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Yeah having almost 700,000 apps in the app store. A search engine would definitely help.

How about spiders for apps. I mean they can look for high page rank sites that links to an app for example. they can then score these based from the inbound links.

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> I can't wrap my head around the sort of arrogance and myopia that makes a 21 or 22 yr old think that he can describe an entire world from such limited experience.

I like him already, If were Microsoft I _will_ hire him asap. He's the type of person who wants to make things better.

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Wanting to make things better really isn't enough. You need to be able to make it happen. Writing a blog post to the world from your limited experience that a particular company has problems is cute and probably feels good, but not really helpful to fixing the problem. If he actually explained what he would do to make things better, that would be a start.

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Yeh, he is still young enough to change the world.

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Same here, I need Tab Mix Plus for the switching of last tab behavior. The one when press CTRL+Tab it switches back to the previous tab and not the next tab.

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I consider him panicking more than shouting and threatening. I couldn't imagine having that kind of treatment as a vps customer else I'll be moving out asap.

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Because of this I moved away from GAE over a year ago. And not me alone, when GAE was still hot, 2-3 years ago, you could read tons of blog articles with unsatisfied customers.

So it doesn't surprise me to read about weird performance degradations. Since years GAE suffers from such problems.

Maybe they don't care about small customers and love to hear about them move to Heroku or to good old Virtual Servers. It would be polite to tell upfront though.

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If you were a VPS customer, you'd be less locked in and can just walk to another vendor so they actually are shit hot with support usually.

It was obvious when I first tried it that GAE has crappy support.

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What are we actually talking about when discussing "good support" and "bad support"? Is it just someone nice to talk to whilst someone else fixes a problem for you? There was an interesting article along these lines by the former President of Enterprise at Google written recently: http://gigaom.com/2013/01/26/the-delusions-that-companies-ha...

In this case, the GAE feature that underlies this issue is the Master/Slave (MS) datastore. It's been deprecated for ages in favour of the High-Replication Datastore (HRD).

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Maybe you don't rationally need someone to talk to when someone is fixing a problem for you -- but I think you need to know that the vendor is _aware_ of the problem, and is working on fixing it.

Or you start freaking out. And I don't think that's entirely irrational.

This is, among other things, why the 'post mortem' has become somewhat popular -- because it allows us to judge "Yeah, those guys DO know what they're doing, they're on top of things, the chances of outages are getting constantly smaller, not larger."

Has Google ever published such a "post-mortem" after an outage? Has Google ever even admitted there was an outage publically?

But also, yeah, rational or not, people like to have someone to talk to. In customer service in general, there are many studies showing that customers satisfaction will be higher when they are treated 'nicely' _without a solution_ than when they are treated brusquely but their problem is solved. This is not actually rational, and I'm not saying I'd like vendors to strive towards that model -- but it is apparently human psychology that vendors may want to take account of.

On the other hand, Google seems to be doing pretty fine how it is going. Although I don't know how GAE is doing, really, compared to competitors.

How Google does it, though, is basically no support at all, right? It's beyond 'good support' or 'bad support' -- with the possible exception of AdWords, is there any Google product where you can ever talk to a human about any support issue at all? For email that might be fine, especially when the email product is pretty darn reliable. For enterprise critical software... it would sure make me nervous.

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He falls in to a trap of knowing machine behavior, but not dealing with people behavior.

Insanity #2: I need somebody to talk to when a service interruption occurs

You hear about an earthquake in California, you call your aunt to make sure she is ok.

You are getting bad weather in the area you live, your mom calls and checks on you.

The server you use disappears off the internet and your providers status page hasn't been updated for a week, you '...'?

When something goes wrong, it's not an event that effects everybody (even if it is), it's an event that effects you. As long as humans are still involved in the purchasing and managing of servers you'll always need someone to call and yell at/be soothed by.

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That's true. I think that his broader point still stands, though. Once you get beyond variants of "are you working on it or do I need to convince you to?" the role of support is basically catering to irrational desires.

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There are at least 2 people on HRD that are experiencing this issue too, per TFA

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Migrating is an effort but it is always possible. In fact, when you migrate you realize how independent you are. Even if you use tons of APIs, everybody has 'em even if their interfaces are different.

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As a programmer who have to replicate bugs everyday just to tag something as confirmed, I have high respect for the word. Scientists do not, apparently.

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>As a programmer who have to replicate bugs everyday just to tag something as confirmed, I have high respect for the word. Scientists do not, apparently.

If only scientists had the option to check all their theories by spinning up snapshots of Cretaceous–Paleogene Earth in a test universe.

Unfortunately, they have to make due with an fractional set of undocumented logs in form of geology.

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The scientists didn't use that word, the journalist did.

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That's an unfair presumption. That's just a coming from a few twitter users and it doesn't really represent the whole rubyist community.

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I've found the whole rubyist community to be somewhat hateful towards any other languages. It makes it hard to want to use the language when the suggestions I get on my "gems" are "that's not ruby-enough of a name" or "You need to break out of your python mode, your name isn't clever enough" :P

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I would suggest to go get some exercise, getting active and listening to good music gets the negative energy out of your body. If you're lonely at home chat with the guys in irc #startups.

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Set up a mailing list form so we can all sign up to your new side-project :)

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This is why I like Twitter better than Facebook. In Twitter, people who follow you are really interested on what you want to say while in FB you're forced to listen to your friends (by default).

Then when you feel lonely you would just send an update to these people to listen to your feelings. Which are the people who wanted to listen to you to begin with.

Some of them might be your friends or acquaintances or just complete strangers. But the best part is they followed you and they want to hear from you.

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I like what has happened with internet radio. But opposite of boring is exciting. I still couldn't get myself excited with the present though.

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One thing that's fun to do when the present loses appeal is to envision the future. Write out in a journal page what a day in your envisioned future is like.

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