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Even old busted partial tech is better than a black LCD or even with bad reception, since you don't even know when you'll have bits of data. I'm starting to think that our 'old' world is actually a massively distributed, redundant, fault tolerant information system, just not an electronic one.

Honest question, isn't it a historical bias ? maybe in his days programming projects were devoted to huge, complex and costly problems that were always pretty strictly defined, unlike the late 70s ~Apple/Microcomputer days ?

> But more importantly: this sucks all of the joy out of it! Who here got into programming out of a passion for translating formal functional specifications into formal proofs? How can any of the magic of software survive such a mindset?

Sure, but I do like the bliss of watching a tiny piece of code knowing it's sound by induction.


> maybe in his days programming projects were devoted to huge, complex and costly problems that were always pretty strictly defined, unlike the late 70s ~Apple/Microcomputer days ?

Huge? Not by today's standards. Complex? Again, not by today's standards, but they didn't have today's libraries to build on. Costly? Definitely.

Pretty strictly defined? They tried to be, but the gaps always showed. Certainly they were not strictly defined by Dijkstra's standards.


Pretty impressive scalability.

So in case of contradictory information, the pilot always has the final word, provided he takes the safest path possible ? Aren't there times where his judgement might be clouded or controllers better informed ?

For most bizjets and regional airliners, they have TCAS [0]. The rule is that pilots follow TCAS resolution, even if the controller gives them contradictory instructions.

There has only been one crash[1] where TCAS was used on both aircraft, and functioning. One of the aircraft followed the controller, ignored the TCAS resolution and a mid-air collision occurred.

[0] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traffic_collision_avoidance_sy...

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%9Cberlingen_mid-air_collis...


Yes, although if you go against ATC and it's not an emergency, they may tell you to call a special number and answer some questions (get in trouble with the FAA, have your license suspended, etc). The general idea is to listen to ATC and do as requested unless doing so would put you, your airplane, another airplane or the ground in imminent danger.

ATC are humans too, just like pilots, so mistakes sometimes happen. ATC has a larger picture, but pilots are on the scene up close. The important thing is that we work together to keep everyone safe.


> Aren't there times where his judgement might be clouded or controllers better informed ?

Sure, and the same could be said of the ATC. But the ATC never has direct control of an aircraft, unlike the pilot.


Technology and time removed frontiers, people used to be tribes, then burgs, then kingdoms, nations, USofX. Soon the notion of native, race and country may be very very blurry.

Another proof that this whole web debate isn't going anywhere useful. Lot's of old places are full of amazing content. Maybe restricted communications channels allows for smarter conversations ? You have to tailor and curate the ideas. Mailing lists for instance are still used by real developers everywhere, IRC. Add a few blogs and old boards and you get 80%.

Oh, gosh, I didn't know either, what a relief. Well, the old one wasn't a log better, but a bit more usable (tab count, and [+] to open a new tab).

I never had the reflex to use the omnibox as an url bar and wished the main screen icons would allow some kind of contextual menu (as in win7+), swiping on it would give me option to open a new tab etc etc.

TIL


The papers on THC triggering the immune system in lungs (quicker cell death, etc) aren't strong enough ? That was the main reason I wanted to try vaporized THC (bringing back air intake/capacity, asthma).

There were impressive results (quite a huge step) with ECM scaffolds producing tiny hearts, kidneys and such. More and more we're able to handle things at the sub-molecular level, so it's probable that soon we'll have spare organs.

It will be a milestone, not having to wait for someone to die to get a functioning heart or liver. Maybe no more immuno-suppressant therapies for transplantations. Questioning ourselves too.


Finally got to see the internals of a HUCard http://www.romhacking.net/forum/index.php?topic=14103.0

Brilliant form factor.

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