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If it's really so concerning, then perhaps the technology should be made a bit more difficult to thwart. This extension is simply changing the Referer request header.

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Sam seems so wise, even for somebody so young! Everything he writes is a pleasure to read. Calm, considered, sometimes controversial, but always worth digesting.

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Many 20 yo liberal arts students (sorry, exaggerating here) could come up with a list like that but nobody would care because they're not the head of YCombinator. With Status comes authority, with authority comes self confidence and with that comes the feeling of wisdom.

This is a good list, worth reading and talking about it; but for me wisdom means non-trivial, sometimes contraintuitive deep insight. Wisdom needs intelligence, experience and perspective (that mostly equals age). If you take any of these three out then it's usually not wisdom.

Or maybe I'm totally wrong because I definitely lack the age :)

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You're exactly right. I'd go even further and say that the piece is quite superficial and the tone of it reminds of some holy book filled with commonplace morals.

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Seems like Sam has all 3 of your points "intelligence, experience and perspective" - or does experience only get quantified in years?

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Super excited to see H&T coming to Toronto. I think I'll present a little hardware project I've got on the go.

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I always conduct exit interviews in person (how on earth would it be possible to conduct an exit interview anonymously!?). Often I have to press and poke and ask the same question 10 different ways before I actually get to the real meat of what the person wants to tell me. People naturally want to leave a good impression, they don't want to rock the boat, even if they've had a terrible experience. I don't want to hear your canned responses about getting a better opportunity elsewhere. I want to know why this company isn't that kickass opportunity. I what to know where and when we went wrong so that I can improve.

The article mentions

"If I had written what I really wanted to say in the exit interview, our final conversation could have gone much differently"

Yeah! With the sanitized responses, this conversation is just wasting my time. With the real responses, I can actually respond to your feedback and make the job better for the next guy.

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I can tell you why I never tell the truth during exit interviews: there is absolutely no upside for me and a ton of risk.

I'm already leaving, so any problems that I had at the company will disappear. If I tell the truth and it helps the company that has zero impact on me. The problem arises in that any negative comments I make could easily be construed or twisted into something that reflects negatively on me.

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With the real responses, I can actually respond to your feedback and make the job better for the next guy.

But where's my incentive to care about that?

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This strongly implies that things have failed dismally. Surely this information should be established long before exit interviews. Finding out new information in exit interviews means that management/HR haven't been doing their jobs.

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If an employee is leaving, why should they risk a negative reference in order to be candid with you? There's absolutely nothing that they can possibly gain from participating at all, let alone being honest.

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Do most people not line up a new job before leaving the last one? And my referees are specific people from jobs, rather than the company at large, and I'd not be asking someone I didn't respect to be a referee.

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When HR/Recruiters check references, they do not always restrict themselves to the list of people that you give them...

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Wow, that's what I imagine the exit interview would look like at a company who actually gives a shit and wants to improve. Fancy that.

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Enjoy daily street fighter showdowns?

Enjoy hacking on the important stuff?

Enjoy autonomy, being challenged every day, and collaborating with brilliant teammates?

If so... join Top Hat! It's great :)

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Calling this an "operating system" just seems like misdirection from the actually cool problem of visualizing distributed systems. I mean the whole thing about the Metaverse is that it's simply a vivid realization of what's already happening on the internet --- it's not some extra layer on top.

This technology is pretty impressive, and I get the marketing speak that will appeal to certain folks, but I'd rather call it what it is --- an impressive, distributed, rendering engine.

IDK, maybe I'm thinking about this all wrong.

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A minor amount of Snow Crash (the book in which the term is coined) is dedicated to descriptions of the team that built the Metaverse "protocol." It actually was software purpose-built to drive this kind of distributed VR experience, rather than a simple visualization of the Internet as it existed.

William Gibson's "Matrix" from Neuromancer was more of a visualization of data as it flew about a virtual world, doing whatever it is data does when you watch it. Certain servers are protected by layers of "ice," which you have to "drill" through in order to gain access, etc.

There are a few working groups that appear to also still be working on standards for the Metaverse: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metaverse

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Docker's design makes it incredibly easy --- or at least it makes it difficult to treat your backing services NOT like attached resources, therefore forcing you into some sort of 12factor-esque design. There's no magic to "backing services".

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Though that's very understandable I have to disagree. I've been using dwm and st for years now with nothing but love for both of them.

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Firstly, don't be ashamed of your acqui-hire - that's a hard thing to pull off and you should be proud that you didn't fall over like 99% of all startup companies do.

Secondly, take some time for yourself. Assuming the terms of the acquisition were favourable, you should have a fair amount of financial freedom (at least for a few months). Take some time to travel and see parts of the world that are new to you. For me, travel is a very effective "reset" that helps me examine my life and the world more holistically.

After founding a startup and working hard to see it succeed, you're probably used to a fast-paced cadence and it's hard to relax into a less high-producing role. Time box your relaxing so you don't feel like you're just giving up - but give yourself some space to live.

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Seems like a very logical move. First we get stable CoreOS updates, now we have private Docker index built-in.

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