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This whole thing makes no sense for me. I go through Cricket Wireless, which is $40/mo for unlimited minutes and 2.5GB of high-speed data (then throttled to pretty much useless). I would say is equal to their plan that has 2GB. I actually only pay $35/mo due to auto-pay, so even cheaper than their $40 and I get more data.

I don't see their offering as competitive at all.

edit: just saw the "plus taxes and fees" of which there is none for me. So, I pay even less now.

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apparently you've never heard of people guessing passwords...

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All the restrictions banks give don't make the password less guessable. Lots of people can still use their birth year, or their postal code. Banks are mainly a PITA, not really "securer".

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There's a difference between non-complex and guessable. You don't need to have a 16+ character password to make it non guessable. My comment was referring to brute forcing rather than guessing...

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it's a minor URL change, not some major habit change.

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"live like a homeless man" is going to the extreme. But it's either retire in 10 years, or 30.

You need sacrifices to get a reward.

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Except it doesn't feel like sacrifice after a while.

Netflix/Cable TV --> reading a book (from the library) or HN. Starbucks --> broaden your horizons and explore the world of "grind your own." Eating out more than once a week --> eating out once a week, and preparing healthy meals the rest. Sometimes having your friends over for dinner. Gym membership --> enjoy looking for new kettlebell and bodyweight exercises that you can do at home. Go for walks with your wife in the evenings, or incorporate walking/exercise into your weekly date.

I'll admit that overseas travel is one area where I still overspend, so this would fall into the "sacrifice" category if I were to cut back. Even so, the skills in frugality that you learn while working your day job are useful on overseas trips. Haggling while jostling with old ladies at a wet market (in a language you don't understand) in order to buy ingredients for breakfast and a packed lunch is an experience that many travelers will miss out on.

(full disclosure: last holiday was a "relax by the hotel pool/private beach" affair. But even then we had a trip to the supermarket to buy some beer, fruit and snacks instead of pay hotel rates).

Anyway, it's not something that happens over night, rather a skillset you work on like any other. You find your own level of "sacrifice," your own groove, that you're comfortable with. Mr Money Mustache is just one guy but there are plenty of people who have entire sites dedicated to the movement who can talk about this idea of "sacrifice" better than I can.

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This right here is the real lesson. Comcast is not going to lower rates for everyone else because of this.

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"Choose to" is a very interesting choice of words seeing how the vast majority of their market is that they are they only option and people have no choice.

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Most places in the US have at least two wired options, and two or more wireless options. And, if Comcast charges too much, and cities allow it (as with Google Fiber), other options will arrive.

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I call BS. I live in a suburb of San Francisco and have a choice between Comcast and 5Mbps DSL. In other words, I have no choice whatsoever because my telecommuting (and Netflix and Hulu and...) need higher speed bursts than that.

And these are still better options than my family in the Midwest and New York have available to them. You just can't claim with a straight face that there's competition in this market.

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> better options than my family in the Midwest

Minneapolis is a beacon of hope, here. $40 for 100 Mbps / 100 Mbps in much of the city, from a local fiber provider.

That's what kills me. Comcast's audacity is just so much more galling when you've actually experienced what happens with competition. And not that competition is a panacea, necessarily. I don't have a say in my water, gas, or electricity providers, but in exchange for that monopoly, they're subject to pretty serious regulation.

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Indeed, let's make everyplace like Minneapolis, or Google Fiber cities, by fixing each local market with new options.

That's much better than nationally locking-in a pipes-and-sewers-like regulatory structure that freezes incumbents into a safe but slow-moving regulated approach, for decades.

The decades of Title-II-regulated AT&T telecom monopoly were not good for consumers or innovation. They were safe and slow.

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You have two wired options, which is exactly what I said. (You can't call 'BS' if your facts are consistent with my claims!)

I have 5Mbps DSL in San Francisco. It's plenty for HD Netflix and Hulu, VOIP, and video-calling.

I suspect you also have 3+ wireless options, some of which likely offer 20Mbps+ in bursts. Yes, it costs more. Yes, you'd like to pay less. Everyone would! But your desire for more modern luxury goods (massive HD bandwidth), cheaper, is not a public policy crisis.

Someone has to invest more to give you more, and market-floating prices for the existing paths are exactly what draws in more investment – or sends you a signal that you should 'self-help' to the nearest source of plentiful bandwidth.

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The road my Dad lives on has no cable lines because it would apparently be unprofitable for Comcast to run them. This was told to me by a manager I somehow was able to get on the phone more than 10 years ago, and it is still that way out there. Comcast has an exclusive monopoly to service that road but choose not to. All roads connected to it have Comcast lines and the nearest line is less than a half mile away. He is too far away for DSL and other such options. His only choices are Dial-up and unreliable satellite (trees around yard).

I understand he is an exception, but it is not nearly as uncommon as you are implying.

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Exclusive cable monopolies have been illegal for over 20 years.

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Over 93% of the population has wired broadband access – over 99% if wireless options are considered:

http://www.broadbandmap.gov/blog/

So yes, your father's property is an unfortunate outlier. His main beef should be with the local authorities who granted Comcast a monopoly without a prompt requirement-to-service.

(And in places where Comcast is truly the only provider, local regulation until other options arrive makes sense. Just not nationally, when almost everywhere has 2+ wired options and 3+ wireless options, and could also incrementally add new wires and towers far more easily than outlying/non-urban places.)

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King will more than likely sue anyone making a Bejeweled clone for copying their game.

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It could very well be WPF using XAML

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> I challenge you to go explain to anyone you know who does not identify as a 'computer person' how email routing works

I usually use the "It's like mailing a postcard" comparison.

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seems that how they generate the keys, it's basically the same. The same password would generate the same keys. Anyone who uses the same password would be able to decrypt data sent to anyone else using the same password.

Am I understanding this correctly?

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If I send you an encrypted file with minilock, you won't know my password, and I won't know yours, but you'll be the only one that can read it, and also you'll be sure I've sent it and not anyone else.

Public key crypto has more advantages and users should understand the basics. This introduction may be more clear (4:30) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMiBwMHcSn0

Also I would only use their 7-random-words feature for passwords.

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