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Race conditions on Facebook, DigitalOcean and others (fixed) (josipfranjkovic.blogspot.com)
294 points by franjkovic 905 days ago | hide | past | web | 88 comments | favorite



I actually fixed the issue that was reported to LastPass.

I could be mistaken but I believe he reported the security issue through our regular support channel which is why it took three days to see (instead of our security channel). From the time I saw it, I fixed it with the patch going live within an hour or two.

When I DID see it, tried it myself with a quick shell script that that curled and backgrounded the same request a bunch of times, I just kind of chuckled. It was a good bug. Josip is top notch.


Thanks! I reported the bug to security@ email, and one of your team's members replied on the same day (January 6th). Either way, good job on fixing this really fast. I wish more teams are as responsive as yours.


Oh okay I was mistaken then.

I believe the race condition is on the rise in terms of severity and importance. Developers are aware of common OWASP bugs, but this type of race condition is often overlooked and developers are going to NEED to be just as aware of. Way to go.


> When I DID see it, tried it myself with a quick shell script that that curled and backgrounded the same request a bunch of times, I just kind of chuckled. It was a good bug

That's the problem with OWASP, when developer from a big company sees race condition for the first time and is surprised


BTW: I just subscribed to LastPass a few days ago. I'm pretty happy with the service.


LastPass is awesome but I hate their website login process! It bothers me to no extreme that if I type in my email address with a wrong username, it pops back with, "Invalid password" while typing in a obviously random email, it pops back with a "Unknown email address. Would you like to create an account now?."

I worry that a malicious attacker could finger the service for potential victims.


It is already normally possible to test whether email address is registered by trying to register with that email address. Unless that process is secured too, it doesn't really make much sense to not pop up Unknown email address error.


Correct -- It's a pet peeve of mine when login processes obscure this saying invalid password when the sign up process doesn't -- if you're going to tell people usernames aren't available then you shouldn't be avoiding it on the login screen.


Username enumeration is a valid concern. Requests on the login form (and some other places) are throtted. If you get too many emails wrong you will start only getting errors.


We should see lots more of these if people embrace eventual consistency instead of "slow" ACID transactions. And interestingly, the more larger scale a system, the more likely that globally consistent operations are too expensive to enable in general, and developers will overlook cases where they must implement some locking or double checking.


I would have thought that the opposite would be true; by having an CQRS/event sourcing system with eventual consistency would allow you to avoid posting duplicates to your database:

1. The user submits X number of requests within a second. 2. The system puts the request in a command queue that synchronizes the commands by coupon code, for example. 3. The command is popped off the queue and an event is generated and saved saying the coupon was redeemed. 4. The next command is picked up and all events are applied before processing. At this point, the command is no longer valid so you reject and send an event saying that an attempt was made to redeem a redeemed coupon. 5. Do the same for subsequent requests.

To me, this approach is safer and easier to reason about. You have a log of the fact that someone made the attempt so you can report on this. Not sure you get that benefit from a stored procedure and a transaction unless you build it in and then increase the running time of the open transaction.


when did eventual consistency equate to race conditions, or even increased susceptibility to race conditions? I don't follow. could you explain your reasoning further?


It's probably just an ease-of-use question. The more guarantees your database can deliver, the easier it is to reason about things and make sure you aren't being caught on a gotcha.

It's not necessarily different than using a normal RDBMS, right - you could do a check in SQL outside a transaction and end up writing multiple times. But with an RDBMS, you can easily solve the situation by turning on a transaction and leaving no question about things.

This is why things like VoltDB ("NewSQL") are pushing to keep SQL and ACID, and figure out a way to scale, instead of throwing it all aside and making the developer deal with consistency issues.

It's not that you can't end up with the same functionality using eventual consistency, just that it's harder. Just look at Amazon's "apology based computing" (I think that was the name) and how they structure their systems to be resilient by being able to resolve multiple conflicting commands in a proper way (deciding, without communication, which command wins, figuring out rollbacks, etc.) It's fantastic, and perhaps it's the only feasible way to operate at their scale. But it's also a hell of a lot more complicated than "UseTransaction = true".

(So my predictions/guesses: If developers that'd otherwise use a traditional ACID RDBMS switch to non-ACID (BASE?) systems, they'll end up introducing bugs due to the shifted responsibility of handling data consistency. And seeing how big servers are, and even how far sharding can take you with normal RDBMS, the scale at which people "need" to drop ACID is probably far higher than the point at which people are dropping it.)


I've always wondered, (but apparently not enough to figure it out by reading the Spanner whitepaper), but how do these systems typically handle it?

I guess if you were using an append only log that recorded the exact timestamp of the transcation, your datastore would eventually reconcile that for example promo code 1 was applied twice. But what do you do then? Rollback the 2nd application of promo code and deduct the credit from user account?

Where would the logic for that be programmed?


appreciating the joke (?) in the comments. https://i.imgur.com/zWE5ABQ.png


Wow, it seems like there is room here for a 3rd party vendor to implement promo code handling as a service, and to do it right once and for all.


No bounty for bug report? Should at least have a nominal fee of $100 (else no one would bother to report it).


The economics of bug bounty programs could lead to misaligned incentives. Because the overhead cost to validate and communicate around bug reports isn't zero, the % of non-bugs submitted could become imbalanced because it is free to submit.

In most systems the reward is zero, so you can infer if a person has taken the time to submit a bug report it is because he/she is invested in seeing it fixed.

Context: I work at a decent sized company in SV on this type of problem.


So when I find a bug in say Paypal which allows complete account takeover and could sell it to an organized hacker group for say $100,000 or report it to Paypal "because I'm invested in seeing it fixed" and receive nothing - that is only an easy decision for the whitest of white hat hacker.

Properly designed bug bounty programs are a cornerstone to any company who remotely cares about the security of their product, period.

The idea of misaligned incentives due to poor bug reports being free to submit is ignorant - and worse toxic, because it sounds so true to an executive who has no actual understanding of the issue.

A quality bug report should take no more than 1 minute for a reviewer to look at and know if it's really a bug or not. If it can't, it should be rejected saying provide more clear details. For example a dom based xss attack could be reported with just a target URL and it is quite clear what the problem is. That would take 10 seconds to analyze.

Additionally, most bugs reported to most decent sized companies are reported by someone who has previously reported a bug to the company before. If someone is constantly reporting good bugs or the opposite, its quite easy to prioritize which of those individuals gets their emails read first.


But not all real security issues are reported by a competent person, or by someone who has even a vague idea what the true nature of the bug is; ignoring reports for not making sense on their face is dangerous. Some companies feel they have a duty to do due diligence...

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/oldnewthing/archive/2011/12/15/10247...

(I've never been on the receiving end of a security mailbox, so I have no personal testimony as to the reasonableness of this approach.)


Your issue appears to be with bounties arising from a security vulns, which is a special class of bug that should be treated with a much higher degree of care.

The bugs expressed in this post, such as the duplicate account creation one, are not going to impact a company's bottom or top lines, so it is questionable whether it warrants a small merit award which is the idea that spawned this thread.


Hi, I'm a security engineer. I work at one of the largest private infosec firms and I've done research on bug bounties that Google, Facebook, Twitter, CERT and 50+ other companies participated in.

Now that I've sufficiently named my experience, allow me to give my side:

1. You will never receive $100,000 for selling a vulnerability in PayPal. You probably couldn't even find a buyer for it on the "black market." I have explained why repeatedly on Hacker News before, so I'm just going to link this: http://breakingbits.net/2015/04/01/understanding-vulnerabili...

2. Bug bounties are not always a net positive for an organization. They are also not a cornerstone of good security posture. A foundational focus on robust software security would start with various other things until the financials are worked out and there is someone knowledgable to read incoming reports.

