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Los Alamos is in the middle of nowhere, but Sandia is smack in the middle of a metro area of ~1M people (Albuquerque).

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cwal37 7 days ago | link

Right, sorry! I tend to forget they're not literally next to each other since they're both nuclear security labs and in the same-ish area.

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RK 11 days ago | link | parent | on: Ask HN: Idea Sunday

I'd like some UI element that lets me know how long it's been since I read/used a tab. I tend to open lots of tabs and then browse them as is convenient later. Sometimes this means tabs get "lost" (i.e. become stale before I read them). This would let me know which tabs I might have overlooked or should close, bookmark, etc.

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Many Irish already had their names Anglicized by the English before they left Ireland.

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RK 40 days ago | link | parent | on: SR-72

I'm not that familiar with military aircraft development timelines, but this stuck out as my favorite part:

A hypersonic plane does not have to be an expensive, distant possibility. In fact, an SR-72 could be operational by 2030.

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andrewfong 40 days ago | link

By comparison, the SR-71 was first proposed around 1960 and operational by 1966. http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/SR-71_Blackbird

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javajosh 40 days ago | link

This is one of the most perplexing things about our modern world - the seemingly exponential increase in the length of time it takes to get anything done, especially large, technically complex projects. This is true for the Saturn V, for the World Trade Center, dams, highways, high speed rail, etc. It makes me wonder where these "productivity improvements" really are, especially the ones that computers presumably give us. Perhaps AutoCAD and MS Word and email make us feel more productive, but are actually slowing us down. Or perhaps all of it just increases the velocity of money through the economy, which particularly helps those whose income is proportional to transaction rate (banks, brokers, and governments).

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blakesterz 40 days ago | link

That's a good question, I think, thought I'm not sure, the answer is people are now far more expensive, adding more people means less money is made. Let's use your dams example. They built a bunch of big dams in the 50s and 60s and each one had more than 10,000 people working on it. They were mostly publicly financed, so more or less not built to make money. They didn't worry about adding a few more (or a few hundred more) people to the job because they were cheap. Now, the people that do this work are really expensive, and adding a few more means the people in charge make less money. Another big thing is probably rules and regulations and laws, far fewer back then. Good? Bad? I dunno.

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andrewfong 40 days ago | link

I don't think it's the cost of people. Technology has done a pretty good job of reducing the cost of simple labor. But technology hasn't done a great job of managing complexity. See, for example, the above jab at the "millions of lines of software code" managing the SR-72. That stands in stark contrast to the "keep it simple stupid" motto attributed to Kelly Johnson, the SR-71's designer.

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JetSpiegel 40 days ago | link

Progress!

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Nice reference.

1.29 happened to be exactly what I was looking for:

  for subset in itertools.chain(*(itertools.combinations(a, n) for n in range(len(a) + 1)))
I spent way too much time writing a function to come up with these combinations.

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rockymeza 39 days ago | link

You can also do

    itertools.chain.from_iterable(itertools.combinations(a, n) for n in range(len(a) + 1))

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I just checked put my sites using elinks and fortunately they came out pretty well.

One is based on bootstrap and one on skeleton. I just made some links that are icons (github, twitter, etc) visible in elinks by adding img tags with src="" alt="some text" style="display:none". Seems like an OK hack.

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On the other hand Mel Gibson was Aussie and became American. He's not claimed anymore.

According to Wikipedia, Mel Gibson was born in the US to American parents and moved to Australia when he was 12. Somehow I remembered that factoid when I read your comment :)

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gregsq 44 days ago | link

Thanks. I didn't fill in that detail. I thought only his mother was American, and I should always check my facts before I post anything here. So in, and then out, but oddly, out in a similar way that Rupert Murdoch is out.

Pride and Prejudice.

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RK 73 days ago | link | parent | on: Who's Writing Linux?

For those wondering:

Linaro is a not-for-profit engineering organization that works on consolidating and optimizing open-source software for the ARM architecture, including the GCC toolchain, the Linux kernel, ARM power management, graphics and multimedia interfaces. It was announced at Computex in June 2010 by ARM, Freescale Semiconductor, IBM, Samsung, ST-Ericsson, and Texas Instruments in a joint press conference. It also provides aligned engineering and investment in upstream open source projects, a monthly release of tools and software and support to silicon companies in upstreaming their system-on-a-chip (SoC) support.

That makes sense why Linaro is the 5th biggest contributer. (I'd never heard of them.)

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rjzzleep 73 days ago | link

might have heard of them but ignored it, because it didn't resonate as much with you.

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2012/06/android-performance-b...

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I don't know that much about Jeopardy strategy, but it sounds like he's following Ken Jennings' suggestions.

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Just FYI, there are a couple of initiatives in the medical imaging world to reduce over exposure:

* http://www.imagewisely.org/

* http://www.imagegently.org/

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