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For the merchant? Sure. For the customer? Not at all.

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This seems like a reimplementation of ST using an unspecified State Mem.

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tel 1 day ago | link

It's not yet, but—to cheat a bit here—eventually we're going to use `Mem` to get quite intimate with `ST` and show why it's important to use `ST` perhaps more often than people even anticipate.

If you'd like, try to instantiate something along the lines of `Mem (State (IntMap v))`. It's slightly trickier than it looks due to some typing issues (which don't matter, but I'll save the reveal). It's also likely to be slightly buggy.

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I'm all for migrating to git, but at least one aspect of the OpenBSD workflow would take some serious thought to migrate: CVS supports having one giant repository containing everything (at least, as well as it supports anything else), even including project source code, whereas git really wants smaller per-project repositories that share common history with the corresponding upstreams. In light of that, migrating to git would require some non-trivial workflow changes, making it understandable that it hasn't happened in a hurry.

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Thinking about interest and growth does help put prices in perspective. Using mortgage interest rates doesn't work as well these days, since they've fallen so much, but you can use the standard market growth rates instead: either 7% or 4% depending on whether you take inflation into account.

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Comfortable reading widths should use font-relative measurements, not pixel measurements. The various studies about readability talk about words per line, which depends on font-relative width. For instance, you might set a line width in em or ex.

On a 1080p or even 2160p TV, the text should absolutely go all the way across, using a large font readable from across a room. On a high-resolution tablet, the font should still likely go all the way across the screen in portrait mode, and most of the way across in landscape mode, even though either one likely has more than 1024 pixels. On a phone, the font likely should go all the way across the screen in either portrait or landscape mode.

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taeric 4 days ago | link

Right, this is definitely the more correct way. I'm just saying that, by and large, many designers were not doing anything bad if they set a width for their design at 1024. It isn't that they were wrong or right. They were just using a simplification that largely worked.

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Containers are the new craze, because they're much lighter-weight and easier to deploy than full-system virtual machines. Docker is simply a convenient approach to container distribution and deployment, designed to package up an application as a self-contained invokable container.

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Svenstaro 4 days ago | link

Excuse me, but isn't this essentially chroots reinvented?

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VLM 4 days ago | link

That is exactly it, with a couple more isolation features added. So more than just the FS but also some memory / cpu limiting and general sandboxing.

Interestingly most "real virtualization" requires somewhat recent hardware but LXC containers don't take much if any, so "free machine off junk heap" is good enough for experimentation.

Historically there have been strange intercontainer isolation problems so don't assume its as perfect as hardware assisted virtualization.

Also you're sharing a kernel which is both good and bad, if you were hoping to test out a new kernel or run an entirely different OS, thats too bad.

Edited to add, another fun analogy if you like the chroot analogy, is when spinning up a process was glacial on windows (but not too bad on linux) that lead to the development and push to use threads which were a huge win on slow windows not so much on linux but we got dragged along anyway. In a similar manner, full virtualization is really slow to deploy and spin up and spin down, containers are smaller and weaker but much like threads vs processes are much faster to start up or shutdown. A really low latency or fast spinup spindown virtualization tech would probably wipe most demand for containerization. Or what I'm getting at is, spawning processes on windows was super slow, so we got threads, and spawning full hardware virt is slow, so we get containerization aka chroot++

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Svenstaro 3 days ago | link

Alright, thanks a lot for the explanation then! Then my concept wasn't entirely wrong.

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Yes, exactly; if you don't start out by doing the math, the result can seem unintuitive.

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Nice!

As an aid to extracting the right body content, have you considered comparing multiple pages from the same site, and giving greater weight to content that differs (the article) rather than content that stays the same (the navigation)?

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> There is still a huge sentiment against GMOs, everyone think they are harmful to health here in France. I don't know how long it will take for the mentality to change.

About as long as it takes for people to stop believing in homeopathy and other snake oil.

Worse yet, even if there were some as-yet unknown health risk, it would have to be a plague-level threat to counterbalance the benefits to food production. That added food production can save millions of lives.

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lanekelly 10 days ago | link

Plague-level is actually the degree of risk we are dealing with in regards to GMOs (not necessarily in likelihood, but in impact). In regards to the famine argument, consider the following:

"Invoking the risk of "famine" as an alternative to GMOs is a deceitful strategy, no different from urging people to play Russian roulette in order to get out of poverty. While hunger is a serious threat to human welfare, as long as the threat remains localized, it falls under risk management and not the PP [precautionary principle]." [1]

[1] "The Precautionary Principle," a paper coauthored by Nassim Taleb of Black Swan fame. Link: https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B8nhAlfIk3QIbGFzOXF5UUN3N2c/... Also referenced elsewhere in these comments: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=7985787

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If it's the same name as your HN username, I don't see any obvious way to mispronounce it, other than whether the first 'o' is long or short. Is that the bit people mispronounce?

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vitd 10 days ago | link

My Polish friends tell me that speaking in Polish "ow" is pronounced like the English word "off" (or maybe "of"? I forget) instead of the English word "ow". So "off-ski" or "uv-ski" instead of "ow-ski", at least for some of them.

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Kluny 10 days ago | link

I'm guessing any pronunciation errors are caused by people misreading it and skipping letters or adding extra ones.

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strozykowski 10 days ago | link

This is pretty close to what happens. It's generally phonetic, and yet there seems to be a wide variety of first pronunciations, which deviate from the phonetic by several syllables either way.

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