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Riding the public interest wave about the attacks in Paris makes making click-bait easier than ever!

Additionally the article can be summarized as: "We don't know how the attacks were co-ordinated... so maybe strong encryption, and by proxy, Snowden, are to blame?"

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There are some strange superstitions w.r.t. death in Japanese culture. In Japanese the number 4 sounds sort of like death so it's a number they avoid a lot (it's missing from many elevator options, similar to how 13 is skipped sometimes) and patterns of squares are sometimes avoided to prevent having 4 corners meet (especially with straw mats).

I had never heard of this, though. The class of untouchables who work close to death. Really interesting stuff.

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As other comments pointed, this caste system itself isn't really a "secret". We learn in school that it had existed, and there are quite a few stories dealing with it (A novel "The Broken Commandment" (破戒) by Touson Shimazaki, and an epic manga series "Kamui" (カムイ伝) are among the best ones; both have been translated to English).

However, things got complicated in modern society; officially the government denies the discrimination exist; some people still keeps prejudice; and the topic is used as a political tool.

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> similar to how 13 is skipped sometimes

Sometimes?

"Based on records of buildings with Otis brand elevators, as many as 85 percent of the high rises in the world don't have a 13th floor, says Dilip Rangnekar, spokesman for the Farmington, CT-based elevator maker." - http://realtytimes.com/todaysheadlines1/item/15685-20020913_...

Superstitions are alive and well around the world. In the U.S., the number of people who still turn to astrology when it comes explaining success or failure in dating and relationships will astound you. Even in places like New York City.

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In reply to tsotha, 1801 Century Park East, Los Angeles, CA 90067 is an example. At least it was when I worked there after law school (ahem some time ago).

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I'm sort of curious as to where these buildings are. I've never seen one on the US west coast.

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>the number 4 sounds sort of like death

This is actually true in all the major Asian languages, surprisingly. [0]

[0] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetraphobia

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Eight, on the other hand, is extremely lucky.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Numbers_in_Chinese_culture#Eig...

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Not really surprising since all of those languages (except maybe Vietnamese) derive the pronunciation of both words from Middle Chinese.

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4 and 9 are avoided. 9 is a homophone for "suffering".

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Fighting a somewhat reasonable request with fraud seems right out of the gray zone and solidly in the territory of immorality.

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>he wakes up every morning believing he is still in Germany in 2005, waiting to visit the dentist. Without a record of new experiences, the passing of time means nothing to him. Today, he only knows that there is a problem because he and his wife have written detailed notes on his smartphone, in a file labelled “First thing – read this”.

Literally 50 First Dates...

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Much like the movie, yes, though in her case it was a daily, not an hourly, thing. It's nice that the film seems to be based on a real-life condition and portrays it fairly accurately.

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I mentioned this to a psychologist and she laughed at me very hard. She was a professor and said that she uses the movie 50 First Dates in her class -- by having them write down everything that is wrong. She says it's so horribly inaccurate that it makes for a good long discussion.

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Out of curiosity what are some of the things wrong with it?

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This page doesn't like the film, and lists some mistakes, but also lists some of the accurate bits.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/psychologist-the-movies...

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The only real "issue" that article seems to take with the movies was that (A) it used a term that doesn't exist to describe a condition that does have an actual name and (B) it was a cheesy romcom. But I mean, do you really expect any Adam Sandler movie to get to the real grit of living with a terrible disease?

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We didn't get into it deeply, but apparently the biggest issue is that it wouldn't be a daily thing. The recycle period is usually measured in minutes.

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His daily reaction to the appearence of his aging wife, and his own aging appearence, must be interesting.

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That's the part about this I'm so hung up on -- that this poor guy not only has this crippling condition, but that he has to come to terms with it every hour and a half, forever.

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Memento

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Just today I was actually thinking laziness was one of my greatest assets as a developer. Always trying to find a way to make my work do as much of itself as it can, haha.

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To be honest, it's not actually 'laziness' as much 'desire for automation'. I've worked with a few actually lazy developers in my time, and it's not fun. For example, it's hard to be a software tester when the design documentation, in it's entirety, is on an A4 sheet in the lead developer's desk, and he's too lazy to make a copy for you. That was medical software, no less...

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I think "desire for automation" is in the right direction, but doesn't quite hit the mark. For me, it's more like "not wanting to solve the same problem twice". I don't really care if it's automated or not, but once I've solved a problem I don't want to think about it again (unless there's some new twist).

At my last job I was always getting bugged by support people asking me the same questions over and over. So I wrote documentation/guides telling how to solve the common issues.

TL;DR: it's not so much "robots are awesome" as "ain't nobody got time for that!".

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I would categorize it as efficiency. Laziness is when you have the means to do something, but you're just not willing to do it. Efficiency is when you take 2 hours today to save 10 minutes every day for the next 5 years.

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"I shall probably do little more but be content to admire the strides others made in Science." - Charles Darwin

Understatement of the millenia?

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Anecdotal, but I chat with a friend from San Francisco and he was telling me recently that he was feeling down because a funeral was coming up. It was about the 6th or 7th death of someone close to him that he had experienced, about half of them being suicides.

I can't even begin to fathom what that must feel like, I don't know anyone but older family members who have passed away.

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High school guidance counselors strongly encourage students into pursuing university.

When I was in high school it didn't seem like there even was a viable option other than Computer Science, which I know now is largely unrelated to most software development. Of course, you could argue I didn't do my due diligence, but it was the guidance counselor's job to guide me and I trusted them implicitly. In retrospect, that in and of itself taught me a valuable lesson about critical thinking.

Everyone I've talked to has said they haven't used a single bit of calculus in a professional capacity since graduating. I may be succumbing to confirmation bias, but I've never heard to the contrary.

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Oh man... https://www.google.com/search?q=tilt#q=ling+rush&safe=off

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>Boo, scary websites want to know where you are.

Nothing wrong with being alarmed by a site that automatically plays music and wants to know where you live.

If the cashier at Subway or any other stranger with whom you had minor contact one day asked where you lived wouldn't you be more than just a little alarmed?

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What if a major retailer asked for your ZIP code at the register? This happens to me often and is much more analogous to the situation than a cashier asking where I live.

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I decline. They don't need to know this.

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