to make time to get a similar experience with Go--I suspect it would be good.

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Will GYP/GN be deprecated in favor of Bazel?

What, if any, does the convergence among these projects look like longevity-wise?

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tl;dr - Current & next-gen wireless APs saturate 1GbE... 2.5 & 5 Gbps BASE-T (UTP) Ethernet will be the next step.

Hopefully by the time APs reach 10Gbps (at least 3+ yrs?) 10GBASE-T will be more affordable.

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Jaehyun Park's Stanford ACM-ICPC resources:

http://web.stanford.edu/~liszt90/acm/

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Yay! Cmon y'all.. I can't be the only one excited about this!? Where are all the fellow HN'ers who actively practice programming challenges and such? Woot!

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