Hacker Newsnew | comments | show | ask | jobs | submit | login

Does not work offline! No choice for me.

-----


For stuff like this, you use schema.js.

-----


Even better http://www.google.com/trends/?q=facebook,+google&ctab=0&...

-----


Why? This makes perfect sense. Who Google's Google?

-----


That's it, the developer has defined the pointing position for every photo manually.

-----


That's what I assumed until I pointed to ~20x20px from the top right corner and got a picture of a house in a flood.

-----


What is the point about this beyond showing pictures where the finger is next to my cursor? (Why is this popular?) It's not more interesting than a circumference search. You could implement that with a simple rtree.

-----


We have learned JS, probably you forgot that you need to know it to learn CS?

-----


This and debugging are my two biggest gripes about CoffeeScript. If you are saying this, then you probably never learned JavaScript to the extent that would be required to write what you are writing in CoffeeScript. Maybe that is a good thing and a testament to the power of CoffeeScript.

I am currently working with a bunch of people who don't understand functional scope nor closures (fully). They do, however, understand that sometimes they need to use "=>" for function declarations instead of "->".

-----


Better you don't work with those people. I don't want to blame you for their lack of knowledge. But if you want to do them (and you and your project) some good, order them to learn JavaScript thoroughly (which includes the unexpected but regular features that deviate from other languages and the common pitfalls), and then go back to CS! CS inherits from JS and makes no sense without it and it fixes some pitfalls but just the ones that you can fix with the constraints and additions of a new grammar. This is not the hard path but the only path to CS.

-----


You are making wide, sweeping judgements that are almost certainly not representative of the majority of people using CoffeeScript.

-----


They are accurate representations of the people I have met and worked with. The sad truth is that most people do not really know javascript.

-----


This is not necessary since you usually add the CS version to your dev dependencies (package.json). That should be enough. The resulting JS should not show any reference to CS at all.

-----


You assume coffee code running in the context of a npm-based package.

coffee can also be used in the browser using the Rails asset pipeline (where you'd have the Gemfile, granted), or other methods (where you might have no indication).

The only place where I would like this line not to be shown is when I try to sneak coffee code into a codebase where only specific languages (JS in this case) are allowed and all code has to be originally written in any of these languages.

But honestly, if you are this devious, removing the line will be easy for you and, secondly, even though the coffee compiler produces really nice JS code, one glimpse is usually enough to recognize coffee compiler output as such, so removing that one line hides nothing.

-----


+1 (and substack is talking)

-----


Stop wasting your time by rewriting existing JavaScript implementations in other languages that compile to JavaScript!

-----


Hm..? The only ALAC implementations we know of is the Apple one (in C++), David Hammerton's one in C, and ours in Coffeescript.

-----


I use CoffeeScript in nearly all my JS packages now, and I like it a lot. But I do not like how many people use it. I use only a subset of the features. The most important aspects are: short function syntax, implicit vars, short object syntax, function binding to this, @. I always use brackets when calling functions, because you need to use them anyway, when you do not pass any arguments. Omitting brackets makes CS nearly unreadable. CoffeeScript is a big win for whatever I am doing. The resulting JavaScript is more stable since CS removes the possibility of a lot of flaws and giving developers the best parts of JS. On the other hand, you still need clear and constraining guidelines to manage complex projects. But you need that in any language and framework. It's not just a necessity in JS development. Thank you, Jeremy. It pays off!

-----

More

Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Lists | Bookmarklet | DMCA | Y Combinator | Apply | Contact

Search: