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arctangent 176 days ago | link | parent | on: Aptronym

See also:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nominative_determinism

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bazzargh 176 days ago | link

As well as those (real) examples in the New Scientist, there's a long running fake correspondence section in Private Eye magazine, 'Pseudo Names'. Here's a typical, groanworthy example:

  Sir,
  In Germany, we see Pseudo Names as just a passing fancy.
  HERR TODAY
  GUNTER MORROW.


  (Sent in by Brian Clifford)

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You might want to give all that up if (a) you disagree with how they deal with customers, or (b) you think they negotiate badly, or (c) or you think they don't make the right deals, or (d) give you the wrong problems to solve, or (e) anything else along these lines.

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This doesn't take into account the value of the "hope" that buying a lottery ticket gets you. Specifically, the owner of a lottery ticket has bought the right to dream about how their life could suddenly be turned around if only their numbers came up.

I admit that this "hope" may not be worth much to some people, but to those who are scraping by it might be worth quite a lot. (I will leave discussion about whether lotteries exploit the poor to another day.)

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Funnily enough I did choose those numbers once for the UK lottery. I think I matched 4 numbers and won £50.

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arctangent 297 days ago | link | parent | on: Learn Git Branching

Git is too complicated for most use cases, but seems to be becoming a de facto standard for even the simplest collaborative tasks.

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revscat 297 days ago | link

I use it both for personal projects that will never have another human look at them, as well as for large multi-user projects.

In what was is it too complicated for most use cases? Most use cases involve "code being worked on by multiple people", in which case it has seen great success.

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grannyg00se 297 days ago | link

For simple collaborative tasks, git is rather simple. You'll need just a handful of commands.

And as a bonus, you're using a tool that has the capacity to grow as necessary.

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abraininavat 297 days ago | link

I think this complain only comes from people who are too lazy to learn git. It's really not that hard.

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Relevant recent news:

http://www.nao.org.uk/report/review-of-the-final-benefits-st...

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Another way to do this is to offer a discount for "early payment" but charge more initially. In other words, build the fee for late payment into the original quote.

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adrianhoward 333 days ago | link

Yup. I do that. I've found it works much more effectively than late fees.

People love getting a bargain. Some financial departments are setup so that they will always take the cheapest option.

Make the cheapest option the one that gets you paid up front. Made my life much simpler.

You also get some of the advantages - to channel patio11 for a moment - of "charge more". Your base day rate - the one that anchors your true value - is the "expensive" one that factors in the cost of late payment to you.

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I think this might be what you are looking for:

http://history.tamu.edu/faculty/coopersmith/coopersmith%20pe...

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He didn't take into account the law of supply and demand...

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This was interesting to read. But I would have liked to have learned a bit more about the "politics" involved in an academic career.

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pseut 348 days ago | link

My experience (not in CS) is that grad students don't really have to worry about politics.

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stevenbedrick 347 days ago | link

A properly-run academic department insulates its students as completely as possible from politics. If, as a student, you're having to concern yourself with departmental politics, it's a sign that your advisor isn't doing their job.

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stevenbedrick 347 days ago | link

That said, while your advisor's job is in part to protect you from whatever politics are going on in your department, it is important that you not be completely politically naïve when you finish.

So your advisor probably shouldn't try to keep you totally in the dark if there are political shenanigans going on in your department or university... but they should do what it takes to ensure that those shenanigans are "not your problem." In other words, said shenanigans should be educational (possibly even entertaining), but not distracting, stressful, or have any other impact on your primary purpose in life: getting your dissertation out the door.

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twelve40 348 days ago | link

Can't speak for the entire academic career, but in my CS grad school, for students and post-docs politics did not exist. Maybe it kicks in later when going after tenure or trying to win a proposal over 500 other submissions.

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