Only 7% of submitted reported to companies for a responsible disclosure program are valid. This is especially true for paid programs, where the validity percentage often drops to 3% or 4%. Loads of people who know nothing about software security try to find bugs, desperate for the gold rush of bounties they see headlining places like HN. They submit spurious reports and as a result the signal to noise ratio of responsible disclosure is fantastically bad. What this means practically is that the average organization spends between 50 and 300 hours a month investigating incoming security reports.

You can quickly see how the cost adds up here. I'm not an executive or manager trying to cut costs - I've managed bug bounties for plenty of startups and Fortune 500 companies. I've also reported bugs that loads of people tell me I could have sold for "millions" of dollars - and received nothing for it.

I love bug bounties. I run them, I participate in them. But they can be a frivolous waste of time for development teams without a solid enough grasp of security to review incoming reports, and a waste of money in the worst case.

3. I'm sorry, but you lose credibility by claiming most security reports can be qualified in a minute or less. You can certainly throw out many in a similar time frame, perhaps five minutes, but real vulnerabilities? No.

If I report a server-side request forgery in your API that requires a very specific set of actions to occur in an obscure, undocumented application function, you will not qualify this quickly. Unless you are literally verifying a CSRF issue, it is completely unrealistic to assume this.

A race condition will not be qualified in a minute. A buffer overflow will not be qualified in a minute. Budget an hour per report, and be happy when you come across the reports that take you a few minutes. XSS and CSRF are comparatively simple to verify with a good report, yes, but most other classes aren't.

Let's add to this the folks who can find great vulns but write bad reports. No exploit code, but he found something real? Good luck verifying. I spoke to a fellow infosec engineer the other day and he told me he spent an entire morning out of his work day verifying a report that came in. Not patching or even triaging mind you - verifying. Most security teams do not have the olympic level efficiency and skillset diversity that Google's and Facebook's do - it is unreasonable to assume a report can or even should be verified quickly.

This is all to say that I believe your outlook is not consistent with reality, with all due respect. Bug bounties are not a simple decision to make. I've seen development teams swamped, overwhelmed and jaded from the reports they receive.


So... about that gold rush - how much work it takes to be good at it? Could it reliably provide OK income for someone or is it like other gold rushes?


> 3. I'm sorry, but you lose credibility by claiming most security reports can be qualified in a minute or less. You can certainly throw out many in a similar time frame, perhaps five minutes, but real vulnerabilities? No.

That was exactly what I was trying to convey: real vulnerabilities can easily be separated from non-issues quite quickly because the later mostly entail things which can be checked in a matter of minutes.

> You will never receive $100,000 for selling a vulnerability in PayPal. You probably couldn't even find a buyer for it on the "black market."

$100,000 may have been slightly inflated, but with a bit of creativity it isn't that hard to believe. Orchestrated correctly one could walk away with a few million dollars from exploiting such a vulnerability.

> This is all to say that I believe your outlook is not consistent with reality, with all due respect. Bug bounties are not a simple decision to make. I've seen development teams swamped, overwhelmed and jaded from the reports they receive.

Or perhaps you and I simply have experienced different realities - as I have not seen development teams swamped from them and have seen major security improvements come about as a direct result to a bug bounty program.

Of the perhaps 15-20 companies (albeit all < $1b market cap) I've spoken/worked with in regards to bug bounty programs or security in general - none of them were receiving more than a handful of reports a week which took up perhaps 2 hours of an engineer's time.


>That was exactly what I was trying to convey: real vulnerabilities can easily be separated from non-issues quite quickly because the later mostly entail things which can be checked in a matter of minutes.

What about the non-issues that are reported with complicated conditions but don't actually work? Just because you can throw out the obviously bad items doesn't mean the rest are real.

>Orchestrated correctly one could walk away with a few million dollars from exploiting such a vulnerability.

Exploiting it is rather different from selling it, though, right? And since a vuln in a website can literally be closed immediately, and PayPal's got whole divisions dedicated to preventing and undoing the damage you can do even with "account takeover", it'd be rather much a risk to pay someone cash for a vulnerability. At the first slip, the value drops to $0. Plus all the issues of verifying the bug and establishing trust for both parties. Seems rather difficult.


