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I've made my fair share of hairball networks over the years. but I don't think this fixes the issue. The problem is that biological network diagrams of sufficient detail to be accurate, are far too complicated to be useful. Plus, biologists are often sloppy with their data model for these things: mixing genes and proteins for example. In those cases, what does a line between two nodes even mean?

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If you have a complicated system, the best way to deal with the complexity is to organize it in some fashion. BioFabric provides a way to do that, since it allows the network to be arranged in a linear fashion. Kinda like the advantages of organized adjacency matrix views, but with the intuitive link-hopping model of node-link diagrams. I can't argue that if you put garbage data in, you get garbage out. But, over time, very large but high-quality biological networks will emerge.

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Syapse Inc -- Palo Alto & Philadelphia, PA

You can build advertising networks, make tools for financial institutions, help retailers target buyers...the options are endless. But are you excited by any of these choices?

There is another option: you could be a part of a team helping to cure cancer, stop heart disease, and deliver the right drugs to the right people at the right time with software for Precision Medicine.

Syapse software helps healthcare providers use next-generation genomic and molecular data, in context with complex clinical data (medical history, treatment, outcomes, cost, etc.) spread across multiple systems, to make the best decisions regarding patient care.

See here for all the open positions: http://syapse.com/about/careers/

I'm especially looking to hire Customer Solutions Engineers for the Philly office (http://syapse.com/about/careers/openings/?gh_jid=32512). So if you're on the East Coast and always wanted to join a Bay Area startup, but didn't want to relocate, now is your chance! We're especially interested in people with Python experience. Any experience with healthcare, electronic health records, or genomics is a bonus.

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Syapse Inc -- Palo Alto & Philadelphia, PA

Syapse provides a precision medicine data platform that enables laboratories, registries, and providers to use molecular profiling to diagnose and treat patients.

See here for all the open positions: http://syapse.com/about/careers/

I'm especially looking to hire Customer Solutions Engineers for the Philly office. So if you're on the East Coast and always wanted to join a Bay Area startup, but didn't want to relocate, now is your chance! We're especially interested in people with Python and JS experience. Any experience with healthcare, electronic health records, or genomics is a bonus.

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LOVED these as a kid. I loved building all sorts of fans and paddleboat things. Only bummer was that my mom who knew jack about electronics was hyper-paranoid that I was going to electrocute myself playing with them in water. I used to sneak them into the bathroom and put them in the sink behind her back.

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This might be one of my most favorite posts of Patrick's ever. It's often so much easier to start something new than it is to sustain something old. Hanging around HN too long makes you an addict of "new". Guess what: growing and sustaining a business for the long haul is hard, even for patio11.

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Syapse Inc -- Palo Alto & Philadelphia

Syapse provides a precision medicine data platform that enables laboratories, registries, and providers to use molecular profiling to diagnose and treat patients.

See here for all the open positions: http://syapse.com/about/careers/

I'm especially looking to hire Customer Solutions Engineers for the Philly office. So if you're on the East Coast and always wanted to join a Bay Area startup, but didn't want to relocate, now is your chance! We're especially interested in people with Python and JS experience. Any experience with healthcare, electronic health records, or genomics is a bonus.

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I fully admit you may not be the right person for this question, but IBM has made a lot of hay about Watson in healthcare: lots of booths and talks at industry conferences, trotting out partner medical centers, PR pieces in the Wall Street Journal, etc... Despite all the noise, I have yet to see any sort of peer-reviewed clinical study that demonstrates the application of Watson in a real healthcare setting to improve patient outcomes. Has any study like this been conducted?

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We do have many actual projects with several healthcare providers. We have functioning systems (see one here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8lGJ0h_jAp8) and we are starting to deploy them. But the deployments are made very cautiously and in stages (and not yet broad enough for full study) because that's the nature of healthcare.

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While this is not peer-review , it's interesting :

http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pressrelease/43231.wss

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This is entirely unsurprising if you've spent time around enterprise software. I once worked in a very large, global (non-IT) company that was interested in software made by a very well-known, large, global IT company. We wanted to see a demo of their product. They pushed back saying "we don't need to do a demo, we're XYZ company you know we can do it. A demo isn't worth our time. If you want a demo, we will have to charge you $XX,000 of professional services". My employer at the time paid it.

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we don't need to do a demo, we're XYZ company you know we can do it

I think this just made my day.

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Apple has been testing sapphire. It has been in the cover for the camera since the iPhone 5 over two years ago. What is interesting is that they have gone back to glass for the lens cover in the new phones. My wife had a problem with her iPhone 5 shortly after purchase. After she dropped it on the floor (not especially hard) photos had these small, magenta flecks that no amount of cleaning could get rid of. Apple swapped it out no problem, but when I first heard that they moved back to glass for the new camera in the 6 series, I wondered if they decided that sapphire just wasn't going to work for this use case.

I suspect, they've learned quite a bit from the sapphire cover on the camera, hence their comfort in deploying it to the higher end watch models.

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They have not gone back to glass

> Sapphire crystal lens cover [all iPhone models]

http://www.apple.com/iphone/compare/

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The article addresses the so-called airborne nature of Ebola in other species and calls into question whether or not it was truly airborne in those instances. Furthermore, "very nearly airborne" is not a fair characterization. Bodily fluids transmit the disease, and Ebola's particular ability to make people spew lots of virus all over the place from every available orifice seems to be the primary way to spread. The odds of getting droplets in the eye, on a small cut on your skin, etc... as a healthcare worker are very high if someone is spraying virus-laden blood all over the place. But this is not what we're talking about with a truly airborne virus. In the case of an airborne virus like influenza, you have infection via the upper respiratory tract from viral particles that survive for extended amounts of time in aerosols suspended in the air. There is no evidence Ebola can or does spread in this manner.

Obviously nobody can predict the future, but viruses that infect via the airway are highly evolved to do so. The article touches on it a bit, but doesn't get into the real specifics. I'm going from memory here, but I recall that in things like the common cold and influenza, the viral proteins have specific humidity, pH, and temperature requirements in order to dock with receptors in just the right part of the airway in order to maximize infection. You don't get that without significant evolutionary pressure which as far as I can tell is totally absent in the current environment. The virus is easily spreading via direct contact with body fluids, so even if it develops an ability to spread by air, this offers little advantage over the plain old bodily fluid route.

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