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The thing I like about CSM is if you hover over (or click on, I can't recall exactly) the ratings for each category they outline why which helps you make your own mind up how flexible you want to be with their recommendation.

Also gives good age ranges, not just the broad certificates.

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everybody*

* not everybody

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You might want to have a think about what the drug trade does and has done to some South American and East Asia counties before you cry victimless.

A legalised drug trade could be victimless, but not the one which exists now.

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That's true, but that's much more the consequence of the legal status of most drugs and the "drug war" policies. I would argue that online marketplaces are solving this problem, not making it worse.

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That makes absolutely no sense. The online marketplace suppliers are getting their supplies from the same wholesalers, and charging similar prices.

How are they any different?

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A bit more on this:

Android licencing means that no company is allowed to ship both Google Android and non-Google Android. This means that to ship Google Android on the phone they (Amazon) would have to ship Google Android on all Fire tablets too.

In addition under the licence Google apps need to be both installed (you have to have all of them, you can't pick and choose) and placed in particular prominent locations (so the Play Store needs to be on the first home screen). This would almost certainly mean that Google's store(s) would be have as good if not better positions than Amazon's own stores on the device. More than that there are restrictions around app stores which compete with Google play which would, at the very least, restrict Amazon's ability to pre-install and operate their own app store.

Given that Amazon's reason for making these devices in the first place is to sell content - videos, music, books and apps - stock Android is to all intents and purposes a non-starter for them.

See here: https://www.theinformation.com/Google-s-Confidential-Android... for more information.

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Two KSP mentions:

Q: In order to use the full MCT design (100 passengers), will BFR be one core or 3 cores?

EM: At first, I was thinking we would just scale up Falcon Heavy, but it looks like it probably makes more sense just to have a single monster boost stage.

Q: Nice to see you are doing things the Kerbal way.

EM: Kerbal is awesome!

The second one:

Q: "Hi Elon! Huge fan of yours. Have you heard of/played Kerbal Space Program? Also do you see SpaceX working with Squad (the people behind KSP) to integrate SpaceX parts into KSP?"

Reply (not from EM): What do you think SpaceX uses for testing software?

EM to Reply: Kerbal Space Program!

Short version - Elon Musk likes and plays Kerbal Space Program.

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Interestingly if you put in the cliche American free market priorities (jobs, income high, safety, work life balance, environment low, everything else in the middle) the US does come out top (as opposed to high but not top on a more even measure).

The same things seems to happen if you put in the sort of priorities other countries are generally believed to hold (so put in the environment, satisfaction, work life balance and so on and the Scandinavian countries leap to the top).

So if there is any truth in the cliches, countries do seem to optimise for what is important to them. Which I guess is what you'd hope happened.

As an aside there doesn't seem to be too much you can do to stop Australia being a great place to live - they don't have a slider for "Deadly animals".

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The deadly animals in Australia are the same everywhere - people. The wildlife does far, far less damage.

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Government surveillance would be a good slider. Commonwealth countries are notoriously short on protections for things like that.

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As an Australian the thing that makes Australia a great place to live is the same that makes it suck - distance. It does have California's weather without the risk of earthquakes which is hard to beat :)

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But does it have California's Jobs? :)

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I don't know of anyone called Steve Jobs in Australia, no.

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What about drop bears?

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> Australia being a great place to live - they don't have a slider for "Deadly animals"

Australia has poisonous snakes and America has grizzly bears -- only New Zealand can claim no deadly animals.

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Australia also has crocodiles, box jelly fish, sharks, lethal spiders...

I don't think that I'm imagining that Australia has more species of lethal animals than any other country.

EDIT: Just to be clear, I'm not saying Australia isn't a great place to live. I've only been to Melbourne and then only for three weeks but it seemed great. There are just lots of things which can kill you there (though the Australian's have naturally got very good at stopping that happening).

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Obviously you have never met a drunk kiwi.

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Kiwi fruit are actually from northern China and weren't introduced to New Zealand until the 20th century.

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Kiwi is slang for New Zealanders[1]. It is also a bird native to New Zealand[2].

[1]: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Kiwi&defid=20...

[2]: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiwi

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Not sure if that's just compounding the joke, but if not - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiwi

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The submission was about China, not New Zealand, so forgive me for being a bit bemused.

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Grizzly bears don't hide in relatively short grass and are very rare and limited to certain areas, and nor does America have spiders that bite your ass when you are trying to poo. Well, we might, but they aren't deadly.

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Their health index seems... unreliable.

http://www.oecdbetterlifeindex.org/topics/health/

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Any deficiency in the "Deadly Animal" slider is easily balanced by the massive surplus on their "Ute Availability" slider.

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Worth pointing out now that Ember Data is still in Beta. It's a late Beta so you're probably safe but it's not impossible that it will change.

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We're using Ember and have been for a couple of years now and it's come a long way in that time. 12 months ago I'd have struggled to recommend it but it's improved significantly.

What I would say is that like most frameworks it makes things easy when you do it the way it wants you to and will fight you like crazy when you don't. The downside with Ember, probably more than most, is the way it wants you to do things isn't always as obvious as it might be. There is a way and you're going to be able to do what you want to do but you're probably going to have to dig a bit and it might not be intuitive.

Short version: expect something of a learning curve.

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Plus you opt out of the recommendations. I'm not sure what that means for it actually scanning your device and passing it to Twitter.

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Switching costs are low but the barriers to entry into the market are massive - Larry and Sergi starting out today wouldn't be able to build a competitive search engine.

The more interesting question (to me at least) is whether search will be as important going forward as it has been for the past 20 years. As more data and activity moves into apps, more stuff is being silo-ed off from Google. Sure apps might be a blip before stuff moves back to the web but if they're not then Google may remain dominant in search but search itself may become a smaller part of the whole.

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