> What about the non-issues that are reported with complicated conditions but don't actually work? Just because you can throw out the obviously bad items doesn't mean the rest are real.

Yes. There will be some which don't fit into the overly simplistic categories I provided.

However in what I've seen the complicated condition requiring reports which turn out to not actually be bugs are rare enough where they aren't relevant to the discussion.

> Exploiting it is rather different from selling it, though, right? And since a vuln in a website can literally be closed immediately, and PayPal's got whole divisions dedicated to preventing and undoing the damage you can do even with "account takeover", it'd be rather much a risk to pay someone cash for a vulnerability. At the first slip, the value drops to $0. Plus all the issues of verifying the bug and establishing trust for both parties. Seems rather difficult.

You are hung up on what was an arbitrary example.

My point simply is if the reward for serious vulnerabilities is orders of magnitude higher if the researchers chooses the black hat instead of the white one - the overall result is a huge net negative for the world.


The arbitrary example is a good one though, because it nicely illustrates why a bug in a website just isn't worth a whole lot to sell. No matter what the issue, from a PayPal account issue to a Facebook privacy bypass, the ops teams are monitoring for this kinda thing and will shut it down quick.

Do you have first hand knowledge of selling such an exploit?


It's hard to think of an easier decision. Get $100,000 for a couple months before you go to federal prison for 30 years, or hire a publicist and get featured on every tech blog in existence as "the guy who found the PayPal complete account takeover bug," and let the 7-figure job offers roll in.


As someone who has found several arbitrary account takeover bugs impacting >100M users, I can tell you this will give you job offers, but only in the low 6 figures.

With the state of the media in the infosec industry, having your finding widely publicized doesn't mean much, either.


> let the 7-figure job offers roll in.

I would know far more millionare engineers/hackers if that was actually true

> go to federal prison for 30 years

If one was talented enough to find such a vuln, it is hardly a stretch to say they would be smart enough to avoid getting caught.


>If one was talented enough to find such a vuln, it is hardly a stretch to say they would be smart enough to avoid getting caught.

... This is plainly not true. First, the ease of finding a bug in a web app varies considerably. This article, for instance, was simply about resending requests quickly. It doesn't necessarily require amazing intellect to come across such a bug. Look at famous "hackers" that dicked around with querystrings and got into all sorts of fun.

Second, even if someone is smart and figures out how to solve a certain problem to gain root, it does not mean they're clever, aware, or dedicated enough to maintain opsec. One mistake, any time, and you're toast.


So the best solution is not to have a reward? Or not to have a publicized reward? Or don't depend on the public on bug hunting? Or just hope on goodwill?


I agree. If I had my own company I would surely provide some incentive for bugs found in the product. Whether that incentive was monetary, a free membership, etc. I think it's important to acknowledge that all software systems are imperfect.


Clearly not, though.


I'm a novice but would like to know how these issues can arise. What kind of backend setup is needed for it to be a problem? What is happening when a race condition occurs in these examples?


Its actually quite simple as example for the promo code the code looks like this:

1. Code sent.

2. Check if valid.

3. Redeem code.

4. Invalid code.

Now if i send 10 requests at the same time with the same code maybe 4-6 will hit the code part after 2.

And your window of opportunity is the time it takes to go from 3 to 4. Sometimes certain tasks are put inside async queue, you have a slight delay to your database server or you need to wait for db replication to kick in.

Because normally there is no code part to recheck how often this code was used.


Can this issue be prevented if we use the promo code as the table primary key or document ID?


That won't be enough because the promo codes are shared amongst many users. If the promo code became the primary key, then only one user would be able to redeem it.

If you introduced some combination of a user ID and promo code, then it won't prevent a race of one user firing many queries with different promo codes and stacking them up. It would, however, fix the original problem.


