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One approach would be to bake it into the value/expertise proposition of your team--these aren't just your ordinary Rails developers, or even Rails experts, but Rails contributors.

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If you obfuscated the labels and stored those elsewhere how could Google make use of it, really?

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Presumably they have to do a similar process when they add support for a language. This would just happen to be a language which was Caesar cipher of your existing language.

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Yes, I believe you're right. However, I don't think they're likely to do it for a random user who wants to try a new layout given that each one of these is not a negligible calculation.

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However, this model assumes that the people are actually sincerely trying to help you. In practice, any use of the wisdom of crowds really boils down to dealing with abuse/trolls/spam.

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This is why I think people are too quick to dismiss market fluctuations as "noise". As long as there's money to be made from the instability, those ups and downs are signal, not noise.

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If two parties both send you a song and claim to own it, how would you determine who was the original creator? This is a nontrivial problem.

From what I understand, they defer to the party with the higher revenue/sales numbers. There are ways this can be abused, and we've seen plenty, but it at least provides a larger target to be sued if they are actually behaving fraudulently.

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Someone should make a tool where you could type in keywords like "gum Singapore" and it would return a list of websites where you could find out more about it.

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Maybe we just need self-riding bikes to solve these demand balancing issues.

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My modest contribution to the discussion:

http://arxiv.org/abs/1304.3949

The paywalled (published) version is here: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/login.jsp?tp=&arnumber=675419...

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That would be nice, or maybe there could be incentives for people to move the bikes. Seeing bikes ride themselves would look great though.

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They should offer a cash reward that is less than their internal cost for a rebalancing operation. They should also implement congestion pricing. In Manhattan, I would love to be able to ride a citibike crosstown in mid town. Both stations are full in the middle of the day. If I take a bike out of the dock on the east side, I should get a credit, and I should pay money when I dock it at a busy station on the west side. It would be a wash for me, or I might pay a little. The upside is, those trips should be very easy for citibike to fullfill, it's not like riding out from an empty bike area to a crowded area.

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In some cities they reward you for returning bikes to certain locations that have a borrow/return ratio imbalance. For example, they will add bonus minutes to your card so if you go over the standard single-trip time period (e.g. 30 minutes) you can use the extra minutes to avoid getting an extra charge.

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Pittsburgh will be getting it's first bike sharing program this May, with 50 stations and I believe about 500 bikes.

If you've ever been to Pittsburgh you will immediately notice how hilly the city is in downtown and in neighboring Oakland. I look forward to the bike sharing program but I don't believe people will be very willing to bike uphill a significant distance without some reward like you are suggesting.

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That is one of the main reasons why rebalancing is needed (people being lazy).

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Either that or autonomous quadracopter bike drop ships.

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I can see how this would work for larger minorities, but it doesn't seem to scale (down): the smaller a minority, the higher variance you will see in your data. I'm not sure it helps at all when you get down to the point where you have only a single member of a group in your population.

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If this is your standard for failure, you're going to experience quite a bit of selection bias:

- Anyone who actually is driven to the point of actually committing suicide will not be around to tell stories for obvious reasons.

- Anyone who is driven to the point of bankruptcy is unlikely to stick around the Valley with its incredibly high cost of living, (unless you are talking to the homeless, which it sounds like you aren't because there are plenty of stories of failures to hear).

- He or she also probably doesn't have money for a therapist.

Realistically, the reason people like failure stories is because it is encouraging when you are in the midst of one to see examples of cases where "it gets better". It doesn't cheapen our language to use failure in this way any more than it cheapens our language to use any other form of hyperbole.

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I gave up a well-paying job moving up the IT ranks at a major national recession-proof corporation because I came down with a case of wanderlust. I squandered the money I had left and found a passion as a rock climbing instructor that left me worse off than broke. I owed money to two different national banks and was unable to open a new checking account anywhere for years. I worked a retail job for an outdoor store in one of the most economically depressed areas of the state, until I was fired for constantly being five to fifteen minutes late to work. I had no other job prospects and was left with a resume and work history that would ensure I was unemployable at my previous levels for pretty much the rest of my life. I gambled what I had left, which was almost nothing, and moved to another place with the hopes of getting a job I saw in a newspaper ad and starting over again. I was homeless and I lived out of my car for a while.

There.

See, the thing is, nobody actually wants to hear that shit. Everybody wants to hear about why that whole period of life was actually really amazing (and some parts of it were pretty good), or they want to hear the upbeat happy ending (and there is one, in this case).

But nobody wants to actually hear about a lack of success, or, like that Cake song goes, a bit of interrupted prosperity.

The people that have those stories to tell pretty quickly learn not to tell them, and what's left are people whose version of failure is, "I screwed up an account one time."

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It doesn't cheapen our language to use failure in this way any more than it cheapens our language to use any other form of hyperbole.

That's cold comfort in a world where "literally" now also means "figuratively."

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The problem of words having different magnitudes of potency depending on context is different from words being used to mean the exact opposite of their meaning in a non-ironic way.

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