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Some of us don't live in CA... :)

http://www.irs.gov/uac/Where-To-File-Addresses-for-Tax-Profe...

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Your link is a good resource, since not all forms should go to Fresno, but that office is more than just California. For instance, in Kansas and Missouri, 83(b) elections are sent to the Fresno office. The receiving offices are organized by regions.

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> or you can transfer any amount from Glacier to an EC2 instance in the same region

Note that it's only the transfer that is free. Telling Glacier to retrieve something, even from EC2, comes with all the same fees as if you did it from your own machine.

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Glacier retrievals (separate from data transfers out) can also be effectively free but it can be complex. This complexity is a significant downside to Glacier.

http://aws.amazon.com/glacier/pricing/

http://aws.amazon.com/glacier/faqs/#How_much_data_can_I_retr...

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Maybe in some areas. Here in Austin AT&T, Time Warner and the local ISP Grande are all now offering cheap plans from 300Mbps to full gigabit because Google is coming to town and they need to compete. I pay something around $50 for 300Mbps (no cap) from Time Warner and it works great.

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Wow. Just as another data point to show how monopolies stifle progress, in Cambridge MA I pay $50/mo for 6Mmbps. Comcast is the only Internet company available.

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yep, that's been my experience too. google fiber forced the entrenched providers to become competitive. now, they have become competitive, and I have no clear motivation to switch to google fiber.

I may still switch, but I'm about a half mile away from the "sign up now" zones.

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This is exactly what Google needs - in order for their vision of the future to happen people need to have far better connections on average than they do now. When Google Fiber enters a market, everyone wins - even if you don't switch to Google as your ISP.

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All of the good ones in Austin follow #1.

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I'm a fan of Blacks, moreso than Franklins. Which ones do you recommend?

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Blacks is very good. I also like Opie's in Spicewood (right on the highway). Laird's is good in Llano.

Still haven't been able to get to Franklins - I can't justify taking most of a day off work to go stand in line.

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1) There are regimes that would lock you up (or worse) for looking at some "purely informational" sites.

2) Defaults matter and developers make mistakes. Without required TLS many sites that should be encrypted won't be (they forgot, the site grew into something it didn't used to be, they had no idea what TLS was, etc)

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Ruining the web in order to prevent any possibility of bad things happening is something I'm firmly against. I have several small blogs and websites that I absolutely would not bother with if I had to pay for and set up https on each.

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Here's a tiny twist on WordCount that many, many companies use MR for (often their first foot in the water): you have many gigabytes or terabytes of web access logs and need to bill customers via some API scheme like /api/3001?x=1&y=2 where "3001" there is the customer ID. You add some regex and now you're doing "WordCount" on the customer ID (per day, month, etc).

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That depends, the article mentions Amazon Prime which implies these episodes are free to watch after you have a subscription. If that's true it just means the author is confusing streaming and "cheap subscription services." iTunes is just like buying a DVD except on your computer, so that's not exactly "special."

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http://learnyouahaskell.com/chapters

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You know there are options and this can be easily disabled in seconds, right?

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Why wouldn't you build a newer package for 13.04, or try using the trusty package on it? I can't imagine waiting for a new OS release every time I needed a newer package.

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It is not really often I need a newer package than what is available, I can only think of Beanstalk because if this issue.

I am not really that used to build my own packages, but it is something I want to learn. And I didn't know that I could download from another version, I will look into it, thanks ! :)

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    apt-get build-dep beanstalkd
    apt-get source beanstalkd # or in your case, download the newer source-package
    cd ./beanstalkd-1.x.x
    dpkg-buildpackage -rfakeroot -us -uc
This should do the trick. There are a lot of variations regarding the last line. Just google for Debian packaging or Ubuntu packaging tutorials. It really works well for minor changes. If you need to deploy it to several machines it's also possible to add a custom flag to the package version...

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And it's an unbelievable pain in the ass when they change packaging styles, and the new src packages aren't compatible with the older build tools. IIRC, that happened between 10.04 and 12.04.

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It did, but it's only relevant for packages which actually updated their build scripts. A huge proportion of packages from 12.04 will still build fine on 10.04 (which I've been doing in order to backport certain packages to install).

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