A simple Discount domain model with validations:

  Class Discount
    belongs_to :promo_code
    belongs_to :customer
    belongs_to :order

    validates_presence_of :promo_code, :customer, :order
    validates_associated :promo_code
    validates_uniqueness_of :promo_code_id, :scope => [:customer_id, :order_id]
  end
Limiting down to a single Promo-code per order:

  Class Discount
    # ...
    validates_uniqueness_of :order_id, :scope => :customer_id
  end


This right here is the heart of race condition bugs, and is NOT race condition safe. When running multiple web servers and without a "validates_uniqueness_of" constraint on your database, multiple requests hitting multiple different web servers can claim multiple discounts for the same user. Problem only grows as your number of web servers grow!


Read the part "Concurrency and integrity" in the Rails documentation: http://apidock.com/rails/ActiveRecord/Validations/ClassMetho...

You need to enforce the uniqueness in the DB.


Therefore the only thing left to do is run the following migration:

  add_index :discounts, [:promo_code_id, :customer_id, :order_id], :unique => true


>I'm a novice but would like to know how these issues can arise.

The problem is concurrency. Whenever you have multiple things happening at once, you have concurrency and programming concurrent system is always really hard.

Unfortunately the software industry has never really got a grip on this problem and there are lots of developers who have never really studied multi-threading at all. That's a problem, because it's something that takes a lot of practice and you have to just incorporate it into the way you think. After a while you do get a sixth sense for race conditions, but you'll still write racy code from time to time anyway. It's just tricky to get it right 100% of the time.

spdy has already outlined what is happening here, but this problem is something that is covered in literally any introductory course to database systems or multi-threaded programming. If you have two threads (or processes) in flight simultaneously that are reading and writing to a shared data store, then you need some kind of mutual exclusion. That can mean a lock:

1. Request for /reviews/add is received.

2. Database lock on the page reviews table is acquired.

3. Check if the user has already posted a review. If so, release the lock and abort (any good framework will release locks for you automatically if you throw an exception).

4. Add review to table.

5. Release lock.

At the point where the lock is acquired if another web server is in the middle of the operation, conceptually speaking the first one will stop and wait for the table to become available.

Real implementations don't actually "stop and wait" - that would be too slow. They use database transactions instead where both web server processes/threads proceed optimistically, and at the end the database will undo one of the changes if they detect that there was a conflict .... but you can imagine it as being like stop and wait.

Of course once you have concurrency, you have all the joy that comes with it like various kinds of deadlock.

It's funny, a few days ago I was letting my mind wonder and ended up thinking about web apps for some reason. Oh yes, now I remember, I was thinking about concurrency strategies in a software library I maintain and how to explain it to people. And then I was thinking how hard multi-threading is and how many people are selling snake-oil silver bullets to it, and started to wonder how many web apps had race conditions in them. And then I just discarded the thought as one of no consequence and got on with my day, haha :) Perhaps I should have tried to earn a bit of money this way instead.


This is really helpful. Thanks for sharing!


The article links to an article that explains it really well:

https://defuse.ca/race-conditions-in-web-applications.htm


It would be cool if there was a browser addon that let you submit a form N times in parallel.


I do a lot of App Sec related things and I actually use mostly Chrome dev tools and command line instead of burp and other tools. The way I reproduced the bug when it was reported was by using the "Copy to curl" feature in Chrome, and then using it as follows

    for i in `seq 1 16`;do
        curl.*&               #copied from chrome dev tools. & to background
    done


Also, curl gained a --next command line option somewhat recently. It lets you send off multiple requests in the same curl invocation. These requests will all be pipelined in the same HTTP connection, which might trigger slightly different behavior in the website.

I have considered writing a program that will let me send of a bunch of HTTP requests at once, but wait to close all the connections at the exact same time. That would probably be the most effective way to trigger race conditions.


If you go down to the "proof of concept" here it's not hard to test this: https://defuse.ca/race-conditions-in-web-applications.htm


why would it ?


