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They sure do take a playbook from the innovation they try to foster and do new things (although it isn't necessarily "new" in the sense that other funds like this don't exist).

In the business of business-acceleration, I guess this makes YC the McKinsey or GS?

Thing is, they can't keep stretching the payout to investors.

Even a moonshot (as a business) needs to experience a liquidity event of some sort, so they're either inflating the so-called bubble with this or...

They're playing dirty with some of their first-to-market companies by helping them grow and stay cheap enough until they emerge as monopolies (-redacted- AirBnB come to mind mostly).

Edit: to my surprise, Uber isn't a YC company, edit made.

Edit 2: I am checking a list of YC companies and other big ones I see that have potential are:

- Disqus

- Heroku (exited so doesn't count)

- MixPanel

- Olark

- Embedly

- HomeJoy

- Stripe (of course!)

- Codecademy

- Firebase

I stopped at Summer 2011, but some of these are now so ubiquitous on the internet, that it makes you wonder...




Uber didn't go through YC.


Firebase was bought by Google.


Why is that playing dirty? I don't get it.


It's mostly a figure of speech. Every company is entitled to some type of discreet monopolization.

Thing is, governments (especially pro-capitalist ones) don't like monopolies, which is where the reference comes from.


>Thing is, governments (especially pro-capitalist ones) don't like monopolies, which is where the reference comes from.

A true monopoly rarely, if ever, actually exists in a real free market. However, artificial government backed monopolies are rampant today.


Oh ok, I missed the connection to monopolies. Thanks for spelling it out.




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