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Considering the Chromecast is plugged behind the TV, wouldn't it be really awkward to get to to tap on it?

Btw, Google has a series of APIs called Nearby (https://developers.google.com/nearby/) that are all about connecting to nearby devices but NFC doesn't seem the right answer here.

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Chromecast isn't the right brand for what the author is suggesting. But what the author is suggesting is a really neat idea.

But it's no different from having a touchscreen with an NFC contact point. The Chromecast brand has nothing to do with it. Such a box could easily be a Chromebox - with NFC & Beacon support.

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The only reason I mention the Chromecast is because it's a quite popular device, cheap, easy with an existing ecosystem of apps.

But yes, this would work with anything able to display a webpage (:Raspi..) :)

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Google Tone - publish urls via audio

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=9575291

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From Tyler Winklevoss's answer on the Product Hunt page for Gemini: "Gemini is a New York state limited liability trust company, we did not apply for or have a BitLicense which is a much lower standard. As a limited liability trust company we are a fiduciary, which allows us to accept both individual and institutional customers under New York Banking Law (unlike the BitLicense, which does not convey such fiduciary powers). In short, we can work with both Main Street and Wall Street."

Source: https://www.producthunt.com/tech/gemini-2

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So the difference is that they're trying to play nice with regulators from day 1, rather than breaking the rules and rolling with the legal punches in order to serve early adopters?

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Yeah, another to way to put it is they aim for legitimacy so they can be the bitcoin counterparty of choice for Fortune 500s and wall street. And generally run things like any sane financial institution dealing with volatile securities.

Not running a bitcoin cafe out of customer funds...

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> Yeah, another to way to put it is they aim for legitimacy so they can be the bitcoin counterparty of choice for Fortune 500s and wall street.

According to Coinbase, the total value of all Bitcoin is currently about $3.5 billion. This is a tiny, tiny market for "Fortune 500s and Wall Street" and is equivalent to the value of a single (smaller) mid-cap company. Even at its peak, the total value of all Bitcoin was only around $14 billion.

Daily Bitcoin transaction volume hasn't exceeded $100 million since July and has been as low as $33 million recently[1]. For comparison, daily volume in the FX markets exceeds $5 trillion.

Blockchain technology might be important but Bitcoin itself is about as interesting as the Burmese kyat or Gambian dalasi.

[1] https://blockchain.info/charts/estimated-transaction-volume-...

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I'm not a real trader... but i can see the value in trading something that goes up and down 30% in a quarter..

EDIT: those currencies you mention are under prolonged inflation and are tied to the economic output of some small countries... bitcoin isn't either of those

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You can trade equity options and gain or lose far more than 30% in well under 90 days.

The problem with Bitcoin is liquidity and market depth. Even if you're a small-time trader, there are better trading markets to focus your time and energy on.

Regarding the random currencies I mentioned in jest: I was making the point that any obscure currency or security is just about as interesting as Bitcoin.

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If you take the view that Bitcoin is just the start and the popularity of the blockchain to secure financial transactions will grow and become mainstream over time then this has first mover advantage written all over it.

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> ...this has first mover advantage written all over it.

No, it doesn't. Major financial institutions invest significantly in technology and many are already actively exploring the blockchain[1].

I wouldn't go so far as to say that the Winklevii can't stake out a position in the broader blockchain market, but a Bitcoin exchange isn't likely to help them establish a meaningful position.

[1] http://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2015-09-01/blythe-mas...

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Perhaps 'early' mover advantage might be a better choice of words.

> Major financial institutions invest significantly in technology...

That they may be, but that's no guarantee of success or domination. That's the whole point of the risk of startup. Also the reason for the explosion of interest. I'm not suggesting that Gemini will win, but they are in the space, at the beginning, unencumbered by old tech (as the larger institutions are) and are making overtures to the established order. We don't know where that will lead.

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The most viable opportunity relates to the application of blockchain technology to existing markets that are already dominated by major financial institutions. There is no doubt room for new companies to become blockchain technology providers to these financial institutions, but if you look at the Winklevii's investments and ventures, they are predominantly "Bitcoin as a big asset class" as opposed to "pure blockchain technology."

That's not to say that some of the technology they develop can't be repurposed for resale to other institutions, but a lot of others are already playing in the blockchain technology space and they don't have the burdens of trying to create and manage exchanges, ETFs, etc. for an "asset class" that is miniscule and heading in the wrong direction.

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There is such a thing as trading on volatility but like the other person said, the volume is so low that it's not significant.

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So why aren't they being Customer centric by allowing such tools on the iOS AppStore. Heck, even the word "Android" is banned

http://www.techhive.com/article/188696/Apple_Bans_the_Word_A...

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Most of Google's stuff seems to come across the year, not waiting for I/O with updates to core apps like Maps, Mail happening almost every Wed. For example apps like Keep, Spotlight Stories, Inbox, etc. A lot of the APIs come packaged as Play Service updates.

I/O literally feels limited to underlying platform performance improvement announcements.

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Side note: I talked to an Apple developer at WWDC and was told that HealthKit data never leaves the device (isn't synced with iCloud). Hence the lack of the iPad app. Given that, if the data is lost, its probably gone forever.

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Apple backs up your Health data in iCloud, if you enable it.

"Your data in the Health app is encrypted with keys protected by your passcode, and never leaves your device unless you choose to back it up or grant access to a third-party app. When you do choose to back up your Health data through iCloud, it is encrypted both in transit and on our servers."

https://www.apple.com/privacy/privacy-built-in/

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Do you know if the data is included in iCloud backups or iTunes backups?

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Apple isn't specific on that point in their documentation, but I'd expect it to be included only in encrypted iTunes backups, like other secure items.

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"...only in encrypted iTunes backups...", I think certain encrypted data is also stored in iCloud backups as you're required to authenticate the restore before it continues. An iCloud restore recently brought back all my email password settings etc, but an iTunes non-encrypted restore lost them.

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HealthKit apps are restricted from using iCloud and apple uses it's separate HealthKit service to back the data up I believe.

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Like LG's R Watch? http://www.engadget.com/2014/09/04/lg-g-watch-r-hands-on/)

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That actually looks pretty good! Reminds me of 007 Goldeneye for the N64.

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Back when I did a lot more web stuff, soft launches were the default way we released features. But I wonder if soft launches are possible or even desirable in the mobile apps world where a lot of press is devoted to "new" (app store sections and even blogs with a recurring "new this week" sections).

Do any mobile startups do soft launches?

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You're right it's more difficult to pull off a soft launch on mobile if you're also aiming for a feature in the App Store (Apple seems to favor new-ness when selecting apps for features). I've heard of iOS apps launching into a subset of the regional app stores as a way to soft launch (ie. excluding the US store and thus preventing Apple from featuring there before the developer is ready).

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This is exactly what Supercell, maker of Clash of Clans (currently ranked 81 in the App Store), is doing with its new game Boom Beach, which is Canada only

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I'm guessing here, but did Evernote ever do a "big" launch, or it slowly came out as the note taking app/service?

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Can someone tell me how this compares to something like StickNFind? https://www.sticknfind.com/

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StickNFind or Tile are designed to be sticked to moving objects in order to estimate their location from owner phone.

Estimote is designed to be sticked to fixed location. Think about it as a lighthouse that is broadcasting its presence and location, so smartphones and other smart devices could estimate their relative location and get the context.

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So that implies that the app locating these fixed beacons needs some kind of data backchannel to understand what it's seeing? Unless you have a cached map of that particular store and it's beacons already in your device, right?

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"Apple’s guidelines for iOS7 developers actually demand we avoid splash screens ‘or other startup experience.’"

This was an interesting line. I had a debate with my designer friend about this who pointed out that this wasn't new. Turns out, the line about no splash screens is part of the Human Interface Guidelines today. The splash screens seems to have been a community driven interface decision rather than an Apple one.

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The problem with text instead of icons is that

a)Its needs translation per language and b)it takes longer to parse/process.

The weather information in iOS7's "Today" notification is an example (http://applenapps.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/ios_7_6_not...). It takes much longer to read the exact weather information than just seeing a weather icon and getting it (IMHO).

In this article's case, it seems he use something that wasn't "iconic" as an icon.

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No, it does not take longer to process, in general. If there is a small, well-known set of icons (e.g. traffic signs), then yes, it's easier. Same is true for weather symbols - sun and clouds are well-known.

However, I find really amusing when I (as somebody who considers himself a really experienced user and gadget-fan) can't decide what the icons mean on my smartphone, then I start getting suspicious.

If you haven't seen something many times, then icons are harder to parse, simply because you don't know what they mean.

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Icons sometimes need translation too. For example, the "filter" icon only works in English because most other languages don't call funnels "filter". It would be better to show a sieve than a funnel.

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The filter one is an older convention, common in database applications. I guess it can work from a purely abstract perspective - something narrowing down, implying that you want to narrow down what's in front of you... but still, it is confusing to a new user. It feels like a search magnifying glass would convey the concept better, and simply bundle the filter UI into the search UI if an application offers both features.

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Which shows you how terrible all of these absteActions are. Search is a magnifying glass? Would that instead be zoom? Oh wait that is already the case in all photo editing apps, except they usually add a plus or minus.

Convention is just an excuse for repeating bad behavior without question.

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