More interesting than the bounty itself is to understand which defense works best at scale and the nitty gritty details of those kind of attacks. Intuitively I think that we just need to avoid inconsistencies between the Time of Check (TOC) and Time of Use (TOU), so veryfing the existence of a discount coupon while inserting it in one query should do the trick (INSERT INTO coupons (...) Values (...) WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM coupons WHERE (...)) instead of increasing the time between the TOC/TOU, e.g. one query to check if the coupon exists and a second one to insert the coupon. Besides it I am wondering if I am missing something, e.g. is this really a problem limited to the application layer or are the databases unable to prevent such attacks? I think I am right regarding the app protection, but let's see what people have to say :)


In many databases, your suggested "where not exists" sub query might not actually protect you but just make the possible window to hit the race much smaller. What happens is that your database would evaluate the subquery, the rest of the where, commit another transaction and then finally run the insert part of your query.

There are no guarantees in the SQL standard that queries with subqueries should be atomic.

The only truly safe way to protect yourself is to fix the schema in a way that you can make use of unique indexes. Those are guaranteed to be unique no matter what.


>only truly safe way

Or put the whole thing in a transaction, right?


Not if you don't have a unique index or put the transaction in a different mode than the default which often is "READ COMMITTED".

You could put the transaction in SERIALIZABLE mode, but that would mean that your database has a lot of additional locking to do which you might or might not want to pay the price for:

Your two-part query now block all other transactions from writing to the table(!) and conversely also has to wait until everybody else has finished their write operation.

Doing an opportunistic attempt with READ COMMITTED and reacting to the unique index violation (official SQLSTATE 23505) is probably the better option.

Resist the temptation of READ UNCOMMITED in this case because that might lead to false-positives as competing transactions might yet be aborted in the future.


This could be an issue of a clustered database where the requests are being load balanced to multiple masters and due to latency in replication, part of the cluster may not be consistent with the other part yet. Though for someone like DigitalOcean I'd be surprised if this was the case.


Not every database is powered by SQL. Add to that sharding, caching, cross data center traffic and the problem becomes non trivial very quickly.


sharding is what confuses me the most. How would you avoid these race conditions with a distributed database?


You often can't and that's one of the reasons the NoSQL movement gets a lot of jip from people who have been writing database applications for a long time. It's very easy to end up with a referentially inconsistent database when not using a "real" database. For some kinds of applications, notably the kinds that Google developed a lot of in its early days, you can often get away with minor database corruption. If a page drops out of the web search index for a bit until some batch job comes along and fixes things up, ok, no big deal. Nobody was promised they'd be in the index. If you have giant but basically flat tables of entities that don't reference each other, then something like BigTable is exactly what you need.

If you're trying to build a social network that's full of graphs and edges between them ...... good luck. Google developed technologies like MegaStore and Spanner to handle this. Before it had those, it used huge sharded MySQL instances.


Pick a good shard key. In the case of a per-page-per-user ratings system, if you shard on the PageId, then you can locally check consistency to make sure there's no duplicate (PageId, UserId) keys. You can check the same if you shard on UserId, but then doing aggregates can be more difficult since you need to talk to every shard to find out a page's rating.


You can either reconcile periodically, or you can make it not distributed in the way that matters.


Or just use a UNIQUE INDEX.


You are making a lot of assumptions about architecture. Not everything is back by a simple sql database. Some sites utilize event stores and read only data stores to provide data access/storage. Other sites have other unique architectures that make this specific issue a lot harder to mitigate than a simple unique constraint.


I'd never heard of "WHERE NOT EXISTS", but my first approach would be to make the pair (user_id, cupon_code) unique together, so that only one insertion can be made and only do any further processing if that transaction does not fail.


So the review bug was a security issue but the username bug wasn't? I wonder what else the review bug affected.


I think they did not reward me because you cannot really hurt anyone by having multiple usernames.


What about squatting on valuable ones? But probably not a big deal unless it relates to Pages.


Can anyone comment on how the author flooded HTTP requests to the endpoint URLs? Did he use developer tools in his browser and execute his own JavaScript, or use CURL in a tight loop with the cookie and CSRF token from his browser session?


Without knowing exactly how he did it I assume this is possible by doing a POST with cURL inside a loop or with parallel.

You can then get the exact request by using Chrome developer-tools. (Find the POST-request in the network-tab, right-click and select copy as cURL)


I have reported the same issue with Digital Ocean (security) in November 2014, and they told me I was using the wrong address and that they forwarded it to the proper team. I triggered it by accident, using the same GitHub code twice, and I (or the DO staffer) didn't realize it was a race condition. I never heard back but they let me keep the balance :)


I would be really interested to know how various forms of this bug are resolved. This seems like a problem that, on its surface, seems easy to fix, but isn't. Especially if you've designed your architecture for real-time-ness and global redundancy. Google's servers with atomic clocks come to mind...


cynical answer: I've seen alot of races get "fixed" by adding a sleep() or similar

less cynical answer: Commonly you already have some kind of means to handle races - locking, transactions, some other variety of extra check - and the fix for newly discovered races is "oh, I didn't realise that could happen. add lock"


If you get three requests in at the same time, and sleep the tree for N (say, 400) miliseconds they'll all still run concurrently.

Adding a random time to sleep might work, but some requests would run noticeably slower.


Unless the code is doing read-write-read. If you're using a system that doesn't reflect writes immediately (like Elasticsearch), waiting after the writes can give time for the system to flush and make the other writes visible then you can execute rollback logic.

It'd be much better to make sure you're updating the same unique key and/or use the DB's conflict resolution system.


Now that race condition bugs have been widely exposed, I have a feeling we'll start seeing more of these "attacks" in the near future. They are relatively easy to execute and don't raise a high suspicion.


Now please fix race conditions everywhere else, like Baltimore.

yesmade 905 days ago [flagged]

$3k for the facebook review bug. that's a little bit too much

- update

thanks for the downvotes guys. keep up the good work


The bounty actually surprised me, too. I expected between $1000-$2000. That is one of reasons I like reporting bugs to Facebook - they pay really good, critical bugs are fixed really fast (<1 day).

One time they paid me $5000 for a bug I never could have found, but they did internally based on my low severity report. (http://josipfranjkovic.blogspot.com/2013/11/facebook-bug-bou...)


It’s impressive that they are able to fix them so quickly – one needs to imagine they get a non-trivial number of reports, and that some majority of them are junk. They have a good triage + repro + escalation system.


Facebook puts out stats from their bug bounty program once a year. Most of bugs are invalid reports - in 2013 they had 14,763 reports, with 687 being valid.

(https://www.fb.com/818902394790655)

They probably got a couple people working exclusively on bug bounty reports. I also have to say they did a great job changing communication channels from emails to tickets which show in /support/, it is way easier now. The downside is that you must have a Facebook account, not sure if it was needed before the change.


congratulations on both findings


This bug actually seems quite critical imo, defeats the purpose of a feature and permits abuse/cheating


Who are you to say that it's "too much," when it's their money than they can spend as they wish?


> seems > too > much

relax guy nobody here is angry at the amount he made


I don't see "seems" anywhere in there. As written, it sounds extremely judgmental.


Instead of questioning why others are getting so much, question why you're getting so little.


chill out man. you are turning this into something personal. it was only a comment at the amount he got for cheating the review system. even the OP said he wasn't expecting that much.

stop jumping into the hate wagon everybody


I wasn't judging you, haha. I'm just saying, it makes more strategic sense in general to bring yourself up to the level of others (however inflated) rather than bring others down to yours.


Perhaps Gigablah was trying to be helpful?

HN can be frustrating if you provoke it. The problem isn't so much what you said as how you put it: the combination of dismissive tone and superficial content puts readers here on edge, because too many comments are like that and we all find them annoying. As a result it's easy to have your good intentions misread. If you had explained the thought process behind your comment, I think it would have been received better.




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